Newport Wetlands

Newport Wetlands

Newport Wetlands
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Newport Wetlands

  • Recent sightings 22.07 to 28.07

    Just a quick update on the sightings from last week:

    A bittern was spotted on Wednesday of last week, briefly in flight between the lagoon in front of the hide, and the lagoon at the “dead end” in the copse. It was only reported on this one day though...but it’s a great sign, and hopefully in the future will be a regular sighting!

    A treecreeper was seen in the copse on Sunday, which isn’t particularly unusual but is a nice one to spot, one of my favourite birds.

    Treecreeper by Steve Knell (rspb-images.com)

    There are still lots of insects around, and butterflies in particular are drawing a lot of interest. The Big Butterfly Count is ongoing until 10th August, so I encourage you to take part, it just takes 15 minutes to record any that you see.

    Here's the full list of sightings:

    Avocet, Bar tailed godwit, Bearded tit, Bittern, Black headed gull, Black tailed godwit, Blackbird, Blackcap, Blue tit, Buzzard, Cetti's warbler, Chaffinch, Chiffchaff, Coot, Cuckoo (j), Curlew, Garganey, Goldfinch, Great crested grebe, Great spotted woodpecker, Green sandpiper, Green woodpecker, Greenfinch, Greenshank, Grey heron, Grey wagtail, Herring gull, Hobby, House sparrow, Knot, Lesser whitethroat, Linnet, Little egret, Little grebe, Little owl, Little ringed plover, Little stint, Long tailed tit, Mallard, Marsh harrier, Mediterranean gull, Moorhen, Mute swan, Peregrine, Pheasant, Pied wagtail, Reed bunting, Reed warbler, Ruff, Sand martin, Sedge warbler, Shelduck, Song thrush, Swallow, Treecreeper, Tufted duck, Wheatear, Whinchat, Willow warbler, Wren, Yellow wagtail.

    Blue-tailed damselfly, Cabbage white, Clouded yellow, Comma, Common blue butterfly, Common blue dragonfly, Common darter, Dragonfly larvae, Essex skipper, Gatekeeper, Great pond snail, Green veined white, Holly blue, Large white, Latticed heath moth, Marbled white, Meadow brown, Morning glory plume moth, Peacock butterfly, Rabbit, Red admiral, Ringlet, Small skipper, Small tortoiseshell, Soldier beetle, Speckled wood, Stickleback, Water vole, Water boatman, Water scorpion, Weasel.

  • Summer Holiday Activities and Recent Sightings

    It’s almost time for the school holidays to begin, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to let you know about the events and activities that we are running throughout the summer weeks. Bring your children, bring your grandchildren, make the most of summer and get the kids outdoors!

    We have a number of events aimed at 3 to 12 year olds, which are £5 per child (50% discount for RSPB members) and free for accompanying adults. All of these events must be booked in advance by phoning the visitor centre – they can get fully booked so do it as soon as you can!

    • On Thursday 24th July is the annual Teddy Bears Picnic – bring a picnic and your favourite teddy, and enjoy a morning of stories and games.
    • On every Tuesday from 22nd July to 26th August we are doing pond dipping (Pondemonium!), to explore the underwater world and strange creatures that lurk in our reedbeds.
    • On every Thursday from 24th July to 28th August there is Minibeast Mania which is an opportunity to discover bugs and butterflies living on the reserve.

    On Saturday 26th July and Saturday 30th August it’s our monthly guided walk, suitable for all the family.

    In addition to the bookable events, every day throughout the holidays there are drop-in activities for children. You can borrow a Wildlife Explorer backpack for the day, which includes a pair of binoculars, a bug pot, identification charts, and activity sheets to keep you busy for the whole day. The backpacks are £3.50 to hire for the day, or free to hire for RSPB members. What a great deal, eh?

    You can also pick up an activity quiz sheet for free at the reception – donations welcome!

    Now onto the wildlife sightings. Highlights for the week include Wood sandpiper, Green sandpiper and Spoonbill at Goldcliff lagoons, juvenile Bearded tits still being seen early morning by the lighthouse, and a new butterfly for the reserve: the Essex skipper.

    Essex Skipper by Chris Knights (rspb-images.com)

    Just a quick note to let you know that over the summer holidays we do get very busy so we may not be able to post a blog every single week. We will do the best we can to at least post the recent sightings, but it might not always happen! Apologies in advance if this is the case.

