Titchwell Marsh

Titchwell Marsh
Big skies, a fabulous sandy beach and bird-filled lagoons are just a few of the gems tucked away inside Titchwell's treasure trove of natural delights.
Results for surveying
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  • Blog Post: Booming cracking photo

    Since the confirmation of an active bittern nest over the Jubilee Weekend we have been fortunate to have the female feeding in the borrow pits by the main path. Attracted by the large amount of rudd that are present in the pools, she has been showing well at times. This photo, taken recently from the...
  • Blog Post: Easy Tiger...

    This week saw the first Dune Tiger beetle survey at Titchwell and what a glorious day it was! The Dune Tiger beetle Cicindela maritima is a sun-lover (let’s face it who isn’t!), so we waited for the sun to get its hat on and headed down the beach. The Dune tiger beetle is one of just five...
  • Blog Post: An exciting day!

    A very early start was rewarded with the first confirmed bittern booming in the reedbed. As soon as I arrived, the bird started booming and continued, every few minutes, for the next hour. While I was in position, a male grasshopper warbler was 'reeling' near the dead trees and I could hear a...
  • Blog Post: Better late than never

    The weird weather around this spring has played havoc with the breeding season but finally things are starting to happen. The poor weather in April and May has set back the breeding season by several weeks so we are only just starting to see some interesting activity. After last years peak, avocets...
  • Blog Post: Needle in a haystack

    What with all the wind and rain, the survey season has got off to a frustratingly slow start this year. Fewer avocets have arrived at the reserve compared to last year and as a result we have a lower nest count, which currently stands at eight on the freshwater marsh. The first avocet nest has hatched...
  • Blog Post: Dragons, tigers and the emperor

    Not only have we been enjoying the early spring warmth but is has been a great period for insects. Down on the beach in the last couple of days we have been seeing this cracking beast - the dune tiger beetle ( Cicindela maritima). This beetle is one of the rarest species that occurs on the reserve...
  • Blog Post: Spring has finally sprung

    After what seems like such a long winter it has been great this last week to see a real arrival of summer migrants. At this time of year the most obvious are the warblers and the hirundines (swallows and martins) As soon at the wind moved into the south there were large numbers of swallows, house and...
  • Blog Post: What a difference a few days make

    Following the dodgy weather of the Easter break, back to work and conditions improve! Not a bad thing for us as we are now into the thick of the breeding season survey work. With calm conditions this morning we have been able to get out and check the reedbed for bitterns and bearded tits. Unfortunately...
  • Blog Post: Two ‘firsts’ for Titchwell

    It’s not very often you can say that these days especially when it comes to birds. Before you get too excited, it involves species that have already been recorded here. While carrying out our woodland bird survey last week, I was walking through Willow Wood (by the dead trees if you are looking...
  • Blog Post: Ironman competition?

    Well that is what is feels like sometimes when we are surveying redshank on the saltmarsh! This morning we completed the first round visits to the Brancaster and Thornham saltmarshes. It is not one of the easiest surveys to carry out as we have to cross the large tidal creeks which vary from narrow...
  • Blog Post: Another one of the warden’s `nice little jobs`

    Being the assistant to our long-standing and much esteemed warden a lot of his `nice little jobs` tend to come my way. This week it was “just go along to the fen meadow and count how many orchids there are”. Now you might think “well that’s not a bad job”. Have you seen...
  • Blog Post: Harrier roost counts......done

    As part of a national monitoring scheme run jointly by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and the Hawl and Owl Trust, we have been counting the harriers that roost on the reserve over the last winter. The main aim of the scheme is to get an accurate assesment of the number of hen and marsh harriers...
  • Blog Post: Flicking, scraping, and generally fussing avocets

    It’s all kicking off on the islands in our fresh marsh pool. If you turn your binoculars eastwards from the Parrinder Hide or west bank path you will see dozens of these monochrome marvels scratching and scrapping, chasing off geese and gulls and generally causing a fuss as they begin nesting...
  • Blog Post: Go Avocets Go!

    After getting off to a dodgy start when the first nest was predated, the avocets are now running with leaps and bounds as the number of active nests on the freshmarsh reaches 30! Avocets will lay up to four eggs at 1 to 2 day intervals but will not start incubating until the complete clutch has been...
  • Blog Post: Booming marvellous

    I have great news to bring you from the reedbed. Over the last couple of weeks we have noticed an increase in bittern activity around the reserve. One of our volunteers noticed several flight into a specific area of the reedbed so we decided to head out onto the reserve to check it out. Thanks to...
  • Blog Post: The first of many

    With all the dodgy weather about recently, the forecast for this morning looked decent so Georgie and I took the opportunity to get our first survey done. Despite still being early in the season, it is time to start listening for bitterns. A pre-dawn visit ( we were up at 4am) is required but despite...
  • Blog Post: Spring is in the air

    We made the most of the decent weather this morning and got out to complete the first of our woodland bird surveys. Although it was fairly quiet (no blackbirds heard) there were at least 10 chiffchaffs singing in the carpark/Meadow Trail area. Large birds were making the most of the thermals and a...
  • Blog Post: `Raggedy Ann`and the story of the marsh harriers

    It’s April 2013 and the annual marsh harrier surveys start in earnest. Reserve staff and volunteers survey the freshwater reedbed and the tidal reedbed over the east bank from fixed monitoring points looking for any signs of breeding activity. This can include sky-dancing, food exchanges between...
  • Blog Post: Where have the harriers gone...?

    A lot of our work over the last 10 days has involved assessing the infrastructure damage to both Titchwell and Snettisham. Now the full picture is becoming clearer, we can start to look at the impact on the wildlife of both sites. The true scale will take a while to assess properly but early indications...
  • Blog Post: June 2014 with the Titchwell team

    Throughout the four weeks of June at Titchwell Marsh, I experienced laughter, hard work, challenge and adventure. The month was filled with blood, sweat and tears along with a whole load of sun cream and insect repellent. From digging and building to watching and listening, I gained skills in so many...