June, 2012

Skydancer

Skydancer
Skydancer is an exciting new four-year project aimed at raising awareness and promoting the conservation of hen harriers in the north of England.

Skydancer - England's hen harriers

Follow the efforts of RSPB staff during the breeding season, as they attempt to monitor and protect one of England's rarest breeding birds of prey - the hen harrier.
  • Time to fledge

    Thirty years ago I started working for the RSPB on a six month upland bird surveying contract – with the additional challenge of helping to protect England’s only regular nesting hen harriers. The Forest of Bowland was the only stronghold for hen harriers in England in 1982 – it still is. I’ll be contributing a series of guest blogs over the spring and summer and tweeting in real time on @andrefarrar

    In my last post I mentioned a common sandpiper in distress following a summer downpour. I worried that its nest had been washed away – a few days later I was delighted to see a young sandpiper in roughly the same area, so fingers crossed it was one of the survivors. The sudden downpour in my otherwise hot and sunny summer was it stark contrast to the storms of 2012.

    Slightly embarrassingly, I find another hen harrier nest with four plump young sat in it.  It’s the sixth nest I’ve now located (with my team of two volunteers).  The numbers of red grouse seemed good to me – as their young grow larger and stronger, numbers on my transects have increased.

    It was on one of my transects that I found the latest harrier nest – I must have walked within 100m of it half a dozen times.

    The harrier nest I was watching most regularly was a hive of activity as the young exercised their wings – when their parents returned they rushed back in to the heart of the nest platform to grab their share ... they were strong and vigorous, fledging (the point at which they can leave the nest area and start their lives as independent harriers) couldn’t be far off.

    One of the hen harrier chicks hiding in the heather. Photo Andre Farrar

    The hills were suddenly a little quieter as the sheep were rounded up and taken off with their lambs, now only a little smaller than their mothers. With the departure of the sheep the male harrier who had spent the past few weeks endlessly buzzing them to keep them away from the nest, will have more time on his hands ... or wings.

    Follow me on twitter

    We would love to hear your thoughts on the blog and all things Skydancer. To leave a comment, simply register with RSPB Community by clicking on the link at the top right-hand corner of the page. Registration is completely free and only takes a moment. Let us know what you think!

     

  • Update from Bowland

    I really wish I had been able to talk about harriers as much as I seem have been talking about the bad weather this year. Too much of one and really not enough of the other is how I feel about this season!

    That rain at the end of last week really did hit us hard in Bowland. As you’ll see from these pictures the rivers rose to almost bursting points in places.

    Langden beck in spate on Friday 22nd June. © Jude Lane, RSPB

    The usually calm, babbling Langden beck was transformed into a roaring brown torrent, undoubtedly washing away any late nests and as Gav said in his latest blog, causing young chicks to die either from starvation or cold as the parents searched for hard to find food. It wasn’t just species that nest close to the river that were affected either, a couple of our merlin nests, situated on shallow moorland slopes succumbed to the torrential rain, sadly resulting in the loss of young chicks. Fortunately the peregrine chicks, being that much older, had just fledged so were able to get themselves sheltered and presumably just watched on as the water poured off the fells and into the ever rising rivers below.

    The fish pass in the Dunsop valley today (above) and on Friday 22nd June. © Jude Lane, RSPB

    For those of you keen to hear about 74843, you’ll be pleased to hear that she’s still transmitting strongly. She has established herself a relatively small home range of about 8 x 3 km in the Yorkshire Dales over which she hunts by day before roosting in a large bracken bed at night. Although she appears much more settled (as in she's not been taking herself off to Scotland every other week or so!) we can tell from her satellite fixes that she’s not made a late breeding attempt as the location of her fixes and the corresponding mileage have been too active for a breeding female. Maybe next year?  

    We would love to hear your thoughts on the blog and all things Skydancer. To leave a comment, simply register with RSPB Community by clicking on the link at the top righthand corner of the page. Registration is completely free and only takes a moment. Let us know what you think!

  • Just add water

    Guest blog from Gavin Thomas, Bowland Wader Project Officer.

     

    ... is what it says on the mug on my desk - part of the recipe for Lapwing breeding success. But how much water? This is indeed ‘Great weather for ducks’ but also apparently ‘great weather for wading birds’ I’m often told. I have to dispel this myth - waders detest this weather as much as the rest of us do.

    True, wading birds like wet bits - shallow muddy edged pools, scrapes, wet flushes and ditch edges, and a little rain in the spring does keep these wet features topped up - providing ideal conditions for the invertebrate communities that waders feed on. But, prolonged heavy rain and the resultant increasingly regular floods in the breeding season is nothing short of a nightmare for ground nesting birds.

    Those of you who watched Iolo Williams on Springwatch last month picking up Lapwing chick corpses, drowned by flooding on our Ynys-hir reserve in Wales, will have got the message in graphic detail. That scene has haunted many other areas of the UK this spring. Take the entire population of breeding waders at our Ouse Washes reserve in the East Anglian fens for example. This internationally important site, along with the Nene Washes, holds most of the country’s breeding Black tailed Godwits and over a third of all lowland England’s Snipe, all crowded into one area of habitat that (sometimes) remains suitable for them. It is the proverbial all eggs in the one basket scenario.

    Being a flood storage area for vast tracts of agricultural land that surround the reserve, the waders at the Ouse Washes took the hit and every clutch of eggs and young chicks was lost. We are working with the Environment Agency, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust and landowners and farmers close to the reserve to look for other baskets - habitat free from the flooding risk nearby….

    These are lowland wet grassland sites and thankfully here in Bowland, the geography largely protects ground nesting birds from such devastating events. That said, any ground nesting bird that spends prolonged periods off its clutch of eggs in such weather will run the risk of those eggs chilling. Furthermore, for the first few weeks of their life, wader chicks are unable to regulate their own body temperature and need to be brooded by the adults to keep warm. They need to feed regularly too, so prolonged brooding may actually result in the birds dying of starvation. But venturing out to feed into heavy rain through wet vegetation when you are still downy can result in a soaking, a chill and the inevitable. Tough choices eh?

    Not all bad news though. Remember the fencepost-top nesting Oystercatcher in Bleasdale? Well that bird clearly avoided any flooding, plus the host farmer reports that two eggs hatched from its clutch of three. Where there’s a wader there’s a way. Perhaps those that make decisions to build housing estates on floodplains should take note!

    We would love to hear your thoughts on the blog and all things Skydancer. To leave a comment, simply register with RSPB Community by clicking on the link at the top righthand corner of the page. Registration is completely free and only takes a moment. Let us know what you think!