We love Wales!

We love Wales!

We love Wales!
Croeso! If you love all things Welsh and wild then this is the group for you. Here you can chat to other RSPB supporters, share your stories and tips, and post photos of wildlife and wild places.

We love Wales!

  • Big Garden Birdwatch – Dramatis Personae (Part Two)

    The week of the RSPB’s annual Big Garden Birdwatch is upon us! There is still time to register online for this weekend’s survey. Click the link at the bottom of this blog to get involved.

    Around half a million people across the UK took part in 2014 – with over 22,500 taking part from Wales. RSPB Cymru is urging more people of Wales to take part this year, making it bigger and better!

    The wildlife survey, now in its 36th year, provides the RSPB with an important snapshot of garden bird populations in winter and has helped to highlight some dramatic declines in UK garden birds over the last three decades.  For the second year running, the RSPB is also asking participants to log the other wildlife they see in their outside spaces, to help the charity build an overall picture of how important our gardens are for giving nature a home.

     In this second blog I want to introduce you to the less common visitors you may be adding to your list during your one hour watching time.

    The first straddles the common/ less frequent visitor category, but I thought I would include it here as the male and female of the species are strikingly different. If you are feeding birds you will invariably attract the attention of the local Sparrowhawk if you have one. TMale Sparrowhawkhis top predator is not always a welcome visitor to people’s gardens, but if one does happen to swoop through and try to catch one the birds on your feeding station, providing a record of its presence is vital. The very fact you have Sparrowhawk in your area means you have a pretty healthy ecosystem to support a top predator. If there wasn’t a suitable food supply to support it, then it would simply be elsewhere. The female is much larger than the male of the species, in fact one of the largest size differential in sexes anywhere in the bird world. The female is a wonderful chestnut mottled brown, where the male is more of a blue-ish grey and is twenty five percent smaller. Both have the stripped chests, the male with a subtle peachy blush from its cheeks down to the shoulders of the wings. The Peregrine Falcon and the Kestrel are always held as the UK’s favourite birds of prey, but let’s face it, you are highly unlikely to get either of them in your garden, but the chances are there will be a smattering of records for the Sparrowhawk, and I for one would be chuffed if I managed to tick one Sunday.

    Male SiskinOne of the great aspects of seeing the results of the mass of data when it is published several months after this weekend is watching the rise and rise of Siskins and Goldfinches up the table. Goldfinches have been common place in the garden for quite some time now, but their much smaller cousin the Siskin is a more recent arrival. It is simply becoming a garden bird rather than a woodland bird because of our wonderful habit of putting food out, especially niger seeds. From personal experience I can also tell you that if you put shelled sunflower hearts out (or RSPB’s own No Mess Sunflower Mix) then these little finches will appear in droves! This diminutive canary like bird can resemble a Greenfinch, but obviously much smaller and it has a distinct black wing bar. The male sport a fetching black cap, with the females being a striped green, this is a wonderful time of year to attract them to your garden, as the numbers in the southern half of the country can be swollen by northern migrants. They are not particularly shy birds, and another wonderful addition to your garden list.

    Male BullfinchFar shier is the wonderfully coloured Bullfinch. If you are blessed to have these wonderful seed eaters in your garden then you are very lucky indeed. Another bird with expensive tastes, the same sunflower heart mix was the best way to attract them into my old garden, and indeed this almost semi urban one I have now. The male is unmistakable, his blush red chest and ink black head makes him a striking fellow. The female is wonderfully attractive too, being a delightful chestnut brown, with the same black cap. A wonderful example of sexual di-morphism, a term to impress your friends with! Basically it means the male and female are strikingly different in colours, the male a bright to show off and attract a mate, the females far dowdier, but able to camouflage themselves whilst sitting on the nest.

     Our final character is another chart climber as well as a tree trunk climber. The Great Spotted Woodpecker is undergoing a bit of a boom of the moment. In a wonderful example of how nature just does what it does and the influence of politics sometimes lags behind, whilst the debate over whether the Great Spotted Woodpecker should be reintroduced into Ireland or not raged, the birds themselves settled the argument by flying across the Irish Sea and getting on with the job of recolonising the island anyway.