    Here’s the full sightings list:

    Bearded tit, Blackbird, Blackcap, Black-tailed godwit, Blue tit, Bullfinch, Buzzard, Canada goose, Cetti's warbler, Chaffinch, Chiffchaff, Coot, Cormorant, Curlew, Dunlin, Dunnock, Goldfinch, Grasshopper warbler, Great crested grebe, Great spotted woodpecker, Green sandpiper, Green woodpecker, Greenfinch, Greenshank, Grey heron, House sparrow, Kestrel, Linnet, Little egret, Little grebe, Long tailed tit, Magpie, Marsh harrier, Moorhen, Mute swan, Oystercatcher, Pochard, Redshank, Reed bunting, Reed warbler, Ringed plover, Robin, Sand martin, Sedge warbler, Shelduck, Snipe, Song thrush, Swallow, Swift, Tufted duck, Water rail?, Whitethroat, Wood sandpiper, Wren.

    Blue tailed damselfly, Cinnabar moth, Common blue damselfly, Essex skipper, Gatekeeper, Green veined white, Large white, Meadow brown, Narrow-bordered 5-spot burnet moth, Peacock butterfly, Red admiral, Ringlet, Scarlet tiger moth, Small copper, Small skipper, Small tortoiseshell, Speckled wood, Tortoiseshell

    Please note that we take our recent sightings list from the visitor sightings board that anyone can contribute to. This is great as everyone can get involved, but obviously can lead to potential errors too as they aren’t always verified! We try to keep this list as accurate as possible but if you see something unusual feel free to comment here!

  • Baby beardys

    Baby beardys

    There are so many satisfying things about spring and summer.  When the sun decides to put his hat on, the weather can lift spirits.  Butterflies and bees take advantage of nectar as flowers blossom with all their might and birds sing at the top of their voice.  One of the most rewarding experiences however, is the journey that wildlife takes, through the trials and tribulations of raising young.  Most of us are familiar with the lovely creatures on BBC Springwatch by keeping a close eye on chicks through the webcams as they grow up in the nest.  Or the fox cubs as they peer out of the den once they have plucked up enough courage to take a sneaky peek of the outside world. 

    But there is one species, out of all the wonderful creatures that have entered the world here at Newport Wetlands this year that we are most happy with, the bearded tits.  Our star species!  I had previously talked about the juveniles on the reserve near the pontoon bridge (see “Big Wild and Sleepy” blog post 24th June) but it appears that the juveniles are really quite obliging. If you want to see them, the best time to be near the lighthouse is at 9am.  The following photos were taken at that time on Sunday by RSPB members Tim and Rose Smith.

         

    Juvenile Bearded tits by Tim and Rose Smith

    Summer is also a time of change for some our smaller residents and many of what were furry caterpillars have now transformed into beautiful butterflies and mesmerising moths.

    Not all moths fly at night and some of the day flying moths are often confused with being butterflies because of their bright colours.  Here is a photo of a garden tiger moth I took on Saturday, just outside the visitor centre.  Even though it does have bright colours, it is actually a night flying moth but you can see why it is easy to get confused.

    Garden tiger moth by Robert Magee

    Amongst the sightings this week was a Shrill carder bee, which is a very rare bee and creatures that makes this reserve unique.

    Full list of sightings 1st – 7th July 2014:

    Bar-tailed godwit, Bearded tit, Blackcap, Black-tailed godwit, Bullfinch, Buzzard, Carrion crow, Cetti's warbler, Chiffchaff, Coot, Cormorant, Curlew, Dunnock, Goldfinch, Grasshopper warbler, Great crested grebe, Great spotted woodpecker, Green woodpecker, Greenfinch, Greenshank, Grey heron, Grey wagtail, House martin, Kestrel, Lesser whitethroat, Little egret, Little grebe, Long-tailed tit, Magpie, Marsh harrier, Moorhen, Mute swan, Oystercatcher, Pochard, Redshank, Reed bunting, Reed warbler, Sand martin, Sedge warbler, Shelduck, Song thrush, Swallow, Tufted duck, Whitethroat, Wren.

     

    Orchids and other flora:

    Dittander, Grass vetch, Marsh helleborine, Pyramidal, Southern marsh.

    Butterflies, moths, damsels, dragons and squidgy things:

    5 spot burnet moth, 6 spot burnet moth, Black tailed skimmer dragonfly, Blue tailed damselfly, Cinnabar moth, Common blue damselfly, Common frog, Drinker moth caterpillar, Emperor dragonfly, Froghopper, Garden tiger moth, Gatekeeper butterfly, Grasshopper, Green veined white butterfly, Large white butterfly, Meadow brown butterfly, Ringlet butterfly, Scarlet tiger moth, Shrill carder bee, Small skipper butterfly, Small tortoiseshell butterfly, Soldier beetle, Speckled wood butterfly, Straw dot moth.

    Please note that we take our recent sightings list from the visitor sightings board that anyone can contribute to. This is great as everyone can get involved, but obviously can lead to potential errors too as they aren’t always verified! We try to keep this list as accurate as possible but if you see something unusual feel free to comment here.