Browse by Tags

Titchwell Marsh

Titchwell Marsh
Big skies, a fabulous sandy beach and bird-filled lagoons are just a few of the gems tucked away inside Titchwell's treasure trove of natural delights.
Results for fresh marsh
  • Blog Post: Unicorns, eruptions and Siberian arrivals

    This morning I just didn’t know what to expect. My first job was to open a sluice and let a little flush of water into the fresh marsh. The wind was pushing what little water there was up to the eastern end of the lagoon, concentrating birds at the furthest point from viewing. The little ‘flush’...
  • Blog Post: Winter BEE gone

    Despite the dull cloudy conditions and a nagging cold easterly wind, I have just seen my first bumblebee of the spring along the main path. I also get the feeling that the birds know the better weather is not too far away. The black headed gulls, lapwings and redshanks are all starting to display on...
  • Blog Post: In the dock

    In 2010, as part of the Titchwell Coastal Change Project we carried out some extensive improvement works to the fresh marsh. As well and creating and re-profiling islands we removed the encroaching reed from the edges. This reed was starting to take over making it difficult to manage and reducing viewing...
  • Blog Post: 2 ...., 5 ...., 11 ...., 21 ...., 26 ....

    Last week, the first avocet nest, (‘Twiggy’ as she was affectionately called for her nest DIY skills), hatched 4 fluffy little chicks. There is now a grand total of at least 26 avocet chicks loose on the freshmarsh. Parent avocets (with 8 legs) can be seen close to the Parrinder hide brooding...
  • Blog Post: Sightings for week 28th September to 5th October

    This week has seen good daytime conditions. On Monday we had a pied flycatcher, blackcap, yellowhammer and good sightings of bullfinches in the woods between the car park and the (new) East trails. There have also been high numbers of jays on the reserve, with up to 25 being seen in the the same area...
  • Blog Post: ANK, who are you?

    A couple of weekends ago, one of our hide helpers Tony Gray found this colour-ringed ringed plover feeding on the fresh marsh. Over recent weeks we have seen an increase in birds feeding on the fresh marsh, a sure sign that autumn is approaching and the birds are starting to move south from their breeding...
  • Blog Post: Spoonbill senorita!

    If you have visited Titchwell recently, you may have seen the fantastic pair of spoonbills that are wading around at the moment. Any bird whose beak resembles a piece of cutlery is worth a view in my opinion, but what's also interesting is the ring around one of the spoonbills' legs. This...
  • Blog Post: It’s the final countdown

    It is not an open air concert by the 80’s rock band Europe (unfortunately) but start of the final phase of work on the Titchwell Coastal Change Project. On Monday August 8th the diggers will arrive and work can start. The project is due for completion by the end of October but we are hopeful...
  • Blog Post: Two ‘firsts’ for Titchwell

    It’s not very often you can say that these days especially when it comes to birds. Before you get too excited, it involves species that have already been recorded here. While carrying out our woodland bird survey last week, I was walking through Willow Wood (by the dead trees if you are looking...
  • Blog Post: Not just making up the numbers...

    Last week, as I was working along the West bank path, I was stopped by a lady who asked me what “that flock of smaller birds” was. I suggested that they were probably starlings. “Oh”, she said and started to walk away looking for something else to watch. “Have you seen the...
  • Blog Post: Ray's Rambles: Death in the night

    The first thing I do every morning when I arrive at Titchwell is to check the gents toilet walls for insects and spiders. (Luckily not many people have witnessed this odd behaviour!) Apart from the potential for losing friends, it has netted me several species on my wildlife list, the latest two being...
  • Blog Post: Stormy!!!

    Along with wet, windy, horrible, unsettled and autumnal are all words that could describe the weather over the last couple of weeks. Looking back 12 months, we were in the grip of an icy blast but recently it has been series of stormy Atlantic depressions. Despite the conditions not being ideal for...
  • Blog Post: Pretty flamingo

    Picture the scene...I was walking along the east bank heading out to my survey point when a small flock of shelduck came over the bank. A large bird was with them and getting my bins onto it I was shocked to see it was an adult greater flamingo!! I radioed the rest of the team and at least two of them...
  • Blog Post: Flicking, scraping, and generally fussing avocets

    It’s all kicking off on the islands in our fresh marsh pool. If you turn your binoculars eastwards from the Parrinder Hide or west bank path you will see dozens of these monochrome marvels scratching and scrapping, chasing off geese and gulls and generally causing a fuss as they begin nesting...
  • Blog Post: Close up 'summer teal'

    Summer teal is one of the local names for the garganey. Similar in size to the common teal and a summer visitor, it is a pretty good name. The majority of garganey arrive back in the UK during March and April although the first migrants can arrive in the south as early as Ferbuary. Most of the European...
  • Blog Post: Spot a crake

    I have had great fun out of the office this morning getting wet and muddy opening up some areas of reed near the Island Hide. The plan is that water rails, young bearded tits or even a rare spotted crake may use this sheltered area to feed in this autumn. The area has been cut so that is can be viewed...
  • Blog Post: Go Avocets Go!

    After getting off to a dodgy start when the first nest was predated, the avocets are now running with leaps and bounds as the number of active nests on the freshmarsh reaches 30! Avocets will lay up to four eggs at 1 to 2 day intervals but will not start incubating until the complete clutch has been...
  • Blog Post: Day 106 - What a beast!

    What is the beast appearing out of the reedbed? Well it's the first weapon of choice in our battle against the reed encroachment on the fresh marsh. As part of this years coastal change project we are improving the habitat on the fresh marsh. To do this we are employing some very specialist...
  • Blog Post: Amazing waders

    Following our colour-ringed ringed plover sighting back in September, the arrival of a colour ringed little stint on the fresh marsh recently got us searching the Internet again for information. Messages on birding forums and Twitter revealed that a similar bird had been seen at Spurn Point in Yorkshire...
  • Blog Post: Can we beat the record this year?

    Well with a bit of careful management here and there we will give it a good go... So what am I talking about I hear you ask? Over the last couple of winters our wildfowl numbers have been on the increase. Since 2009 our peak teal count has risen from just over 900...
  • Blog Post: Day 122 – Kori makes a mess!

    T he floating excavator has been doing its worse over the last couple of weeks. Now that the reed has been cut, the main job of removing it can start. Reed can be a very invasive plant species if the growth is left un-checked and unfortunately that is what has happened on the fresh marsh. The reed has...
  • Blog Post: Awesome autumn waders

    The autumn wader migration is now in full swing and the fresh marsh has been ‘hooching’ with birds this week. Numbers have been building steadily but yesterday afternoon our regular reserve count produced fantastic numbers. With good viewing conditions and light winds the fresh marsh was...
  • Blog Post: Day 112 – The beast comes to life

    After a long wait, Year 2 of the Coastal Project started in earnest today. The floating excavator rumbled into life this morning and headed out through the reedbed onto the fresh marsh. I must admit, it was a slightly surreal sight sat in the hide watching a 30 tonne machine crossing the lagoon and...
  • Blog Post: Where has all the water gone?

    "Why are the water levels so low?" "Why are the water levels so high?" These are questions you always get asked when working on a wetland. Currently the water levels on the fresh marsh are low. Why? We have target water levels for each month/season, in each area of the reserve...
  • Blog Post: Cold but very cool

    It was definately one of those colder spring mornings today, but the birds were going to be cool! With a strong north-easterly breeze and temperatures not much above eight degrees it felt more like a spring day in northern Scotland. Thankfully the birds also turned out to be more like those of a northern...