     If you live near any kind of woods, and you put some fat cakes or fat balls out, if there are Great Spotted Woodpeckers about then they will find you. They are like a magnet for them. We once had fiveFemale Great Spotted Woodpecker individuals (2 adults, 3 youngsters) in the garden at once. Quite easily recognised and much, much larger than the rare Lesser Spotted Woodpecker, these birds are rapidly climbing the most seen species charts, breaking into the top twenty. The mild wet winter has done nothing to stop me believing they will probably climb a few places again this year. The abundance of dead wood after recent storms provides even more of their natural food, which are the burrowing beetles and grubs that eat this decaying matter. My final ID tip in these blogs is another one to impress friends with. The male and female can be ID’d by simply checking if it has a red cap or not. The male always sports a red cap; the female is black all over. As with all birding knowledge there are perils! Avoid their breeding season to show off of new found skills, as the juveniles all sport red heads for the first months after fledging!

    There ends my brief roundup of some of the birds you may see over this weekend if you are taking part. You are still able to register online and print out any information you may require from the Big Garden Birdwatch part of the RSPB Website. You have until February 13th to get your results in, and whilst you are writing that date in your diary, flip the page and write National Nest Box Day on the next page on the 14th. With a pair of Blue Tits showing interest in my nest box this week... I will hopefully be returning to this subject in the coming weeks.

    Until then ... happy birdwatching this weekend!

     

    All images © Anthony Walton

  • Look at your gardens through the eyes of the bird... Big Garden Birdwatch

    World’s biggest garden wildlife survey takes place Saturday 24 & Sunday 25 January

    People taking part in this year’s RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch (Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 January) should watch how the birds use their garden as well as watching the birds themselves, says RSPB Cymru

    “Seeing things through the eyes of a bird will help you to understand exactly how they use what’s in your garden, spot anything that makes it an unsafe or inhospitable place, and allow you to improve the ways you give nature a home when spring arrives,” says RSPB Cymru Biodiversity Manager, Stephen Bladwell.

    More than half a million people are expected to watch and count their garden birds during this weekend’s RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch, which is now in its 36th year. The survey provides important information about the changes in numbers of birds using our gardens in winter, and helps alert conservationists to those species in decline like greenfinches and starlings.

    Starling 


    Experts are interested to see how the mixed weather conditions around the UK so far this year affect the number of birds in gardens in different areas. Will numbers be low because natural food sources in the countryside are abundant, or will birds appear in their droves to make the most of garden feeders?

     RSPB scientists are keen that, whatever the weather, as many people as possible take part.


    Stephen continues: “Whilst putting out food for birds is important, it’s not the be-all and end-all. Birds need a wide variety of plants to shelter and perch to be able to make use of the feeders we provide in winter, as well as nectar-rich plants that attract insects in summer. During this year’s Birdwatch look at how the birds approach your feeders using the various trees, shrubs and bushes. Making your garden more nature-friendly is the best way you can help the birds and other wildlife that use it – and by doing so you’ll attract even more to your garden for you to enjoy! ”


    Last year, for the first time, the RSPB asked participants to log some of the other wildlife they see in their gardens to help build an overall picture of how important our gardens are for giving nature a home.

     Participants don’t have to see and count these other species during the hour of the Big Garden Birdwatch survey. They just fill in the form to tell the RSPB how frequently they saw them in their gardens over the past year.

     “It’s not always possible to survey other animals in the same way as birds, as they tend to be more secretive, nocturnal, less numerous or hibernating at the time the Big Garden Birdwatch happens. But this way the RSPB can find out where in the country these creatures appear and how frequently,” says Stephen.

     Like last year, the RSPB will share the results with Amphibian & Reptile Conservation (ARC), People’s Trust for Endangered Species (PTES) and The Mammal Society to add to their species databases. Results will help all the organisations involved build their understanding about the threats facing garden wildlife.

    This year, slow worms and grass snakes have been added to the list. Other species that will be surveyed again include badgers, hedgehogs, deer and foxes.  Alternating the wildlife species surveyed each year will enable a system by which species are surveyed at least once every three years. This will provide sufficient data to determine whether distributions change over time.


