Our work

Our work
You might be surprised to read that our work is far broader than nature reserves and Big Garden Birdwatch. Read more about what else we do.
Results for wildlife
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  • Blog Post: Toad tales

    Charlie McMurray is an intern at RSPB Scotland working on 'all nature' projects: mammals, amphibians and insects. This is her latest update on natterjack toads. By the beginning of May, the noisy natterjack toads at Mersehead were out in full force for the first time this year. Their loud...
  • Blog Post: Revealing the fortunes of birds: what satellite transmitters tell us

    Revealing the fortunes of birds: what satellite transmitters tell us Here Ian Thomson, RSPB Scotland's Head of Investigations, explains why fitting satellite transmitters to birds of prey is so important and what the data provided tells us about the these birds. A golden eagle chick in Galloway...
  • Blog Post: Can new technology save albatross from extinction?

    Stephanie Winnard, Project Officer for the Albatross Task Force writes: Albatrosses are incredible apex predators, but are vulnerable to bycatch in fisheries. Image by Augusto Silva-Costa, Projecto Albatroz At least 160,000 seabirds are dying in longline fisheries every year. 15 of 22 albatross...
  • Blog Post: Getting ready for Birdfair

    Last week I encouraged everyone to come along to Birdfair, hosted each year in August at the famous Rutland Water Nature reserve, run by our partner the Leicestershire & Rutland Wildlife Trust. Directions to Birdfair can be found here . I am confident you will want enjoy every bit of Birdfair...
  • Blog Post: A sea of birds

    The Scottish Government has recently put forward 10 marine sites to be official designated as protected areas for the seabirds that use them. A public consultation is open now, to get your views about whether they need to be protected. We will be responding and asking that they are all designated as...
  • Blog Post: Join the RSPB at this year's Birdfair

    In one month's time tens of thousands of birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts will be flocking to Birdfair , the largest gathering of nature and bird enthusiasts in the world. It is also a meeting place for many wildlife focussed NGOs and all of the outdoor and nature associated industries –...
  • Blog Post: Nature needs us to do more to cope with climate change

    Different news on climate change: a new climate risk assessment for the UK is published today, by the Committee on Climate Change. Yes, it’s rather gloomy reading – yet also a spur to action. There’s a lot that we can do to avert the worst of the problems, we just need to get on with...
  • Blog Post: Gamebird hunting: why we’re supporting calls ­for it to be regulated

    The Scottish Raptor Study Group has recently lodged a petition with the Scottish Parliament calling for a licensing system to be introduced for gamebird hunting in Scotland. We, at RSPB Scotland, fully support it and we’d like you to support it too. Read our blog to find out why we think it’s...
  • Blog Post: How a bioblitz can help save nature

    How a bioblitz can help save nature Amber Jenkins, RSPB Scotland’s Community Green Space Officer in Edinburgh, gives us the run down on the recent Edinburgh bioblitz and why events like this are so important for connecting people to nature. I think a lot of us are probably guilty of...
  • Blog Post: Seabirds of the Forth

    Allison Leonard is a warden with RSPB Scotland who looks after five reserves in Central Scotland, including the Forth Islands Fidra and Inchmickery. Allison brings us this update on how different seabirds are faring in the Forth this year and tells us about a couple of exciting opportunities for you...
  • Blog Post: Investing in Our Countryside

    Investing in Our Countryside Wildlife across Scotland continues to change, with serious long term declines now evident. So how do we have a greater positive impact on the fortunes of our species at a time when less government support is available? Protected areas for example have been essential...
  • Blog Post: Cooperation on offshore wind development in the North Sea – will the UK join in?

