CATS!!!

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CATS!!!

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Absolutely sick of them! Even though my wire fox terrier does a good job of seeing them off there are still 2 who creep in when he's not looking and they are taking my birds. They've also made off with four of my new fish and quite a few of my frogs, even though there is a net over the pond. It's heartbreaking and as much as I love animals/wildlife/birds etc I am ready to get a gun and shoot the things. My son, who's a university student, also gets pretty wound up about it and he says "mum, you just know that when that cat goes back to its home the owner will be saying 'oh look at darling Tiddles, he's brought his mummy a little birdie', but we've seen the other side of that!" If anyone has any ideas other than a gun I would be grateful because hearing those birds screaming as they're caught is very upsetting for us all.

Verified Answer
  • Do the cats who come in your garden have collars with bells one them? Also, you could move your bird tables away from bushes and trees - cats can hide under bushes to stalk the birds.

    I am a cat owner myself and I can assure you if our cat brings in any birds (he has bought in about three in the past three years) we certainly don't praise him for it. He gets a massive telling off - i'm trying to condition him not to bring them in.

    It's very saddening as we don't like him killing birds as much as you do. We have managed to save one bird before that he bought in that was still alive and unharmed once it had gotten over the shock.

    If you know who the owners of the cats are, you could always tell them about it and see if they can help at all?

  • We had a problem with cats inour garden, 3 of them. Whilst we hated them for chasing and in a couple of instances catching the birds, we also hated discovering their covered up poo in our flower beds when hoeing or weeding.  We finally resorted to one of those electronic devices and found it very successful. I actually watched a cat creeping around a bush one morning when he suddenly shot off out towards the gate. I assumed he had been assailed by the electronic beep. So different to last year when I was nearly tearing my hair out and hating every cat on sight. I was even thinking up the most ghastly ways of doing away with any I got hold off lol. That used to make me feel better lol.  So I recommend the electronic device.  Good luck

  • There are a number of sonic devices available. These emit a high-pitched sound that only cats can hear each time they trip a sensor. However, there is only one sonic product that the RSPB recommends and that is Catwatch - http://shopping.rspb.org.uk/p//R0123.htm

     

    There is an automated option, the scarecrow, which is attached to a hosepipe, and will deliver a water jet when activated by a motion detector - (http://www.deteracat.co.uk/scarecrow_water_jet_pack.htm)

     

     

    Other cat deterrents include:

     

    ·      Surround the area with a fence (chicken wire etc) that leans in the direction from which the cat will approach. The cat is unable to climb over such an angled fence and should prevent access to the nest,

    ·     Taut wire or string fitted 10-15 cm above the fence-top makes it difficult for cats to balance on the fence,

    ·      Specially designed strips of plastic spikes on top of a fence, shed roof, nestbox roof etc to prevent cat from walking on it - I would think these to be very effective in your situation if they are positioned correctly, (http://www.livesafe.co.uk/Prikka-Strip_webpage.htm)

    ·     Place ½ full plastic bottles in borders. This is an old gamekeepers trick – light reflection is supposed to deter, but as mentioned in an earlier thread, they need to be moved periodically to remain effective,

    ·      Unwanted CDs can be threaded on twine with knots in between to keep them apart. String these across flowerbeds or hang from trees. Again, the light reflections deter,

    ·     Spiked tree collar to prevent climbing up a tree – available from Jacobi Jayne, http://www.jacobijayne.co.uk/ or tel: 0800 072 0130.

    ·     Vaseline or other grease on or around any possible entrances that may give access to the nests,

    ·      Placing clippings from thorny or spiky plants under bird feeders and under bushes will prevent cats from using these areas to stalk birds,

    ·     As previously mentioned, there is a garden plant, Coleus canina, on the market. It is marketed under names ‘Pee-off’ and ‘Scaredy cat’. This plant has a pungent odour that is said to repel cats and other mammals from the garden. It should be available from a number of garden suppliers,

    ·     Scent deterrents will either serve to repel or mark a territory (Silent Roar), Alternatively, try orange or lemon peel, since cats are not keen on the smell of citrus - Vinegar, chilli powder or paste around areas where the cat walks through or likes to sit can also be very effective. 