    Marina Pacheco, CEO of The Mammal Society said:  “The best thing people can do for mammals in the garden is having a pond or ready source of water at ground level and gaps in their fences so that animals like hedgehogs can get into their gardens. We are very worried about the proliferation of concrete baseboards for garden fences as it's keeping our wildlife out of gardens and reducing connectivity.”

    Dr John Wilkinson from Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (ARC), said: “Not many people realise how important gardens are for some reptiles and amphibians. If you can, having a compost bin will not only help recycle garden and kitchen waste but you might even get slow-worms setting up home in the warm, decomposing vegetable matter and if you’re very lucky grass snakes will find your heap and lay their leathery eggs in it! If reptiles do start using your heap, avoid turning the compost in summer and autumn when baby slow-worms and grass snakes are emerging.”

    Henry Johnson, Hedgehog Officer, People's Trust for Endangered Species, said: “Once again this massive survey is showing us how amazing gardens are for wild things. Brits still have hedgehogs visiting their gardens, and this is something to cherish as they are in trouble. Hedgehogs cannot fly and need lots of gardens to thrive so make sure yours is linked to your neighbours with a small (13cm2) hole. Then every British street can be a Hedgehog Street.”

    Stephen Bladwell from RSPB Cymru, added: “This massive survey shows how important our gardens are for the amazing variety of wildlife living there. Adding slow worms and grass snakes to this year’s survey is a big step towards capturing more data to help us and our partners identify how the distribution of garden wildlife may have changed amongst a variety of species in coming years. Hopefully, the fact that more people are helping to give nature a home in their gardens and outside spaces will mean we’ll begin to see improvements rather than declines.”

    House sparrows were the most commonly recorded species across all of Wales except Powys where blue tits topped the list. House sparrows have increased in Wales whereas across the rest of the UK the numbers recorded in BGBW have decreased by more than 20% over the last 10 years. This is consistent with trends identified in Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) where house sparrows have increased in Wales by more than 95% since 1995 whereas in England they have declined by more than 10% since 1995 (BBS 2013). 

    The RSPB hopes to use the data to build an overall picture of how important our gardens are for all types of wildlife and tailor its advice so people can help their wild visitors find a home, feed and breed successfully.

    The Big Garden Birdwatch is part of the RSPB’s Giving Nature a Home campaign, aimed at tackling the housing crisis facing the UK’s threatened wildlife. The charity is asking people to provide a place for wildlife in their own gardens and outside spaces – whether it by planting pollen-rich plants to attract bees and butterflies, putting up a nestbox for a house sparrow, or creating a pond that will support a number of different species. To find out how you can give nature a home where you live visit rspb.org.uk/homes.

    You can register to take part in the Big Garden Birdwatch and find out more by visiting at rspb.org.uk/birdwatch

    2014 Big Garden Birdwatch results:

    Top 20 Wales

    Rank

    2014 Wales species

    Average per garden

    1

    House sparrow

    5.5

    2

    Blue tit

    3.6

    3

    Starling

    2.7

    4

    Chaffinch

    2.7

    5

    Blackbird

    2.1

    6

    Great tit

    1.6

    7

    Goldfinch

    1.4

    8

    Robin

    1.2

    9

    Jackdaw

    1.2

    10

    Magpie

    1.1

    11

    Collared Dove

    1.1

    12

    Long tailed tit

    0.9

    13

    Dunnock

    0.9

    14

    Woodpigeon

    0.8

    15

    Coal tit

    0.8

    16

    Carrion crow

    0.7

    17

    Greenfinch`

    0.6

    18

    Feral Pigeon

    0.5

    19

    Siskin

    0.2

    20

    Wren

    0.2

     

     

    The common species we would generally see in BGBW

    Figure 1: Changes in abundance for common species recorded as part of BGBW since 2003.

    Species

    Change 2003 - 2014

    Wales

    UK

    blackbird

    -12.5

    -20.4

    Blue Tit

    -21.4

    -21.1

    chaffinch

    -28.0

    -31.6

    coal Tit

    -34.3

    -22.0

    collared dove

    -25.6

    -31.1

    dunnock

    -20.2

    -24.8

    great tit

    -18.7

    -14.7

    greenfinch

    -69.5

    -70.3

    house sparrow

    2.0

    -21.9

    magpie

    -12.7

    -3.9

    robin

    -21.7

    -19.5

    song thrush

    -70.6

    -72.6

    starling

    -41.9

    -51.4

    woodpigeon

    32.2

    27.2

    wren

    -57.7

    -62.6

    The ones we are losing

    Though the breeding populations of song thrushes in Wales appear relatively stable, since 2003 we are seeing less than a third of the song thrushes we used to in our gardens during BGBW. This species relies heavily on worms, insects and, fruit and berry trees/shrubs such as apples, hawthorn, ivy, blackthorn etc.

