Weymouth wetlands

Weymouth wetlands
Do you love our nature reserves at Radipole Lake and Lodmoor? Share your thoughts with the community. Or if you're thinking about visiting and would like to find out more, ask away!
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  • Blog Post: Spare us the Cutter

    Visitors to Radipole last week may have noticed a commotion coming from the ditches and the sound of machinery chugging through the reeds; some might also remember hearing the same thing last autumn. In a couple of places it looks as if a small tank has barged through the reeds, crossed the path and...
  • Blog Post: Couldn't have gone any better!

    At the start of yesterdays ‘Discover Radipole Lake’ walk, I perhaps rather foolishly asked everyone if there was something in particular anyone really wanted to see. Names such as Bearded Tit, Bittern, Kingfisher were all mentioned and I thought to myself, "Oh no... have I accidentally...
  • Blog Post: The Big Push

    Strolling along, minding my own business... I spotted something familiar among the Fleabane and grasses beside the Radipole hide trail last week. It was (and still is) a Wasp Spider (Argiope bruennichi), an unmistakeable species with an abdomen banded with vivid black and yellow stripes, which inspired...
  • Blog Post: It's not grim up North Hide.

    North Hide on Radipole has provided some pretty amazing birds over the past few weeks and there is virtually always something of note to hold one's attention. The much publicised glossy ibises seem settled into Radipole life and North Pool is a favoured haunt allowing the capture of images such as...
  • Blog Post: Spring is on the move at Radipole

    Now that January is behind us and hopefully the icy blast that it brought us, I had a wander around Radipole's footpaths to look for signs of spring on this first day of February. The Winter Heliotrope is now in full flower having recovered from the icy blast last...
  • Blog Post: The Lovin' Spoonbill.

    Hot on the heels of Radipole's ibises, Lodmoor is now playing host to a scarce exotic of its own, (from the same Threskiornithidea family) in the unmistakably cartoonish shape of a spoonbill. We are accustomed to having one or two spoonbills drop in from time to time and on one occasion we had five...
  • Blog Post: Line 'em up

    Spending many hours on Chesil Beach watching over the little tern colony over the last two months, it was inevitable that at some point my jumbled mind would turn to the matter of how many pebbles form the 18 mile long shingle bank, and furthermore, how far would they reach if laid side by side in a...
  • Blog Post: A Skulking LBJ (...with occasional exhibitionist tendencies).

    One of the signature birds of the Weymouth Wetlands is the Cetti’s warbler – a ‘little brown job’ with an ‘often heard seldom seen’ reputation for leading birders on a merry song and dance. Frequenting dense undergrowth into which their subtle plumage cannily blends...
  • Blog Post: The Nick Quintrell Memorial Evening

    The evening of Tuesday 30th October saw colleagues and friends of Nick Quintrell gather in the Visitor Centre to remember and celebrate his life. Nick's sister Tammy and her children, along with Mazie, visited the reserve earlier in the day. The children participated in the half term events laid...
  • Blog Post: Hanging Around

    "Big Freeze" and "Arctic conditions" - it seems to me that there's a certain inevitability about the way such phrases appear among some sections of the media when we are about to experience not unfamiliar winter weather conditions in er... winter. However this time it has indeed...
  • Blog Post: I'm down here!

    We made a quick trip over to Lodmoor after work yesterday to check for, among other things, the presence of a cattle egret that had ben reported earlier. Disappointingly, it wasn't on view but it was a fine afternoon for scanning the marsh for anything of interest. Whimbrel and common terns put in...
  • Blog Post: A Water Harrier..?

    In just a few years the marsh harrier - it could be argued - has become the signature bird of Weymouth Wetlands having successfully bred twice on each reserve since 2009 following a Dorset-wide breeding absence of almost half a century. The early weeks of 2012 have seen a steady stream of harrier activity...
  • Blog Post: Spring has Sprung

    The plants are beginning to move and show themselves as the days are getting longer. As I walked through Radipole this morning I came across a patch of Sweet Violets in full flower. This is our only fragrant violet. Next was a hawthorn tree in full leaf. On closer inspection there...
  • Blog Post: Coming soon

    Regular visitors to the reserve cannot fail to have noticed that the Visitor Centre has been closed for some time now, and you may be starting to wonder when it will be opening again. Just to give you some background, the RSPB decided sometime ago that the centre needed a refurbishment, to make the building...
  • Blog Post: Pinging back from the brink.

    The past couple of years has seen breeding bearded tit numbers fall quite markedly on Radipole in particular. Last year we could only confirm one pair for certain on the reserve although Lodmoor fared slightly better. The reasons for these declines are likely to be meteorological with the atypically...
  • Blog Post: They're behind you...!

    As you may know we have been attempting over recent months to film otters at Radipole. In practise this has meant identifying sites that they frequent (as indicated by recent footprints and a liberal scattering of fragrant otter poo nearby) and then installing a camera trap in the hope that our quarry...
  • Blog Post: Guess who's coming to dinner.

    Here at Weymouth Wetlands we have probably given the impression once or twice that we hold moths in high esteem for their delicate beauty, benign demeanour, cute little faces and intriguing names. The recent wet weather hasn’t been terribly conducive to moth-trapping and the quite sensibly named...
  • Blog Post: Check out this cutie!!

    Naomi - our most esteemed and knowledgeable plant recorder, (AKA Angelica in blog-land), was treated to amazing views of one of our most common mammals whilst out botanizing last week. The wood mouse is largely nocturnal and not normally so cocksure as to provide fellow mammalians with such prime photo...
  • Blog Post: Is it a otter? Is it a Bearded tit? No! It's a man on a big machine!

    Recent visitors to either Lodmoor or Radipole may have been wowed with some wonderful wildlife in the past few weeks. There was a spectacular purple heron at Radipole a few weeks ago, looking a bit wacky and alternative. These relatives of the grey heron are ever so slowly moving up into the UK and have...
  • Blog Post: Big Pink

    For a few nights in the run-up to the recent flood, whenever the weather looked suitable we set up the moth trap in the back garden, which is very close to the Radipole reserve. Some nights were more productive than others, depending on the weather, but a couple of attempts gave us a few interesting...
  • Blog Post: Beardies on the boardwalk

    If there’s one species of bird which Radipole is famous for it must be the Bearded Tit. Not a day goes by that a visitor doesn’t come into the Discovery Centre and ask us about them. Back last winter you may remember us mentioning some reed cutting in preparation for thatching the roof...
  • Blog Post: You can’t beat a bit of Bully!

    If push came to shove and I was forced to definitively name my number one British bird the answer, almost invariably, would be the bullfinch, (while acknowledging the relative merits of both the starling and the shoveller). I can remember how, when gazing out of my bedroom window as a kid, the sight...
  • Blog Post: I wonder which ones the male...

    We’ve previously blogged about our rather feminine looking male Marsh Harrier but a picture taken today by regular visitor Steve Carey proves that his femininity is restricted only to his plumage. Marsh Harrier activity has been difficulty to keep track off this spring due to the comings and goings...
  • Blog Post: Steppin' Out

    Invertebrate life must have taken a bit of pounding during the recent rains and flooding – anything that couldn’t fly or crawl to a dry refuge quickly enough would presumably have met a premature and soggy end. With this in mind it was heart-warming to see the evidence of one uninterrupted...
  • Blog Post: Something in the air

    Another colourful point of interest for those who peer into the lower tiers of greenery, as well as scan the skies and trees for the slightest movement, has been the emergence of some spectacular moths along the start of the hide path at Radipole. Over the last couple of weeks, the translucent papery...