CATS!!!

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CATS!!!

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Absolutely sick of them! Even though my wire fox terrier does a good job of seeing them off there are still 2 who creep in when he's not looking and they are taking my birds. They've also made off with four of my new fish and quite a few of my frogs, even though there is a net over the pond. It's heartbreaking and as much as I love animals/wildlife/birds etc I am ready to get a gun and shoot the things. My son, who's a university student, also gets pretty wound up about it and he says "mum, you just know that when that cat goes back to its home the owner will be saying 'oh look at darling Tiddles, he's brought his mummy a little birdie', but we've seen the other side of that!" If anyone has any ideas other than a gun I would be grateful because hearing those birds screaming as they're caught is very upsetting for us all.

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  • If there a unknown cat in our garden I make them unwanted.

    I make some loud pitch cat meowing noises like cats do when they feel threatened by another cat as in cat fight.

    It seems to keep them out from our garden.

    I chase them off, hose them down, show no affection towards them at all, and they soon get the hint they are not wanted in our patch.

    This has worked in our last two properties so far so hopefully it will work where we go next - and yes I will keep an eye on the pond too (we are thinking of buying fish for the pond)

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

  • They are pests!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Twitter

    They are pests!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Well that is really weird twitter as cats killing things is only nature as you said in defence of Magpies

  • Hi everyone! - might as well put my spoke in as well. There are now an estimated 10 million plus cats in the UK. They are thought to kill around 55 million birds a year amongst other wildlife. There is nothing natural about having such a high density of top predators concentrated in suburban/ urban areas. People bang on about birds of prey and corvids whilst dear pussykins commits murder just for the fun of it. They are bad news.

     

     

     

  • Just a bit of fun - if all else fails

  • cjbeady

    Hi everyone! - might as well put my spoke in as well. There are now an estimated 10 million plus cats in the UK. They are thought to kill around 55 million birds a year amongst other wildlife. There is nothing natural about having such a high density of top predators concentrated in suburban/ urban areas. People bang on about birds of prey and corvids whilst dear pussykins commits murder just for the fun of it. They are bad news.

     Yes that is a good spoke C J  added together with disturbances by dogs,kills by squirrels,corvids,foxes badgers and raptors all of which are much higher numbers than say 50 years ago it is a wonder we have any small birds and just in case anyone thinks i hate corvids to protect what they may think is pheasants or such like,no simply the number of small birds they kill.If anyone added up how many corvids are in this country and multiplied it by how many young birds each one takes the answer must be a colossal number.This is particularly relevant in outlying areas such as farmhouses and workers cottages where all of these are much more prevalent than in towns and villages so perhaps unfortunately most people do not see the amount of damage done,strangely especially the RSPB.Have not met one person who spends majority of time in the countryside working who thinks corvids do not affect small bird populations.Of course it is unlikely the RSPB will say much against cats and dogs as it is likely to hit subs. 

     

     

  • Richard Brown

    The thing is with cats is that that they completely screw up the food chain as, in normal/natural circumstances, there would not be anywhere near the concentration of predators in a given built up area were it not for dometic (and i use the term loosely) cats.  I find small anti personnel land mines are the best bet - they make a bit of a mess though.

    I have to say that I find that post (along with some others on this thread) pretty offensive,  Our cat is confined to quarters during non daylight hours both for her safety and for that of wildlife. I don't have a problem with neighbours discouraging her with sonic devices, application of water, loud bellows, or physical barriers (though she hardly set foot outside our own curtilage anyway). If anyone attempted to harm her, however, and I found out about it I would personally visit hell upon them.  OK?  

  • John B (not the sloop)

    Richard Brown

    The thing is with cats is that that they completely screw up the food chain as, in normal/natural circumstances, there would not be anywhere near the concentration of predators in a given built up area were it not for dometic (and i use the term loosely) cats.  I find small anti personnel land mines are the best bet - they make a bit of a mess though.

    I have to say that I find that post (along with some others on this thread) pretty offensive,  Our cat is confined to quarters during non daylight hours both for her safety and for that of wildlife. I don't have a problem with neighbours discouraging her with sonic devices, application of water, loud bellows, or physical barriers (though she hardly set foot outside our own curtilage anyway). If anyone attempted to harm her, however, and I found out about it I would personally visit hell upon them.  OK?  

     

    There's nothing like a good sense of humour.  My point about the food chain is 100% accurate. You may keep your cat under wraps and good for you, its the others who dont that are the problem.  And please lighten up - the bit about landmines was a joke, anyway, i've found hand grenades to be far more flexible...........

