Random bird thread

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Random bird thread

  • That's a lovely picture, Aiki - its colouring is beautiful. Thank you.

  • I don't want keep hogging this thread but there's a lot still to get through.

    I'm intrigued to know what No 2 might be. We've had 1 = African Penguin and 3 = Arctic Skua so No 2 please.

    Also if you have a picture of a Lesser Spotted Woodpecker I'd love to see that. We had them breed on my local patch but I've failed to get a photo.

  • In an attempt to find the magnificent Osprey I'm going to hazard a stab at number 161.

  • TeeJay

    I don't want keep hogging this thread but there's a lot still to get through.

    I'm intrigued to know what No 2 might be. We've had 1 = African Penguin and 3 = Arctic Skua so No 2 please.

    Also if you have a picture of a Lesser Spotted Woodpecker I'd love to see that. We had them breed on my local patch but I've failed to get a photo.

    No. 2 - Alpine Swift. One lousy photo, a bird photographed on Malta on its northward migration. The city walls that surround Dubrovnik in Croatia are full of nesting Alpine Swifts.

    Lesserspot is no. 132. I have one photo only, of a male I found in woodland near Tunbridge Wells, and it's AWFUL. But I'm not deleting it, not til I get something better, anyway. At just 21g, an LSW is a quarter the weight of its big brother, the Great Spotted Woodpecker.

  • Clare

    In an attempt to find the magnificent Osprey I'm going to hazard a stab at number 161.

    So close! 161 is... Orange-headed Thrush. Photographed at London Zoo. It is native to India. and south-east Asia, and has about 12 recognised subspecies, many endemic to particular Indonesian islands or island groups.

    For Osprey, you want 162. But there's nothing magnificent about my Osprey photos, I'm afraid. This one was at Radipole Lake in Dorset (pre DSLR days again), being given a hard time by the local Black-headed Gulls. I doubt there's any Osprey fact I can produce that isn't already well known to the keen Ospreyites on this forum :) It is the only species in the genus Pandion, and that genus is the only one in the family Pandionidae. The name Pandion comes from a king in Greek mythology - in fact two kings, Pandion the first and Pandion the second. One of Pandion the second's sons was Nisus, who was invulnerable in battle thanks to his magic purple hair (I swear I am not making this up). His name became the species name for Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus).

  • They're both beautiful, Aiki - thank you!

  • Thanks for those, aiki. I don't think I've ever managed a photo of an Alpine Swift although I've seen them quite often. My most distinct memory was when I was on holiday in Paxos, just south of Corfu, one September probably about 15 years ago.. A huge flock came over on their southward migration and they were obviously catching insects above the villa where I was staying. Their twittering calls was the thing that first attracted my attention. I wasn't into photography in those days. They might well have been the ones that nested up the coast in Croatia.

    At least you've got a shot of a LSW. I had the opportunity earlier this year but couldn't get the camera to focus before it flew off. Most frustrating.

  • aiki

    Male light-morph Arctic Skuas are more stroppy and so take longer to form pair bonds than dark morphs, which works to the light-morphs' advantage in the north of the range where food supplies for chicks are usually better later in the season than earlier. But further south, dark morphs are more successful breeders.

    Thank you for that :)  My mind is boggling - I thought Skuas (what is the plural?) were fairly feisty as it was!  giggling at the thought of a stroppy one!

    Number 52 please if it is still free :)

    Caroline in Jersey

  • Germain

    aiki

    Male light-morph Arctic Skuas are more stroppy and so take longer to form pair bonds than dark morphs, which works to the light-morphs' advantage in the north of the range where food supplies for chicks are usually better later in the season than earlier. But further south, dark morphs are more successful breeders.

    Thank you for that :)  My mind is boggling - I thought Skuas (what is the plural?) were fairly feisty as it was!  giggling at the thought of a stroppy one!

    Number 52 please if it is still free :)

    Caroline in Jersey

    The plural of skua is skuas :)

    No. 52 is Common Sandpiper. Another species I've not photographed very often, or very well. This one was having a paddle in the River Spey in the Highlands, on a very rainy day. This is a very widespread species (and migrates south in winter, making it even more widespread). The people of the Nukumanu islands (Papua New Guinea) call the Common Sandpiper 'matakakoni', which means 'bird that walks a little then copulates'.

  • aiki
    The people of the Nukumanu islands (Papua New Guinea) call the Common Sandpiper 'matakakoni', which means 'bird that walks a little then copulates'.

    That made me chuckle. Fancy having one word to mean all that.

  • Aiki, you're amazing - you not only take all these wonderful pictures, you then back them up with all of this great information!  I'm so pleased you started this thread.

    Could I possibly have number 171, please?

  • 222 is a spotted fly-catcher.  Being a complete and utter accountant (well, sometimes) I've actually got a list of which numbers have gone.  Hope Aiki doesn't think I'm too sad!

  • Nice to see you this morning, Alan - are you well?

  • Clare

    Aiki, you're amazing - you not only take all these wonderful pictures, you then back them up with all of this great information!  I'm so pleased you started this thread.

    Could I possibly have number 171, please?

    Thank you :) I'm surprised (but pleased) that this thread's being quite popular! No. 171 is Pochard. This species occurs on my local patch so I have plenty of pics, but I'm putting up an old one from a London park, as it's one of the first photos I ever took (of anything) that I actually liked :) Pochards don't occur in North America but they have not one but two lookalike relatives there - the Redhead and the Canvasback. Both of these have occurred naturally (as well as escapees) in the UK, so check those Pochards carefully :)

  • doggie

    Morning Clare i'm fine thank you..you well?

    I'm just back from a 5 mile walk starting off in light rain and ending up in pleasant sunshine,and plenty of bird life.

    I'm all right but the weather is disgusting here.  This didn't stop the Greater Spotted Woodpecker making her appearance, though.