    On Monday 6 th June, the Energy Ministers of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Sweden and Norway signed a “ Political Declaration on Energy Cooperation between the North Seas Countries ”. The UK was notably absent from the declaration signing, which...
  • Blog Post: BirdLife partners across Europe work together to adapt to climate change

    This post was written by Dr Olly Watts, Senior Climate Change Policy Officer Telescopes and binoculars from fifteen European BirdLife partner organisations were trained on two lammergeiers, or bearded vultures, roosting high on the cliff face of a quiet Alpine valley as dusk fell. We’d come...
  • Blog Post: Five facts you should know about red squirrels

    Red squirrels are Scotland’s native squirrel species, instantly recognisable by their distinctive ear tufts, rust coloured fur and bushy tails. The tail is particularly important as it’s used for balance, communication and as a cosy blanket. In Scotland there are around 120,000 red...
  • Blog Post: Little gulls at RSPB Scotland Loch of Strathbeg

    This summer we were able to confirm that the smallest species of gull in the world, the little gull, is nesting with an egg at RSPB Scotland Loch of Strathbeg. It's the first confirmed breeding attempt for little gulls in Scotland ever. Kath Hamper, who works on our north east coastal reserves team...
  • Blog Post: Celebrating National Insect Week

    RSPB Scotland is supporting National Insect Week from 20-26 June - a celebration of some of the smaller creatures in our natural world that is organised by the Royal Entomological Society. If you haven't heard of it before, National Insect Week encourages people of all ages to learn more about insects...
  • Blog Post: I can hear the grass grow

    Hi, I’m Bernie Bell. I got in touch with RSPB Scotland after reading a piece in the organisation’s recent magazine, Scotland news, about the importance of wildflower meadows in the conservation of the great yellow bumblebee. I live on Orkney, where gardening can be difficult, but with a bit...
  • Blog Post: Five facts you should know about nuthatches

    Five facts you should know about nuthatches Nuthatches were once restricted largely to south-eastern England but, during the 20th century, they started spreading north. Nuthatches started breeding regularly in Scotland only in 1989. If you have them visiting your garden, or you've seen them at...
  • Blog Post: Calamitous chorusing

    Charlie McMurray is an intern at RSPB Scotland working on 'all nature' projects: mammals, amphibians and insects. Here is her latest blog on natterjack toads from RSPB Scotland Mersehead. Calamitous chorusing It’s time! April not only brought showers to Scotland, but also lured...
  • Blog Post: How did nature do in the elections?

    The election results are in and the new MSPs are gathering in Holyrood. How did nature and the environment do? They didn’t grab the headlines, but in numerous hustings across Scotland organised by RSPB Scotland, Environment Link and our partners, candidates were put through their paces. The Hustings...
  • Blog Post: Unusual visitor pops in to Lochwinnoch

    How often to do you get to see something new, that you’ve never laid eyes on before? During migration, in spring and autumn, rare or unusual birds are occasionally blown off course and can turn up in places you just wouldn’t expect. One such visitor has recently appeared at our Lochwinnoch...
  • Blog Post: Unravelling what is needed to save the ring ouzel

    Guest blog by Dr. Innes Sim Conservation Scientist at the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science Why are ring ouzels declining? The ring ouzel, sometimes known as the ‘upland blackbird’, is a species of thrush which breeds in the UK uplands and winters largely in North Africa. It’s...
  • Blog Post: What to do if you find an 'abandoned' young bird

    It's common in spring and summer to find young birds sitting on the ground or hopping about without any sign of their parents. But what do you do if you come across one? You might have experienced it yourself. Coming home after walking the dog, you find a confused-looking baby house sparrow...
  • Blog Post: It’s a time of change on Scotland’s cliffs

    Kirsty Nutt explains why now is a perfect time to get out and enjoy Scotland’s seabird cities. It’s a time of change on Scotland’s cliffs The clocks have sprung forward; the evenings are getting lighter and the days warmer. Spring is definitely on its way. And with the shift of...
  • Blog Post: USA biomass fact finding trip: what did I learn?

    So, my biomass fact finding mission to the US is coming to a close. Here are ten things that I learned while I was here: Community members in the Southeastern USA are very concerned about the wildlife, climate and health impacts of the wood pellet industry and its mills. The bottomland hardwood...