    Windfalls are a welcome site for many thrushes (song thrushes, blackbirds) and starlings in your garden at this time of year. Apples and pears can be a lifeline when the winter gets very cold and there are few berries left on bushes and in hedges.

    Starlings are still one of the common birds seen in our gardens during BGBW but they have declined dramatically over the last 10 years. In 2003 we were seeing almost 5 starlings per garden surveyed but in 2014 that has plummeted to fewer than 3 per garden. The decline of starlings recorded during BGBW mirrors the alarming results we see in breeding populations as shown by other surveys such as BBS (-70% decline since 1995).

    Greenfinch numbers continue their worrying decline and remain on 17th place likely due to Trichomonosis disease. Help fight this disease by giving your feeders, bird tables, and bird baths a regular clean.

     

     

    Some of the rarer visitors to your gardens (in Wales)

                                                    Number of gardens

    Waxwing                                             2

    Barn owl                                              5

    Tawny owl                                          14

    Skylark                                                  2

    Grey partridge                                  6

    Kestrel                                                  30

    Chiffchaff                                            19

    Green woodpecker                        56

    Willow tit                                             65

    Goldcrest                                            89

  • Edrychwch ar eich gardd drwy lygaid aderyn... Gwylio Adar y Ardd

     

    Dylai pobl sy’n cymryd rhan yn arolwg Gwylio Adar yr Ardd eleni (Sadwrn 24 a Sul 25 Ionawr) sylwi sut  mae adar yn defnyddio eu gerddi’n ogystal â gwylio’r adar eu hunain y flwyddyn hon. 


    “Bydd gweld pethau trwy lygaid aderyn yn eich helpu i ddeall yn union sut maent yn defnyddio’r hyn sydd yn eich gardd, yn sylwi ar unrhyw beth sy’n ei wneud yn fan peryglus neu ddigroeso, a’ch galluogi chi i wella eich dulliau o roi cartref i fyd natur pan fydd y gwanwyn yn cyrraedd,” meddai Stephen Bladwell, Rheolwr Bioamrywiaeth RSPB Cymru.

    Disgwylir y bydd dros hanner miliwn o bobl yn gwylio ac yn cyfrif adar eu gerddi yn ystod penwythnos Gwylio Adar yr Ardd yr RSPB y penwythnos hwn.  Mae’r arolwg, sydd bellach yn 36 oed, yn darparu gwybodaeth bwysig am y newidiadau yn nifer yr adar sy’n defnyddio ein gerddi yn y gaeaf, ac yn helpu i dynnu sylw cadwraethwyr at y rhywogaethau hynny sy’n prinhau fel y llinos werdd a’r ddrudwen.

    Y drudwy 


    Mae gan arbenigwyr ddiddordeb mewn gweld sut mae’r amodau tywydd cymysg o amgylch y DU hyd yma eleni wedi effeithio ar y nifer o adar mewn gerddi gwahanol ardaloedd.  A fydd y nifer yn isel oherwydd bod digon o ffynonellau o fwyd naturiol yng nghefn gwlad, neu a fydd heidiau o adar yn galw heibio i wneud yn fawr o fwydwyr yn yr ardd?

    Mae gwyddonwyr yr RSPB yn awyddus iawn i weld cymaint o bobl â phosib yn cymryd rhan, beth bynnag fo’r tywydd.


    Meddai Stephen: “Er bod gosod bwyd i’r adar yn bwysig, nid dyma’r unig beth hanfodol.  Mae angen amrywiaeth eang o blanhigion sy’n cynnig lloches a rhywle i glwydo ar adar er mwyn gwneud yn fawr o’r bwydwyr a ddarperir gennym yn y gaeaf, yn ogystal â phlanhigion llawn neithdar sy’n denu pryfed yn yr haf.  Yn ystod y Gwylio Adar eleni edrychwch sut mae adar yn agosáu at eich bwydwyr wrth ddefnyddio’r amrywiol goed, llwyni a pherthi.  Wrth sicrhau bod eich gardd yn fwy cyfeillgar i fyd natur gallwch helpu’r adar a’r bywyd gwyllt arall sy’n ei defnyddio - ac wrth wneud hynny byddwch yn denu hyd yn oed mwy i’ch gardd i chi eu mwynhau!”

