Rye Meads

Rye Meads

Rye Meads
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Rye Meads

  • Update 20 July 2016

    Hello All

    To start with we have kingfisher news! The kingfishers have fledged their second brood yesterday! Five young were seen leaving the bank and hanging around the pool, while the adults were kept busy bringing fish in, excellent. Over the past few weeks the adults have also been mating and clearing out another hole ready for a third brood so we are just waiting for them to start incubating (fingers crossed).

    Garganey by Simon Hummerstone


    Meanwhile, the Draper hide has also been performing well with a few migrants on the move. Over the weekend 3 garganey were loafing with 2 still about today, yetserday 13 black tailed godwit were hanging out on the scrape too, a nice treat. Also present little egret, kingfisher, 6 green sandpipers and a variety of loafing ducks and duck broods including the late breeding tufted duck. The scrape is also home to a good chunk of the 400+ black headed gull chicks fledged from site this year, providing a vocal and visual spectacle.

    Brown hawker and black tailed skimmer along with the odd empereor are buzzing around site in good numbers, while ringlets have emerged in the meadows along trails enjoying this burst of hot weather. 


    In other good news the common terns have done well this year with 25 pairs on the rafts and a further 2 on the draper scrape so a great season for them and some cute chicks for us to enjoy.


    The weekend provided another great experience for one of our visitors, Chinara Cjumanalieva, who was lucky enough to see and photograph a juvenile cuckoo being fed by its diminutive foster parent. Great news that we have successful breeding cuckoo on site.

    Thanks

    vicky

  • Kestrel fledging

    Hi All

    Arriving this morning to an empty kestrel nest box, was quite sad (although we were expecting the 2 chicks to fledge any day) until this little fella peered in the office window. 
    He then proceeded to explore the wildlife garden and compound, where he found lots of bits to climb up. Unfortunately his balance is not great so he kept tumbling to the ground (lucky he had not got too high) so we decided to help him out and propped some planks against the building and stores. Where he is now happily ensconced on top of the wood store. His sibling has been spotted on the pylon occasionally (not sure where he disappears too) and the male has been back with food. A peregrine sitting on the next pylon might be keeping the family a bit quite. But lovely to see them hanging around after fledging.
    The kingfishers are still very active feeding their second brood, which are due to fledge around the 19, 20 July.
    Green sandpiper have returned to the scrape and a pair of lapwing have 3  young.  The ringing group also found a cuckoo chick in a reed warbler nest which is nice to have confirmed productivity of a declining species.  We have also had occasional sightings of a juvenile and an adult peregrine, so they must have bred not too far away too.
  • Floods and hatchings

    Hi All

    A couple of updates for you today.

    Firstly the kingfishers have hatched their second brood, hurrah! The adults have been seen taking fish in to the nest bank today a sure sign that the eggs have hatched.  Currently the fish being taken in are very small, but it will not be long before the parents are coming and going frequently with large fish.  Fledging occurs when the young are 24-25 days old (but can take longer if poor fishing) which takes us to 19 or 20 July.

    Secondly with all the rain over the last week we have excessive amounts of water on sight causing flooding along the paths.  However all are passable with stout foot wear or wellies so come prepared and enjoy puddle jumping.

    Thanks

    Vicky