March, 2012

Titchwell Marsh

Titchwell Marsh
Big skies, a fabulous sandy beach and bird-filled lagoons are just a few of the gems tucked away inside Titchwell's treasure trove of natural delights.

Titchwell Marsh

  • Reading the children's comments made me smile...lovely to see they are interested!

     The above was a comment on our comment board in Parrinder hide earlier this week.

    On the board we ask people to write comments about what has made them smile (or frown) on their visit to the reserve. Below is just a selection of  comments made by children on the board over the last two weeks weeks.

    Avocet’s tails blowing in the wind...

    Birds displaying...

    Going rock pooling...

    I enjoyed doing Spot-it!. Last time I did it I scored 730 points...

    Grey lagged geese because they are very beautiful...

    I was sad to leave because I had one more duck on my list to complete. I found some ducks I had never seen before!...

    It was fab because I saw loads of new birds...

    It was fantastic - it was awesome I got see to see a marsh harrier...

    It is lovely to see children engaged by nature and the environment. The Easter hols have began....why not bring your family down? Their comments and excitement will make you smile as well!

  • Spring has sprung

    Another lovely spring morning and the birds are really responding. Around the carpark there are 2 male blackcaps and 2 male chiffchaffs singing and the marsh harriers are very active displaying over the reedbed. Best of all was a pair of garganey on the fresh marsh.I first heard the birds calling on the new reedbed area before they flew to the fresh marsh. There are plenty of male Cetti's warblers singing around the reedbed, all we need now is for the bittern to start booming.Drake garganey by Tony Gray

  • Owl's about that then?

    For the last couple of weeks we have been lucky enough to have a short-eared owl hunting in the grazing meadow at the southern end of the west bank path.

    It can be seen most afternoons after 3pm and on occasions it has shown astonishingly well, often perching on fence posts just fifty metres from the path.It may even be a left over from the incredible migration spectacle we witnessed last autumn.

    If you are keen to see to see it, then I would come down fairly quickly as it will soon be heading back to the breeding grounds in the north or across in Scandinavia.

    These images were taken by Andy Thompson who volunteers for us on the information desk.