Radipole Lake

Weymouth Wetlands

Weymouth Wetlands
Do you love our nature reserves at Radipole Lake and Lodmoor? Share your thoughts with the community. Or if you're thinking about visiting and would like to find out more, ask away!

Radipole Lake

  • Radipole Lake's Furry Critters

    We have been lucky enough to see sightings of some of our more elusive shy furry creatures on both our reserves and we have photographic evidence thanks to some of our visitors.

    Fox on Radipole Lake

    Fox on Radipole Lake

    Photo Credit: Fox Images by Nicki Maslen

    The Fox has been seen from our Discovery Centre window several times cautiously stalking the birds much to the delight of our visitors, particularly the children.  The Fox is likely to be a cub born this year.

    Otter on Radipole Lake

    Otter on Radipole Lake

    Photo Credit: Otter Images by John Wall

    Last week, Otters were seen 5 out of 7 mornings between 5:00 a.m. and 7.45 a.m., but also from the Discovery Centre windows at 3.30. p.m and at dusk. They are probably this years cubs. There may be two cubs, possibly 3 cubs. 

    Badgers on Lodmoor

    Photo Credit: Image by Paula Redmond

    The Badgers were seen over at Lodmoor. They are often sighted regularly on the Creatures of the Night Walks.

    For the latest sightings, contact Radipole Lake Discovery Centre, details below or pop in and see us. Hot and cold refreshments, snacks and ice creams available.

    Telephone: 01305 778313

    E-mailWeymouth.reserves@rspb.org.uk

    Websitewww.rspb.org.uk/radipolelake

  • Fifty Shades of Pink

    Well, maybe not quite that many shades. During the summer months of July and August, Radipole's hedgerows have a distinct pinky-purpley tinge to them. Below are the wild flowers you can currently see on the reserve, in their various shades of pink and purple.

    Great Willowherb

    Purple Loosestrife

    Great Willowherb also know as Codlins-and-Cream is a tall plant and easily recognised with its large flowers and softly downy stalk and seed pods. It grows in the damper hedgerows often alongside the equally tall Purple Loosestrife with its four-sided stem

    Great Willowherb and Brimstone

    Great Willowherb attracts butterflies and insects, here with a Brimstone Butterfly.

     Marsh Woundwort

    Marsh Woundwort is another tall plant of damp hedgerows often growing in large colonies. 

     Hemp Agrimony

    Hemp Agrimony is also abundant, its dense small flower heads attract butterflies.

    Spear ThistlePyramidal Orchid

    Spear Thistle attracts insects with its large flowers, it is easily recognisable with its winged stems and yellow tipped spines. The Pyramidal Orchids are now starting to go over, this year's count was 18.

    Red Bartsia

    Red Bartsia is a much smaller plant that grows in dry places. These plants were likely to have been brought on to the reserve as seeds when the paths were re-laid.

    Strawberry Clover

    Strawberry Clover is much smaller than the Red Clover and easily recognisable by its seed heads which look more like raspberries. It can be found on the edge of the paths near the boardwalk down to the North Hide. This plant is often found in damp places near the sea.

    Birds are quiet at the moment though we are getting large numbers of Canada Geese, Grey Herons and Coots on the lake in front of our Discovery Centre. Little Egrets are coming in close to the Centre windows offering good views. and the Mute Swan families are growing up fast. The Swifts and Swallows are still around. There was a Green Sandpiper at the North Hide. Butterflies seen in the last few days include the Painted Lady, Red Admiral, Small White and Brimstone.

    For the latest sightings, contact Radipole Lake Discovery Centre, details below or pop in and see us. Hot and cold refreshments, snacks and ice creams available.

    Telephone: 01305 778313

    E-mailWeymouth.reserves@rspb.org.uk

    Websitewww.rspb.org.uk/radipolelake

  • WaderFest at Weymouth Reserves and other Recent Sightings

    July is the the time when we starting noticing the changes in birds and flowers which signals that we are advancing towards late Summer/Early Autumn. This month has been warm and dry, water levels are slightly lower than normal, therefore more muddy areas have been exposed which means lots of waders visiting Weymouth! Many of the waders are now on passage and juveniles are fledging and exploring.

    Common Sandpiper

    Our WaderFest began on 7th July with the arrival of 2 Little Ringed Plover juveniles and on the 8th July 29 Black Tailed Godwits were counted. On 14th July Common Sandpipers, Black Tailed Godwits, Dunlin, Lapwings, 7 Redshank and the first Snipe was seen over on Lodmoor. Green Sandpipers arrived on 21st July and a Wood Sandpiper was seen on 25th, 26th and 27th July. The Oystercatcher pairs on both reserves have successfully raised 2 chicks each.   The Common Terns on Lodmoor started fledging on 14th July to date,  20+ juveniles have been counted.

    Black Tailed Godwits

    The Little Ringed Plovers, Green Sandpipers and Black Tailed Godwits are still regularly being seen at the moment.

    Other notable sightings this month:

    13th July - 2 Red Kites at Radipole Lake

    18th and 19th July - a Great White Egret on Lodmoor

    An Otter with 3 cubs has been seen several times at Radipole in the evenings.

    For the latest sightings, contact Radipole Lake Discovery Centre, details below or pop in and see us. Hot and cold refreshments, snacks and ice creams available.

    Telephone: 01305 778313

    E-mailWeymouth.reserves@rspb.org.uk

    Websitewww.rspb.org.uk/radipolelake