    Y llynedd, am y tro cyntaf, gofynnodd yr RSPB i’r sawl oedd yn cymryd rhan nodi rhywfaint o’r bywyd gwyllt arall a welwyd yn eu gerddi er mwyn helpu i greu darlun drwyddo draw o ba mor bwysig yw ein gerddi ar gyfer sicrhau cartref i fyd natur.

    Nid oes angen i’r sawl sy’n cymryd rhan weld a chyfrif y rhywogaethau eraill yma’n ystod awr arolwg Gwylio Adar yr Ardd.  Maent yn llenwi’r ffurflen i adael i’r RSPB wybod pa mor aml y’u gwelwyd yn eu gerddi’n ystod y flwyddyn ddiwethaf.

     “Dydy hi ddim yn bosibl bob amser arolygu anifeiliaid eraill yn yr un modd ag adar, oherwydd maen nhw’n tueddu i fod yn fwy dirgel, yn galw heibio yn y nos, yn llai niferus neu’n gaeafgysgu yn ystod cyfnod Gwylio Adar yr Ardd.  Ond fel hyn fe all yr RSPB ddarganfod ym mhle yn y wlad mae’r creaduriaid yma’n ymddangos a pha mor aml,” meddai Stephen.

    Fel y llynedd, bydd yr RSPB yn rhannu’r canlyniadau gyda Chadwraeth Amffibiaid ac Ymlusgiaid (ARC), Ymddiriedolaeth y Bobl dros Rywogaethau Bregus (PTES) a Chymdeithas y Mamaliaid i ychwanegu at eu basdata rhywogaethau.  Bydd y canlyniadau’n helpu’r holl gyrff sy’n cymryd rhan i ychwanegu at eu dealltwriaeth o’r bygythiadau sy’n wynebu bywyd gwyllt yr ardd. 

    Neidr ddefaid

    Eleni, ychwanegwyd nadroedd defaid a nadroedd y gwair at y rhestr.  Ymysg y rhywogaethau eraill a fydd yn cael eu harolygu eto mae moch daear, draenogod, ceirw a llwynogod/cadnoaid.  Wrth newid y rhywogaethau o fywyd gwyllt a arolygir bob blwyddyn gellir sefydlu system i sicrhau bod rhywogaethau’n cael eu harolygu o leiaf unwaith bob tair blynedd.  Bydd hyn yn darparu digon o ddata i benderfynu a yw eu dosbarthiad yn newid dros gyfnod o amser. 

    Meddai Marina Pacheco, o Gymdeithas y Mamaliaid:  “Y peth gorau all pobl ei wneud i famaliaid yn yr ardd yw sicrhau pwll neu ffynhonnell barod o ddŵr ar lefel y ddaear a bylchau yn eu ffensys fel bod anifeiliaid fel draenogod yn gallu dod i’w gerddi.  Rydym yn hynod o bryderus ynglŷn â’r cynnydd yn y defnydd o goncrit wrth fôn ffensys gardd oherwydd mae hyn yn rhwystro bywyd gwyllt rhag cael mynediad i’r ardd ac yn lleihau’r cysylltiad rhwng gerddi.”

    Meddai Dr John Wilkinson o Gadwraeth Amffibiaid ac Ymlusgiaid (ARC): “Ychydig o bobl sy’n sylweddoli pa mor bwysig yw gerddi i rai ymlusgiaid ac amffibiaid.  Os allwch chi, bydd creu bin compost yn helpu i ailgylchu gwastraff gardd a chegin yn ogystal â denu nadroedd defaid i ddod i fyw yn y deunydd llysieuol cynnes a phydredig.  Os byddwch yn ffodus efallai y bydd nadroedd y gwair yn dod o hyd i’ch tomen ac yn dodwy eu hwyau ynddi!  Os bydd ymlusgiaid yn dechrau defnyddio eich tomen, dylech osgoi troi’r compost yn yr haf a’r hydref pan fydd nadroedd defaid a nadroedd y gwair yn ymddangos.”

