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Injured and baby birds

Please note that, as a conservation organisation, the RSPB has no expertise at all on welfare matters of any kind, and no facilities for keeping birds in captivity, regardless of species or reason. 

Consequently, our staff will not be able to assist with a bird that needs veterinary or captive care. Other organisations are set out to perform this function – the national welfare groups are RSPCA in England and Wales, SSPCA in Scotland, and USPCA in Northern Ireland. In addition, many vets are often able to treat an injured bird, and local specialist wildlife rescue centres can be found on www.helpwildlife.co.uk

Information on the following pages has been provided by welfare specialists to help you assess a situation and take the correct initial action, after which you need to contact a relevant welfare group for further information and assistance.

Injured birds

Being handled and treated is a very stressful experience for an injured bird, and before you attempt to catch it, you should consider the benefits of treatment weighed against this. More...

Injured birds

Baby birds

In spring and summer, it's common to see young birds on the ground that look as if they've been abandoned by their parents. Read on for advice on what to do if you find a young bird... More...

Baby birds

Bird deformities

Deformities have been recorded in a wide range of birds and are most frequently seen in species that are easily observable, such as garden birds. These deformities can be caused by injury, genetic defect and disease and most noticeably affect the bill and legs. More...

Bird deformities

Humane destruction

It is natural to feel that a bird, however seriously injured, must be given a chance of life. More...