  • I feel the issue with cats is that although most cat owners are deeply responsible for their pet and of course caring, the problem is those cat owners who think it is perfectly natural for a variety of an introduced species to act as if it is a native or even naturalised predator.  Let's face facts the feeding of birds or other garden wildlife is a supplement to their natural diet, I can buy seeds, fats etc. but it is the insects, grubs etc, that feed the chicks, and I rely on nature for providing them, as do parent birds.  A cat on the other hand is a domestic pet.  This means that the owner is  completely responsible for that animal, and the cat should not be forced to fend for itself.  An issue with cats in comparison to the other great domestic pet the dog, is that cats appear to be much closer to their wild ancestry when compared with canines.  For many cat owners the appeal of the cat is that he or she has a degree of independance and is more of a free thinker than a dog.  In all honesty cats require as much love and attention as the family dog.  I don't own any domestic animals myself (I might not be able to give a pet all the devotion and care it requires) but I can't imagine the horror that is bestowed upon a cat owner, when a still barely alive bird or small mamal is presented as a wee gift.

    Often people compare attacks by cats to predation by raptors or corvids.  This is, I believe, a mistake.  A Sparrowhawk predating a Starling might look scarey but there is a fundimental reason for this.  Survival of the Sparrowhawks and that of their chicks.  A cat on the other hand doesn't need to eat a bird or any other wild creature to survive.  Also the fact that domestic cats have in many cases lost most of their ability to kill as their wild ancestors did and the wild cats can, most pet cats would cut sorry figures trying to fend for themselves in the wild world.  Yes some may survive for a bit but I'm certain they wouldn't do too well.  In fact a quick look at the Cats Protection website (while writing this) tells how much love and attention these lovely pets need.  There are of course humane detterants which can scare off cats.  I personally find my presence and a few loud words to the cat about how it should: "Away and get yer owner tae open a tin!" is most effective.  I'd be lying if I was to say I dislike cats though but it's a territorial thing, and I'm sure the small number of cats who somtimes come into the garden would understand.  The thing is though I despise all forms of cruelty to animals whether fauna or avifauna, wild or domestic.  Cats may only affect a tiny percent of the wildlife but it is a tiny percent that should not be affected by a domestic pet.  A hose reel or water pistol is far cheaper than any more violent methods of detterent and you won't have weapons inspectors pay you a visit.  Cats are generally pretty cool, I just wish all of their owners were similar and the cat owners who aren't responsible should look at the fine example set by good cat owners.

    Paul.

  • Richard Brown

    John B (not the sloop)

    Richard Brown

    The thing is with cats is that that they completely screw up the food chain as, in normal/natural circumstances, there would not be anywhere near the concentration of predators in a given built up area were it not for dometic (and i use the term loosely) cats.  I find small anti personnel land mines are the best bet - they make a bit of a mess though.

    I have to say that I find that post (along with some others on this thread) pretty offensive,  Our cat is confined to quarters during non daylight hours both for her safety and for that of wildlife. I don't have a problem with neighbours discouraging her with sonic devices, application of water, loud bellows, or physical barriers (though she hardly set foot outside our own curtilage anyway). If anyone attempted to harm her, however, and I found out about it I would personally visit hell upon them.  OK?  

     

    There's nothing like a good sense of humour.  My point about the food chain is 100% accurate. You may keep your cat under wraps and good for you, its the others who dont that are the problem.  And please lighten up - the bit about landmines was a joke, anyway, i've found hand grenades to be far more flexible...........

    You're right - there's nothing like a good sense of humour.  And a bit of banter about inflicting pain and suffering  on animals, whether much loved family pets or not, strikes me as nothing like a good sense of humour. Otherwise, mine is pretty well developed thanks.   If the notion of a grenade attack on a small animal strikes you as funny than I pity you, and if that viewpoint is common throughout membership of this otherwise excellent forum, then I don't feel that I can stick around any longer.

  • Hi John

    Want you to come back here on the RSPB please.

    I have to say that each and every time the issue of cats is raised about cats in relation to birds - it tends to be very contraversal, and people do get very emotive about the subject

    That is why I tend to avoid posting about Cat issues (as a rule of thumb)

    Wonder woody: I hope that we all find our own ways of dealing with cats with a kind heart attached. 

    As the moderators have pointed out, there are so many items on the market to deter them it is worth investigating.