    Meddai Henry Johnson, Swyddog Draenogod, Ymddiriedolaeth y Bobl dros Rywogaethau Bregus: “Unwaith eto, mae’r arolwg enfawr hwn yn dangos i ni pa mor rhyfeddol yw gerddi i fywyd gwyllt.   Mae draenogod yn dal i alw heibio’n gerddi yng ngwledydd Prydain, ac mae hyn yn rhywbeth i’w drysori gan eu bod mewn perygl.  Ni all draenogod hedfan ac mae angen llawer o erddi arnynt i ffynnu felly cofiwch sicrhau bod cysylltiad rhwng eich gardd chi â’ch cymdogion gyda thwll bach (13cm2).”

    Ychwanegodd Stephen Bladwell o RSPB Cymru: “Mae’r arolwg enfawr hwn yn dangos pa mor bwysig yw ein gerddi i gynnal yr amrywiaeth anhygoel o fywyd gwyllt sy’n byw ynddynt.  Mae ychwanegu nadroedd defaid a nadroedd y gwair i arolwg eleni’n gam mawr tuag at gasglu mwy o ddata i’n helpu ni a’n partneriaid adnabod yn y blynyddoedd i ddod a yw dosbarthiad amrywiaeth o rywogaethau o fywyd gwyllt yr ardd wedi newid.  Ein gobaith ni yw gweld mwy o bobl yn helpu i roi cartref i fyd natur yn eu gerddi a’u mannau awyr agored er mwyn dechrau gweld cynnydd yn y bywyd gwyllt yn hytrach na phrinhad.”

    Adar y to oedd y rhywogaeth a gofnodwyd amlaf ledled Cymru heblaw Powys lle’r oedd y titw tomos las ar frig y rhestr.  Mae nifer adar y to wedi cynyddu yng Nghymru er bod y nifer a gofnodwyd yn GAYA ledled gweddill y DU wedi prinhau o dros 20% dros y 10 mlynedd ddiwethaf.  Mae hyn yn adlewyrchu tueddiadau a nodwyd yn yr Arolwg Adar sy’n Nythu (BBS) lle gwelir bod adar y to wedi cynyddu yng Nghymru o dros 95% ers 1995 er eu bod wedi prinhau o dros 10% yn Lloegr ers 1995 (BBS 2013).

    Mae’r RSPB yn gobeithio defnyddio’r data i greu darlun drwyddo draw o ba mor bwysig yw ein gerddi ar gyfer pob math o fywyd gwyllt.  Yna fe all lunio ei chyngor fel bod pobl yn helpu eu hymwelwyr gwyllt i ddod o hyd i gartref, i fwydo ac i fagu’n llwyddiannus.

    Mae Gwylio Adar yr Ardd yn rhan o ymgyrch Rhoi Cartref i Fyd Natur yr RSPB, sydd â’r nod o fynd i’r afael â’r argyfwng cartrefi sy’n wynebu bywyd gwyllt y DU.  Mae’r elusen yn gofyn i bobl ddarparu lle i fywyd gwyllt yn eu gerddi a’u mannau agored eu hunain - un ai drwy blannu planhigion llawn neithdar i ddenu gwenyn a gloÿnnod byw, gosod blwch nythu i aderyn y to, neu greu pwll a fydd yn cynnal nifer o wahanol rywogaethau.  I wybod mwy ynglŷn â sut allwch chi roi cartref i fyd natur yn eich ardal chi ewch i rspb.org.uk/homes 

    Gallwch gofrestru i gymryd rhan yn arolwg Gwylio Adar yr Ardd a dysgu mwy drwy alw heibio rspb.org.uk/birdwatch

     

