July, 2012

Crook of Baldoon

Crook of Baldoon
Do you love our Crook of Baldoon nature reserve or the Wigtown ospreys? Share your thoughts with the community. Or if you're thinking about visiting and would like to find out more, ask away!

Crook of Baldoon

  • No sign of HJ

    After the excitment of last Tuesday, we have not seen any sign of HJ or indeed EP visiting the nest.  The local ravens have been regularly hanging about the nest, and have taken to removing all the twigs that were brought in by the ospreys last week.  We'll just have to keep our fingers crossed for next year and hope that one of the males returns to the nest. 

    After an absense of about a week, the peregrine falcon has made an appearance again today.  Happily sitting in the sunshine on the Tower for Remarkable Raptors day.  At high tide, a large flock of about 200 curlew wheeled over the merse edge and are now happily munching on the exposed mud.

  • Latest on National Breeding Bird Survey

    latest figures from the BTO Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) show that four of our breeding waders have reached their lowest levels since the survey started in the early 1990s.

    declines of 19% for Oystercatcher, 18% for Lapwing, 40% for Snipe and 13% for Curlew.

    Another bird that has recorded major decline in recent years is the farmland bird the Skylark, with a significant 7% decline between 2010 and 2011 , and since the BBS started in 1994 a 20% decline.

    I feel that these figures reflect some of my recording for WeBs counts this year as well. It is without a doubt weather related this year.

     

    Talking to Hannah at the Mull of Galloway today the Guillemots and Razorbills have done badly this year again but the Kittiwakes have so far done a lot better.

      

  • It's all happening here!

    What a fantastic week it's been.  Last Friday evening 14 of us were at the Crook at dusk, bat detectors at the ready, and were rewarded with many signals picked up from the pipistrelle bats which were darting back and forth all around us.  The moth trap set gave us a time to pour over the books on Saturday morning and identify the eight moths which had been caught ( and later released ).  Paul's superb photos show up the beautiful detail which is easily missed by the naked eye.  Then on Tuesday; to enter the osprey viewing room and see a bird sitting on the nest really was the cream on the cake for me.  What a privilege it is to live in such a fantastic spot for wildlife!