    Regards

    Kathy and Dave

  • THERE IS NOTHING , whatever the RSPB  say,on the market which deter these horrible pests.  RSPB sell them, of course they're going to say they work, people who have them and say they work are not watching their gardens 24/7. In just the past 8 days have seen starlings, bluetits, goldfinch  and greenfinch killed and left  - not eaten as prey,, A total of 27 birds   in ONE small street.  This by cats of two responsible cat owners. Responsible, because their cats have a bell on their collars.!!!!    If a dog went out raping, pilaging and murdering and messing in gardens like these animals do,  - because its their nature!!!!!! - there would be an outcry and  fines and charges and  all sorts being sought.

    Yes its an immotive subject and some people become angry and some become defensve and upset so  WHY do the RSPB moderators  not stop these subjects as soon as they are  published.   mmmm -

    freedom of speech and/or freedom to advocate and sell cat deterents ?????

    I doubt if this will be posted , most  of my posts on cats are blocked because they upset,  Well do you know what, I'll bet its not nearly half as  upset   as  I get picking up yet anotherdead  bird, killed, JUST FOR THE SAKE OF IT,...

  • Hi Soosin

    Just wanted to say that I wholeheartedly agree with what you have just said. It is time this conspiracy of silence regarding cats was broken. Even on Springwatch Chris Packham is not allowed to mention his views on them in case the BBC get complaints from viewers. Every time I have to deal with yet another mauled dead/dying bird my heart just breaks. OK- Corvids and B of P kill birds - but it is for survival. Cats kill for sport and then go home and stuff themselves with Go-Cat.

    CJ

    Soosin

    THERE IS NOTHING , whatever the RSPB  say,on the market which deter these horrible pests.  RSPB sell them, of course they're going to say they work, people who have them and say they work are not watching their gardens 24/7. In just the past 8 days have seen starlings, bluetits, goldfinch  and greenfinch killed and left  - not eaten as prey,, A total of 27 birds   in ONE small street.  This by cats of two responsible cat owners. Responsible, because their cats have a bell on their collars.!!!!    If a dog went out raping, pilaging and murdering and messing in gardens like these animals do,  - because its their nature!!!!!! - there would be an outcry and  fines and charges and  all sorts being sought.

    Yes its an immotive subject and some people become angry and some become defensve and upset so  WHY do the RSPB moderators  not stop these subjects as soon as they are  published.   mmmm -

    freedom of speech and/or freedom to advocate and sell cat deterents ?????

    I doubt if this will be posted , most  of my posts on cats are blocked because they upset,  Well do you know what, I'll bet its not nearly half as  upset   as  I get picking up yet anotherdead  bird, killed, JUST FOR THE SAKE OF IT,...

     

  • As has previously been mentioned, the UK's estimated 7.2 million cats are known to take millions (up to 55 million!) of birds each year, but from a conservation viewpoint, we need to consider whether this is causing bird populations to decline. The domestic cat takes 15 times more birds than owls and sparrowhawks.

     

    The most frequently caught birds, according to the Mammal Society, are (in order) house sparrows, blue tits, blackbirds and starlings. Despite this, there is no scientific evidence that predation by cats in gardens is having any impact on bird populations UK-wide. This sounds surprising, but many millions of birds die naturally every year, mainly through starvation, disease, or other forms of predation.

     

    Unfortunately for the birds, domestic cats are protected by law and it is an offence to trap, injure or kill them. Cats, even if unwelcome in your garden, may be someone's much-loved pets. Some people have called for legislation to be introduced to curb the freedom with which cats are allowed to roam. While we understand this, we are not able to urge the government to introduce such legislation as we have no scientific proof of the impact of cat predation on bird populations that is strong enough to support such a call.

     

    The Catwatch deterrent is the only device the RSPB has tested and recommends, and they have been shown to be effective in many cases but of course, not all - there are many similar devices available, and you are free to purchase from any source. Besides this device, the RSPB offers many other ideas to help that are either cheap, free or from other suppliers – please read my earlier post! It’s not easy, but with a little thought, and patience and a combination of ideas you can reduce the effect cats have on your local population.

     

    Please try to remember that no deterrent can 100% guarantee protection from cats or other predators!

     

    If you feel this strongly about cats I suggest you vent your frustrations by contacting your MP and asking him/her to raise the issue in Parliament, and encouraging your friends, family or any like-minded people to do the same – that is the only way to get laws changed in the UK.