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Pulborough Brooks

Pulborough Brooks
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Results for Pulborough Brooks, Recent sightings
  • Blog Post: Big water, many ducks

    We did our monthly waterfowl count this morning - tricky due to the awesome extent of the flooding throughout the valley and a bit of early mist, but it was utterly calm which made the counting the ducks/geese/swans etc present fairly straightforward if we able to get to the right place. Impressive numbers...
  • Blog Post: Where is this all headed?

    After another deluge yesterday ( ca.38mm in approximately 18 hrs), flood levels have shot back up again today and are still rising, and it is quite possible that it will reach a similar level to that of 24-25th December. The trail between West Mead and Winpenny hides is flooded and is likely to remain...
  • Blog Post: Flood less deep, nature trail and hides open

    Another sublime morning - completely still and bright sunshine. Hundreds of pintails still on site, mostly on the north brooks where many of the males were doing their best to look fabulous in front of the females. The enormo-flood is dropping, and there are strips of land appearing in front of West...
  • Blog Post: Mirror calm

    Only one phrase could describe the south brooks this morning - mirror calm, under a (finally!) clear sky. Thousands of ducks spread out all over the place were an awesome sight - there were at least 300 pintail on the north brooks 2 days ago, and there seems little reason to suggest that number has changed...
  • Blog Post: On stranger tides

    We're quite used to floods delivering all sorts of assorted rubbish/debris/flotsam to us, but a measure of the extent of the flooding in the Arun valley in recent days could be found on the 'tide line' on the north brooks this morning: hundreds, if not thousands, of turnips. Suprising and...
  • Blog Post: No kittiwakes, yet...

    ...but I'm still looking. The huge area of flood water in the valley has spread the wildfowl out and the recent storms have brought in a fair number of gulls to feed on whatever the floods have washed up, but I've yet to locate anything highly pelagic on site, although a single brent goose was...
  • Blog Post: 3.1.14

    Quick summary of the current situation - the nature trail is flooded around Winpenny hide, Nettley's hide will be inaccessible later today due to rising floodwaters and Fattengates courtyard is closed due to fallen trees, but the rest of the trails/hides/viewpoints remain passable. Yesterday's...
  • Blog Post: Improving, but only slightly

    The nature trail is still flooded between west mead hide (open) and winpenny hide (not open!). Nettley's hide is accessible today (Mon 30th), along with Jupp's view. Please be aware that the flood level may go up or down in the next few days, so this situation may change, particularly with...
  • Blog Post: Amberley yesterday, Pulborough today

    Amberley wildbrooks yesterday (see above) looked very watery with flocks of wigeon, teal, shoveler, pintail, greylag geese and Canada geese spread out across the site. The young marsh harrier that has so far spent all winter in the valley was hunting over the eastern side at about 11.30. In atrocious...
  • Blog Post: Follow that duck

    The brooks are rapidly filling up with water and birds - nothing like a bit of weather to bring some changes. Today there were ca.100 pintail and 80 black-tailed godwits on the north brooks, plus hundreds of teal, wigeon, shoveler, mallard and lapwings all over the site. Five or six ruff (maybe more...
  • Blog Post: Dead, good

    Old oak trees are a feature of the site here, and are very important ecologically, as well as being just awe-inspiringly massive, beautiful and wondrous. They mostly inhabit a world that moves very slowly, but occasionally things happen to them very quickly. This tree, which is by my reckoning perhaps...
  • Blog Post: Fieldfares, colours

    A huge flock of fieldfares were present around west mead early this afternoon - somewhere between 300-400 were present, along with small numbers of redwings and blackbirds. Several bullfinches feeding in the hedges alongside the zigzags, about 20 redpolls noted on the edge of the heath and a raven flew...
  • Blog Post: 14.11.13

    Had a brief walk around the heathland restoration area early this morning. Not much of note on the heath itself, but a clear(ish) sky meant there were plenty birds moving above it- about 200 wood piegons flew south, and several flocks of fieldfares and redwings flew west or dropped into the black wood...
  • Blog Post: The jack

    A jack snipe or two have been showing intermittently from Nettley's hide this week - see Gary's photo was taken on tuesday. A few common snipe have also been using the same area, either providing useful comparitive views or simply confusing the issue, depending on your point of view. Tip - jack...
  • Blog Post: A few more ducks

    The monthly waterfowl count yesterday produced decent counts of wigeon and teal on site - about 750 of each, with ca.400 mallard and a handful of pintail and shoveler. Waders were represented by 150 lapwings and a couple of green sandpipers, a single ruff and more surprisingly, 2 rather late wood sandpipers...
  • Blog Post: 7.10.13

    Ruff, common and green sandpiper present on the north brooks amongst ca.100 lapwings. A late whinchat still present, plus 2 or 3 stonechats from Nettley's hide. The last few days has been good for raptors - the female peregrine has been seen again her usual spot at the hanger, the first hen harrier...
  • Blog Post: Structure

    The last few mornings have been murky, dew-laden affairs, great if you appreciate the beauty of spiders' webs strung over gorse bushes on the heath, but not so great for birds. Fortunately the afternoons have been full of fine September sunshine and there has been lots to see. Large numbers of swallows...
  • Blog Post: 23.9.13

    On the brooks this morning were ca.150 wigeon, 230 teal, 15 shoveler, 175 lapwings, 130 mallard and the usual large numbers of greylag and Canada geese. Overhead passed a steady stream of swallows and house martins, with clearly many thousands of birds on the move south. A few snipe and at least 4 green...
  • Blog Post: The high road

    A seven raptor day today - the stars of the show were at least two hobbys (possibly 4 or 5) that spent much of the middle of the day hunting all over the reserve. Several buzzards and a group of 4 red kites were high (very high in the case of the kites) over the north brooks at about 13.00, whilst peregrine...
  • Blog Post: 16.9.13

    Plenty of summer-autumn-winter change-over going on today, both in terms of birdlife and the weather! A juvenile marsh harrier was hunting across the site (there were two different birds present yesterday), and whilst checking livestock a short-eared owl sprung out of the grass on the south brooks river...
  • Blog Post: Blackcaps, chiffchaffs gather

    Interesting morning (07.30-08.30) around the trail: when I saw a garden warbler, a bird I rarely see in the autumn here, in the hedge alongside the zigzags I thought it might be good. Blackcaps and willow warblers/chiffchaffs were all over the site, and decent number of other common migrants were noted...
  • Blog Post: Check out the HB!

    Highlight of the last few days was an adult male honey buzzard seen and photographed by Jim Langiewicz on saturday - check out the stunning picture on the photos page. Other raptors seen over the last 3 days include marsh harrier, hobby, red kite, kestrel and (of course!) common buzard. Migrants are...
  • Blog Post: 29.8.13

    The hedges and scrub around the site are now stuffed with sloes, blackberries, elderberries, haws and hips and look splendid - not surprisingly lots of migrant birds are taking advantage. This morning around the trail were several blackcaps, willow warblers, chiffchaffs and whitethroats, plus at least...
  • Blog Post: In praise of fleabane

    In a short walk from the visitor centre today, I saw 18 species of butterfly and with a bit more luck/time I might have seen 20. This was entirely due to the big patches of fleabane alongside the trail which are proving highly attractive to a wide range of species - well, pretty much anything that likes...
  • Blog Post: Going north, going south

    Migrants come in all shapes and sizes - there were quite a number of silver ys (one of which pictured above) in the moth trap this morning, and a few migrant hawker dragonflies hunting along the treelines on the edge of the heath and black wood. Willow warblers, blackcaps and a spotted flycatcher noted...