    Canlyniadau Gwylio Adar yr Ardd 2014: 20 Uchaf Cymru

    Safle

    Rhywogaethau Cymru 2014

        Cyfartaledd Fesul Gardd

     1

    Aderyn y To

    5.5

    2

    Titw Tomos Las

    3.6

    3

    Drudwy

    2.7

    4

    Ji-binc

    2.7

    5

    Aderyn Du

    2.1

    6

    Titw Penddu

    1.6

    7

    Nico

    1.4

    8

    Robin Goch

    1.2

    9

    Jac-y-do

    1.2

    10

    Pioden

    1.1

    11

    Colomen Dorchog

    1.1

    12

    Titw cynffon hir

    0.9

    13

    Llwyd y Berth

    0.9

    14

    Ysguthan

    0.8

    15

    Penloyw

    0.8

    16

    Brân dyddyn

    0.7

    17

    Llinos Werdd

    0.6

    18

    Colomen Wyllt

    0.5

    19

    Pila Gwyrdd

    0.2

    20

    Dryw

    0.2

     

    Y rhywogaethau cyffredin y byddem fel arfer yn eu gweld yn GAYA

    Ffigur 1: Newidiadau yn amlder rhywogaethau cyffredin a gofnodwyd fel rhan o GAYA ers 2003.

    Rhywogaeth

    Newid 2003 - 2014

    Cymru

    DU

    aderyn du

    -12.5

    -20.4

    titw tomos las

    -21.4

    -21.1

    ji-binc

    -28.0

    -31.6

    titw penddu

    -34.3

    -22.0

    turtur dorchog

    -25.6

    -31.1

    llwyd y gwrych

    -20.2

    -24.8

    titw mawr

    -18.7

    -14.7

    llinos werdd

    -69.5

    -70.3

    aderyn y to

    2.0

    -21.9

    pioden

    -12.7

    -3.9

    robin goch

    -21.7

    -19.5

    bronfraith

    -70.6

    -72.6

    drudwen

    -41.9

    -51.4

    ysguthan

    32.2

    27.2

    dryw

    -57.7

    -62.6

     

    Y rhai sy’n diflannu

    3. Er bod poblogaethau nythu bronfreithod yng Nghymru yn ymddangos yn weddol sefydlog yng Nghymru, ers 2003 rydym yn gweld llai na thraean o’r bronfreithod yr arferem eu gweld yn ein gerddi yn ystod GAYA.  Mae’r rhywogaeth hon yn dibynnu’n fawr ar bryfed genwair/mwydod, pryfed a choed/llwyni ffrwythau ac aeron megis afal, draenen wen, draenen ddu ayyb.

    Mae ffrwythau ar lawr yn safle da i lawer o fronfreithod (y fronfraith a’r fwyalchen) a’r ddrudwen yn eich gardd yr adeg hon o’r flwyddyn.  Fe all afalau a gellyg fod yn hanfodol bwysig wrth i’r gaeaf oeri fwyfwy a phan na fydd llawer o fwyd ar ôl yn ein llwyni a’n gwrychoedd. 

    4. Mae’r ddrudwen yn dal yn un o’n hadar mwyaf cyffredin a welwyd yn ein gerddi yn ystod GAYA ond mae wedi prinhau’n drawiadol dros y 10 mlynedd ddiwethaf.  Yn 2003 roeddem yn gweld bron i 5 drudwen fesul gardd a arolygwyd ond yn 2014 roedd hynny wedi gostwng i lai na 3 ym mhob gardd.  Mae’r gostyngiad yn y nifer o ddrudwennod a gofnodwyd yn ystod GAYA yn adlewyrchu’r canlyniadau dychrynllyd a welwn mewn poblogaethau nythu a amlygir gan arolygon eraill fel y BBS (prinhad o -70% ers 1995). 

    5. Mae nifer llinosiaid gwyrdd yn parhau i ostwng ac,  mae’n debyg oherwydd yr haint Trichomonosis, maent yn parhau ar safle 17.  Gallwch helpu i fynd i’r afael â’r haint hwn drwy lanhau eich bwydwyr, byrddau adar, a baddonau adar yn rheolaidd.

     

    Rhai o’r ymwelwyr mwy prin â’ch gerddi (yng Nghymru)

                                        Y nifer o erddi

    Cynffon sidan                           2

    Tylluan wen                               5

    Tylluan frech                             14

    Ehedydd                                   2

    Petrisen                                    6

    Cudyll coch                               30

    Siff-siaff                                   19

    Cnocell werdd                           56

    Titw’r helyg                                65

    Dryw eurben                              89