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  • Blog Post: Fish surveys, fledglings and photography opportunities

    So the end of our Black-headed gulls time at the Oysterbeds is now drawing to a close, with once downy, fluffy chicks now grown into fully fledged and flying adults. This fluffball-to-fledgling process takes a mere 35 days – just think of all the additional time humans would have if it were that...
  • Blog Post: Poster - Week ending 22nd July 2016

  • Blog Post: Saltholme Hide the place to be

    Saltholme Hide is the place to be just now as there are over 30 noisy Black-tailed Godwits in front of the hide, along with Ruff, Dunlin, Common Sandpiper and our very slowly developing Avocet chick. Black-tailed Godwit by Mark Stokeld And on the way to the hide, make sure you see the first of...
  • Media: Some less cyber inclined flappy things... Mating Common Blue Butterflies

    Polyommatus Icarus – AKA Common Blue Butterfly
  • Blog Post: Some highlights -12th to 30th June 2016.

    A rural scene across the Buttercup meadows.. As the warm weather continued, although with some rainfall, young birds and butterflies were very much in evidence on the Reserve. Young Tree Sparrows, Chaffinches, Blue; Great and Coal Tits were numerous. Greenfinch (3 juvs), Bullfinch(3 juvs), Robins...
  • Blog Post: Hope Farm: the return of the fat bird of the barley

    Regular readers of this blog will be well aware of the fantastic success that we have had at Hope Farm with increasing key farmland breeding bird populations since 2000: skylarks quadrupled, linnets quintupled, yellowhammers doubled, lapwings, yellow wagtail and grey partridge all colonizing the farm...
  • Blog Post: Poster - Lily Pool, 16th July 2016

  • Blog Post: Poster: Marsh Fritillary sightings.

  • Blog Post: It's a small world

    Being out and about on the reserve doesn’t mean always having to look for birds. Look down and around and there’s usually something moving about whether it’s crickets, ladybirds, bees, butterflies or bettles. Black and yellow longhorn beetle by Kate Thorpe Lesser stag beetle...
  • Blog Post: Nature needs us to do more to cope with climate change

    Different news on climate change: a new climate risk assessment for the UK is published today, by the Committee on Climate Change. Yes, it’s rather gloomy reading – yet also a spur to action. There’s a lot that we can do to avert the worst of the problems, we just need to get on with...
  • Media: Egrets at RSPB Burton Mere

    Beautiful Egrets in the trees at Burton Mere
  • Media: Egrets at Burton Mere

    A group of Egrets at Burton Mere on the Wirral along the river Dee.
  • Blog Post: Poster: Sightings - Week Ending 9th July 2016.

  • Blog Post: Marsh Harrier Update

    Now is a good time to come to Radipole Lake and Lodmoor to see our resident Marsh Harriers. Both pairs have successfully bred this year with 3 juveniles each so potentially we can see 10 Marsh Harriers on the wing. There were very good views of the Harriers in front of the North Hide lunchtime calling...
  • Blog Post: Time for another family

    As you walk through Haverton Gate listen for the sound of a large grasshopper coming from a patch of scrub in the Wildflower Walk loop. The sound is in fact a Grasshopper Warbler, and it is singing now because the poor bird has decided to go for a second brood. Grasshopper Warbler at Haverton gate...
  • Blog Post: A plastic globe – how one local beach clean can open up your eyes to a global problem

    The beach clean On Wednesday 29 th June, the RSPB team for Langstone Harbour joined up with The Conservation Volunteers (TCV) to tackle the beach alongside the Hayling Island Oysterbeds, in a bid to try and rid it of as much rubbish as possible. This was no easy feat, as the beach is covered in tiny...
  • Blog Post: Summer Walks at Radipole Lake

    Radipole Reedbed Ramble Monday 4 July to Monday 12 September 2.30 pm-4.30 pm Price: £3 per person Booking essential Join us for a guided series of walks and activities to help you feel comfortable & confident in the outside environment. We'll be enjoying the natural habitat...
  • Blog Post: Butterflies, Wildflowers and Hay Meadows - 25th June 2016

    Having chatted with the volunteers on duty today at the Wetlands Centre and armed with the latest sightings on the Reserve - the Discovery Field, with its wildflower meadows, seemed to be the most attractive option. Birds generally, had stopped singing and were getting on with rearing their young...
  • Blog Post: And the winners are....

    We're very excited to be able to announce the winners of our Doric Meadows Poetry Competition that we ran as part of the Save our Magnificent Meadows project. There were three categories in the competition – 11 and under, 12 to 18 years, and 19 and over – which closed on 30 May. The...
  • Blog Post: The benefits of being a warden

    One of the joys of being a warden is being on the reserve in the early mornings. I noticed this female Marsh Harrier on the gauge board in the Wildlife Watchpoint cut this morning as I entered the hide. Ed brought the reserve camera and managed to get this shot as I slowly opened a shutter. Just...
  • Blog Post: Come and see the Avocet chicks

    We have week old Avocet chicks in the Saltholme Scrape in front of Saltholme Hide. Come and see them before they grow up !
  • Blog Post: Juicy insects

    Good weather in June means juicy new insects about. Black-tailed Skimmers have emerged from the Main Lake and are sunning themselves on the paths. When Dragonflies first emerge, they are pale and weak and need about 3 weeks of nice weather and munchy food to mature. In this state they are called ‘teneral’...
  • Blog Post: A career in conservation? Why not!

    Since last July I’ve been a voluntary Warden Intern at RSPB Otmoor. The position was advertised as a way to get all the training I’d need to be a nature reserve warden. It’s certainly delivered on that but there’s so much more that’s come with it. I’ve been trained...
  • Blog Post: Poster: Recent Sightings - WE 18th June, 2016.

  • Blog Post: Peanut etiquette

    You can tell what is feeding in the Wildlife Watchpoint Mouse House by looking at the mess left behind. Wood Mice shell the peanuts, leaving the shell intact on the floor, and then run off with the nice white nut. Bank Voles simply rip the shells off in the bowls and leave lots of bits in the bowl. Common...