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Gardening

Planning and creating a wildlife-friendly garden

Whether you want to create a new garden, or have an existing one, patio or balcony, try to imagine your garden is a nature reserve and you are the warden. More...

Planning and creating a wildlife-friendly garden

Planting for wildlife

A wildlife friendly garden doesn't have to be wild or overgrown, but can look attractive all year round. Growing a wide variety of plants offers wildlife food and shelter. More...

Planting for wildlife

Peat-free gardening

The large-scale removal of peat from bogs in Britain and Ireland is destroying one of our most precious wildlife habitats. It takes centuries for a peat bog to form, with its special wildlife - modern machinery destroys it in days. More...

Peat-free gardening

Chemical-free pest control

Chemical control can be harmful to the environment and wildlife that may not be the problem species the chemicals are aimed at. Many of the species persecuted are not actually harmful to gardens, or can be effectively controlled. More...

Chemical-free pest control

Lawns for wildlife

The lawn is the focal point of many gardens. It's a place to let off steam or sit and relax, but also a valuable habitat for wildlife. More...

Lawns for wildlife

Ponds for wildlife

Almost any water body, whatever its size, will have some wildlife value, even if only as a drinking place for birds. However, this value can be greatly increased if the pond is well designed and maintained. More...

Ponds for wildlife

Dead wood for wildlife

An important, but often overlooked, element of the garden is the presence of dead and decaying wood. More...

Dead wood for wildlife

Homes for mammals

Several types of mammals visit gardens and what you can attract depends on where you live and the surrounding landscape and habitats. More...

Homes for mammals

Homes for insects

Insects such as ladybirds, lacewings and hoverflies feed on aphids and other insects considered less beneficial in the garden. Bumblebees, solitary bees and wasps are also very useful as a natural form of pest control. Others help with pollinating plants around the garden. More...

Homes for insects

Homes for reptiles and amphibians

The UK only has a few reptiles and amphibians. Most are shy and seldom seen and soon react to vibrations from approaching feet or shadows cast by humans. None are poisonous or dangerous and can be attracted into your garden. More...

Homes for reptiles and amphibians