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  • Blog Post: Couldn't have gone any better!

    At the start of yesterdays ‘Discover Radipole Lake’ walk, I perhaps rather foolishly asked everyone if there was something in particular anyone really wanted to see. Names such as Bearded Tit, Bittern, Kingfisher were all mentioned and I thought to myself, "Oh no... have I accidentally...
  • Blog Post: The Big Push

    Strolling along, minding my own business... I spotted something familiar among the Fleabane and grasses beside the Radipole hide trail last week. It was (and still is) a Wasp Spider (Argiope bruennichi), an unmistakeable species with an abdomen banded with vivid black and yellow stripes, which inspired...
  • Blog Post: School Children decorate nature‚Äôs home

    School children from Weymouth and Dorchester have been working hard over the past months to give local RSPB Radipole Lake reserve an artistic facelift. If you head down to Radipole Lake today, you may be in for a pleasant surprise. The RSPB has been working with nine local schools this year to decorate...
  • Blog Post: A Day of Firsts...

    Today was a day of honest, energy-sapping endeavour spent 'putting the Buddleia verges to bed' with brush cutters and elbow greace; but as so often Radipole offered up her finest as more than ample reward. Damon, (our erstwhile Estate Worker then Arne's Estate worker, now Dorset's Estate...
  • Blog Post: Moovers and shakers.

    We have recently received a couple of enquiries about the why's and wherefores of cattle on the reserves as it can appear incongruous to have hulking great bovines trampling and munching their way through our precious reserves. The cows on Radipole and Lodmoor through spring, summer and autumn...
  • Blog Post: The spider who came in from the cold.

    Let us introduce you to Lassie. She lives in our bathroom, just inside the slightly ajar top window to be precise, from where she has a commanding view of all who come and go as their ablutions and bodily functions require. We’re most likely to notice her at night when she emerges from her favourite...
  • Blog Post: Your tern to Step Up for Nature

    Chesil Beach hosts the only breeding colony of the Little Tern in the south-west. This beautiful bird is indeed little - about half the size of a common tern - and considerably less common. They migrate to Britain annualy after wintering off the western coast of Africa. The last two years have seen the...
  • Blog Post: Another coat of gloss.

    The understandable excitement generated by our showy Glossy Ibis of yesterday saw a steady stream of expectant birders making their way up to North Hide in hope of more catwalk antics today. Although the green sheened one did put in an appearance this morning, it was - unlike yesterday - at a distance...
  • Blog Post: Designated management pays dividends.

    Mention has been made on these pages of the efforts made in recent times to improve the reserves value to amphibians and reptiles. Back in the spring a number of the recently dug ‘amphibian pools’ had frog spawn in them for the first time. Although some late frosts didn't help the frogs...
  • Blog Post: Eight crested grebes.

    A certain sign that spring is in the offing is the return of great crested grebes to the lake, having spent the deepest winter as coast dwellers. A quick stroll around Buddleia in this evening's dying light revealed no fewer than eight individuals - each bedecked in their striking summer finery....
  • Blog Post: Who's the Daddy?

    Late last year I wrote in this blog about a spider ( Steotoda nobilis ) which was living in our bathroom and which we came to call Lassie. Concerned about Lassie’s apparently self-destructive diet regime we gave her a square meal and observed her return to prime condition. As winter progressed...
  • Blog Post: Tales from the Riverbank - poor Ratty.

    Last Friday I dusted down the video equipment which we'd been using to record the recent footage of otters. In fading light just before close of play, satisfied that the kit was ready for action after the festive season shut-down, Nick and I re-installed it on one of the channels in the middle of...
  • Blog Post: Phenology - The Recording of Natural Events

    In my flower blog last week I mentioned that the flowering blackthorn was recorded on the phenology website. Phenology is the study and recording the timing of natural events such as budburst, first flowering, fruiting, autumn leaf fall, hibernation, migration of birds, first songs, nesting, first butterflies...
  • Blog Post: Two Owls!!

    Owls are undoubtedly one of the more charismatic bird groups, (what with their night vision and ability to hear a pin drop at 40 silent wing beats) and I was lucky enough to see two species yesterday at either end of the county. In the morning we witnessed a magnificent short-eared owl on Arne...
  • Blog Post: Fond Memories of Nick Quintrell

    It's now been six weeks since the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Nick Quintrell. We are still coming to terms with his sudden loss and his absence is still very much felt down here on the Weymouth Wetlands. The Weymouth blogging team have also lost our finest blogger. Nick's brilliant...
  • Blog Post: Roe deer, roe deer.

    Roe deer are a fairly common sight on Radipole and Luke was fortunate enough to capture these images on of this beautiful doe on Radipole last week. Of the six deer species found in the British Isles, only roe and the mightily antlered red are native. Fallow, muntjac, Chinese water deer and sika have...
  • Blog Post: Small wonder

    This misty morning, after surveying the copious evidence of someone’s haze-inducing, lager session at the viewing shelter, I was walking back to along on Buddleia Trail to fetch a rubbish bag when I spotted a movement way ahead on the path. The brown critter scurrying across into the border at...
  • Blog Post: Festive Reedbed Management - with our Rethink Reinforcements.

    The RSPB in Weymouth have been working closely with the mental health charity Rethink for over seven years now and the relationship is as strong as ever - as are the benifits to all parties. Recent visitors to Radipole will have seen what is gradually becoming a substancial area of cut reed snaking up...
  • Blog Post: They're behind you...!

    As you may know we have been attempting over recent months to film otters at Radipole. In practise this has meant identifying sites that they frequent (as indicated by recent footprints and a liberal scattering of fragrant otter poo nearby) and then installing a camera trap in the hope that our quarry...
  • Blog Post: A Caspian Beauty and Glorious Mud.

    After reed flowers (when the seed heads turn purple) we are able to begin lowering Radipole's water levels by gradually removing sluice boards at Westham Bridge – thus explaining the recent unveiling of mudflats outside the Visitor Centre. Through spring and summer we raise water which helps...
  • Blog Post: Tracking Ratty and life in the undergrowth.

    Last week we began a project to evaluate the value of our recently restored ditches to water voles. Running the project and analysing the data is Alex Hannam, a volunteer who commences a Environmental Science degree in Aberystwyth this autumn. The methodology is thus: 50 metre transects are marked...
  • Blog Post: What big eyes you have...

    Possibly the greatest allure of wildlife watching is the tangible sense of anticipation for what may lie around every corner - of possible new species to encounter or new behaviours to witness from more familiar characters. The scene below was photographed by regular (almost resident) visitor Dan Dench...
  • Media: Marsh Harrier

    This was taken at north hide on Tuesday 1st November
  • Media: Bearded Tit Acrobat

    Male juvenile bearded tit. RSPB Radipole, Weymouth, UK. 15/07/11.
  • Media: Kingfisher Couple

    Kingfisher pair at RSPB Radipole. Dorset, UK. When not busy excavating their new home they were content to sun themselves. 24/03/11.