Our work

Our work
You might be surprised to read that our work is far broader than nature reserves and Big Garden Birdwatch. Read more about what else we do.
Results for climate change, adaptation
View more results: All Community | Our work
  • Blog Post: Nature, adaptation and climate change at Bonn

    It’s good to step out occasionally and gain a wider perspective on things, and the three-day Bonn meeting on climate change and nature conservation in Europe was a particularly good occasion. It mixed ecology, policy and economics – ambitious, but the three pillars needed to get things done...
  • Blog Post: Early birds but no worms?

    You won’t find many birds telling you climate change isn’t happening. In a report by the BTO, new evidence is revealed that shows a range of birds are now laying their eggs earlier in the year as a result of climate change. 39 species are laying between 5 and 30 days earlier than...
  • Blog Post: Climate change in Africa - Video

    This is a powerful video presentation that was played at our conference the other week by Moussa Abou Mamouda (from ENDA Senagal & Africa Adapt). Clearly shows how people and nature are already being affected by climate change in Africa. Thanks to colleagues at WWF and Mairi Dupar at CDKN for...
  • Blog Post: Wonderful wetlands, loads of lapwings

    This century, English summers will become hotter and drier on the whole, putting stress on the wonderful wetland habitats that remain in our countryside. Even if we do everything in our power to tackle climate change, further warming is inevitable. That's why the RSPB's ambitious efforts to...
  • Blog Post: Glaciers, rats and 100 million birds

    South Georgia, ice-bound and tucked within the edge of the Southern Ocean, might not be everyone’s idea of a paradise island. Yet it’s waters are biologically richer than those around the Galapagos Islands , and it’s home to over 100 million seabirds . For six species of them, and over...
  • Blog Post: Log jams and early flowering willow take on climate change in the Scottish Borders

    From Jim Densham, Senior Land use Policy Officer, RSPB Scotland Anyone guess what this is? Is it a playground climbing frame? Or a 3-Day-Eventing hurdle from the Olympics? No - it’s a bar apex log jam. And it’s a simple, cost effective measure that farmers in the Scottish borders are using...
  • Blog Post: Stepping stones to the north

    Birds, butterflies, other insects and spiders are using protected areas to help them move north in response to climate change. Perhaps this isn’t surprising, but it’s another good reason to make sure that we cherish and protect our protected areas across the UK, and that we have the resources...
  • Blog Post: Green Travel to Green Places

    Guest Blogger: Jim Densham – Senior Land Use Policy Officer (Climate) at RSPB Scotland. After 7 years of hard work the kind people at the RSPB allow staff to take a sabbatical. Quite a lot of RSPB staff do bird surveys for their sabbatical but whilst I love nature, I’m only an occasional...
  • Blog Post: What the record summer Arctic ice melt might be telling us

    The record breaking summer Arctic ice melt last month got lots of media attention. Doubtless you’ll have seen this, so I’ll just report that that the difference between the new record and the old is about the size of Texas, which has a kind of irony, and leave the facts at that – you...
  • Blog Post: Adapting to change:wildlife and people of the Inner Forth

    Dominated by the Grangemouth oil refinery and Longannet coal-fired power station, the Inner Forth in Central Scotland might seem like an odd place for a vast area of visionary wildlife conservation. But when the RSPB’s UK climate change team came together on a rainy Scottish morning, the Forth...
  • Blog Post: State of Nature and climate change

    State of Nature , a scientific collaboration of 25 UK conservation organisations, saying that our species are in already trouble, my thoughts turned to consider how climate change might be part of that. Especially when this UK report follows a recent global study , suggesting that more than half of common...
  • Blog Post: Biodiversity and people on the front line

    With climate change increasingly affecting wildlife and nature conservation, our new report published with Natural England and WWF-UK shows that the Earth's wildlife and natural systems are already showing significant impacts. It’s a timely to our political leaders - and to us all - just what's...
  • Blog Post: Giving nature a climate-adapted home needs action as well as words

    Government has launched its National Adaptation Programme for climate change in the UK. The plan is a legal commitment in the Climate Change Act (2008) that we and many others fought hard for. We did this because it was clear that our climate was changing and that even if we were successful in meeting...
  • Blog Post: Conservation for carbon and for nature: having our cake and eating it?

    Mitigation or adaptation? Carbon conservation or nature conservation? A recent paper by Chris Thomas and others looks at whether these two things can be balanced effectively. The approach is based on mapping, for carbon and for nature. The maps for conservation importance are produced using ‘zonation’...
  • Blog Post: Pests and marine species moving faster than terrestrial wildlife

    Land based wildlife seems to be responding more slowly to climate change than both life in the oceans, and agricultural pests and diseases, suggest two papers in Nature Climate Change. A new synthesis of observed changes in marine biodiversity reports widespread and systematic shifts which show remarkable...
  • Blog Post: Telling planners and architects all about the birds and the bats

    Zero carbon homes are an important step in the fight against climate change – but modern, efficient building design mustn’t give the cold shoulder to wildlife. Th e RSPB and other conservation partners have joined Bat Conservation Trust in a new guide which help architects and planners incorporate...
  • Blog Post: Warming slowdown an error of stats?

    Scientists at York and Ottawa universities are suggesting that the warming slowdown of the last few years may be incorrect. Their new study suggests that average continued global warming has continued at 0.12°C per decade, rather than the 0.05°C per decade as suggested by the Met Office , NASA...
  • Blog Post: Last night nature helped protect us from the storm

    Lotte Large, RSPB Futurescape Officer, East of England In the aftermath of the highest storm surge since the Great Flood of 1953, communities are now taking stock of the damage to our eastern coastline. As people assess the damage to their homes and businesses, our staff have been doing the same with...
  • Blog Post: Storms, surges and the sea: Coastal Habitats 2100

    Storms, surges and the sea: Coastal Habitats 2100 The RSPB was well represented at a fascinating meeting about what the stormy weather brought to wildlife habitats along the eastern England coast. That’s not surprising given that some of our best known nature reserves are in this area –...
  • Blog Post: Futurescoping our landscape scale conservation

    Alongside our nature reserves and species recovery work, the RSPB has a major landscape scale programme, working with other land interests in more than three dozen large areas of the UK – covering over a million hectares. This programme is called Futurescapes – so it’s apt that I’ve...
  • Blog Post: Action for nature habitats and climate change

    We now know much about how climate change affects wildlife - species such as the Dartford warbler and the bee orchid are moving further north and recent storms have highlighted the vulnerability of coastal and wetland habitats. Yet - how should habitat management respond? A hugely useful practical...
  • Blog Post: From evidence to policy - why so slow?

    Guest blog by David Christian Rose, PhD student University of Cambridge, http://www.geog.cam.ac.uk/people/rose/ Devastating floods in southern England, destructive storms in the Philippines, massive wildfires in Australia: just some of the recent events where climate change is believed to have played...