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Results for tori-lines, South Africa
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  • Blog Post: The benefits of a tori line

    Late August and early September saw me on the Godetia, owned by Irvin and Johnson: a 56-metre wet-fish trawler. The objective of this cruise was to compare how seabirds interacted with and without flying a tori line whilst offal was discarded. The number of different types of birds around was low, but...
  • Blog Post: The impact of trawlers on albatrosses

    Barry and I spend as much time on deck as possible. Our main work is monitoring interactions between seabirds and the two warp cables at the stern. To do this, we sit for hours on end on the 'catwalk', a raised metal gantry above the stern of the boat. Barry's work has shown that it is...
  • Blog Post: Positive response

    Mid-October saw me giving two presentations to skippers and industry representatives about how to prevent albatross deaths in the South African hake trawl fishery. The venue was Cape Town and four fishing companies were represented. Seabirds are attracted to vessels to feed on discards from processed...
  • Blog Post: Continuing where we left off

    After the trip to Namibia in October where we learnt from interviewing skippers that seabird bycatch may be a problem, we decided to head back and continue what we had started. Now it was time to go to sea and see what really happens there. I spent four weeks in the town of Luderitz in southern Namibia...
  • Blog Post: Aloe! Aloe!

    Peter Exley, from the RSPB, had chosen to come to Cape Town for his sabbatical. He is helping me to produce an awareness brochure on conserving seabirds in the South African hake trawl fishery. Meeting him at the airport, it was clear after several minutes of chat that he was as keen as mustard to get...
  • Blog Post: Shark catching

    I've just returned from a two and a half week trip onboard shark longliner. The shark longline fleet in South Africa is pretty small, only 3-4 vessels, which mainly fish for mako sharks. The gear set up of the vessel is slightly different but the fishing techniques are very similar to the swordfish...
  • Blog Post: Longing for the big blue

    Hi albatross fans! It's been a long time since the last time I wrote. Too much 'dry land' business which confined me to my mother city. However, we had a visit from Ben Sullivan, manager of the Global Seabird Programme. It was really great to finally meet the guy who runs the show. Lots...
  • Blog Post: A month of great accomplishments

    I have returned finally, from what seemed like a lifetime at sea and on foreign soil. Three trips were conducted on Eros, a hake longliner for Talhado Fisheries, with the help of very committed men on land and at sea. I've now completed seabird fatality data collection on board hake longline vessels...
  • Blog Post: Hectic but rewarding

    This week I am writing to you from the RSPB headquarters in the UK! I am here on a vacation and took the opportunity to meet the people here who are co-ordinating the task force and all of the PR effort on its behalf. My last week in South Africa was hectic but rewarding. The workshop with hake fisheries...
  • Blog Post: Still getting hooked

    I just got back from a trip on a South African longliner that targets swordfish and tuna. The trip was two and a half weeks long and took place off the west coast of South Africa. Five albatrosses were accidentally caught on the longline. Four of them were dead, as they were caught while the vessel was...
  • Blog Post: Community centre helps save albatross in South Africa

    Each year thousands of seabirds are accidentally killed while foraging behind fishing vessels in the world’s oceans. Thanks to a device known as a bird scaring line, which is flown behind vessels to protect the danger areas, seabird bycatch has been reduced in some fisheries by up to 90%. Ocean...
  • Blog Post: Wrapped up in birds!

    I have just returned from my first adventure at sea for 2010. I must say, even though the weather and fishing was poor, I managed to see my favourite albatross of all – the GREAT ocean roamer: the wandering albatross ! It was a stunning, very snowy-white adult that really enjoyed circling close...
  • Blog Post: Patrolling our oceans

    Last week I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity (along with a member of WWF’s Responsible Fisheries Programme) to spend a few days at sea on the South African Government’s offshore patrol vessel. This trip was very different from my normal trips onboard the commercial fishing vessels...
  • Blog Post: First trip with no casualties

    Hi again - the last trip was the shortest of the three trips, only 10 days. But it was very interesting as it was located on the north-east coast of South Africa, in an area very different to the west coast in terms of sea temperatures and the currents that influence the species found and affected by...
  • Blog Post: Building relationships

    As I told you before I am on land right now, getting ready for the next trip. We're also busy preparing a workshop for the tuna longliners all about bycatch - I'm meeting the chairman of the Tuna Longline Association on Thursday. Today the vessel which took me onboard last month came back from...
  • Blog Post: A nice surprise

    Hake feed at night close to the surface and return to the bottom in the morning. As a result, lines are set in the early morning. As in the tuna longlining, the birds are getting caught while trying to seize the baits during the setting of the line, but also getting caught on hooks while feeding on...
  • Blog Post: Heavy on board

    Earlier this month, I returned from Hobart, Tasmania, where I had attended the annual Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and had some very interesting chats about conservation. Then, it was back to business on a wet-fish trawler. From Cape Town, we headed up the west...