     

  • The thing is with cats is that that they completely screw up the food chain as, in normal/natural circumstances, there would not be anywhere near the concentration of predators in a given built up area were it not for dometic (and i use the term loosely) cats.  I find small anti personnel land mines are the best bet - they make a bit of a mess though.

  • Yes I hate them too Wonderwoody. Last Spring in my garden was total carnage, however, after some serious garden reorganisation I think I have cracked it. I moved planters around to block vulnerable areas and I also  bought something called PRIKKA -STRIP from my local hardware store which I fixed on the top of the fence panels where they came in my garden. This has done the trick as they clearly do not like the feel of spikey plastic under their dainty little feet! I haven't had a cat in my garden now for a month - although they are still around as I've seen them in my neighbours garden. Constant vigilance is required though -as who knows when the 'enemy' will reappear!

  • I too am sick and tired of cats stalking and killing birds in our garden.  We have invested in 3 of the Catwatch deterrents which I like to think are helping.  We live on a military base though so our neighbours are quite transient which means we constantly seem to have new cats living in the area which need "educating".

    My latest idea has been to dot hanging baskets frames around the borders where the cats like to hide before they pounce.  Putting the metal frame upside down makes an obstacle for the cat, it doesn't detract too much from your garden as you don't really notice the green frame but still allows you to spot the wretched things if they are lurking!

    We also keep a plastic bottle half filled with water handy by the door to throw at any visitors - it won't hurt them if they are hit (I am a member of the RSPCA!)  but certainly puts them off visiting again. 

    What is really making me cross though is a new neighbour who has put out loads of bird feeders and has a very predatory cat - it lies under the feeder just waiting for its next victim - some people are just so stupid and completely selfish! 

  • I live in a bungalow in a row of three, which is situated at the end.  in front of the bungalow is a communal area which we look after.  There is a pyracanthea hedge which the black birds love to nest in.  The next door neighbours have three cats.  This week the cats have caught three blackbirds all babies.  My husband has now fenced off the bottom of the hedge as the cats were crawling under the hedge to get to the birds.  My husband spoke to the neighbour about her cats kiling the birds and her reply was that she did not like the cats bringing the birds into the house, but there was no offer of stopping them doing it or even helping towards the cost.

    In our back garden which is fairly new I have planted bushes etc that will attract wildlife but there is no sign of any birds.  I have a electronic cat scarer also.  Is there anything else I can do to attract the birds in the back garden.  The cats do not venture into the back garden.

All Replies
  • You could always buy a python.  ;-)

  • i use a "cat-apult"

  • You could try a cat scarer device that uses high frequncy sound. Sort of thing they have at garden centres

  • I was in the rounders team in school so am already pretty good with hurling rocks and stones!!

  • There is stuff advertised, which is LION's POO!  Apparently, it does not smell to us humans,but if you put a bit of it around the garden, it keeps cats away. Have a look in some of the brochures which fall thru your letterbox, full of ideas for  gadgets & household solutions etc.

  • Also, my father used to use a water pistol (you can get quite high powered ones now in toyshops) as cats don't like getting wet, or being surprised.

  • Not sure that any more aggressive action towards cats or any other animal for that matter is compatable with the ethos of an RSPB forum The suggestion of a python is somewhat bizarre in view of the incident where a cat was eaten by thirteen foot python in a neighbours garden. The python is not listed as a dangerous animal under the relevant act as it is not venomous. I can only assume that being crushed to death is somehow less harmful than being poisoned. It may be of interest that there is a petition on the Downing Street website to get such creatures as constricting reptiles including in the dangerous category. The cat was proven to be in the snake belly when the lump was scanned revealing the microchip with the owners data. Whether your suggestion was serious or not you may wish to consider your position had the victim been a baby, small child or even your grandma! Of course in these circumstances there would have been no microchip to detect! As for the suggestion of a cat apult again if these suggestions are facetuos they are not appropriate as they are not if seriously intended. If your intent is to harm one particular species, one might  assume your double standards of animal welfare could well extend elsewhere! Descrimination in any shape or form is not an endearing trait!

  • Do the cats who come in your garden have collars with bells one them? Also, you could move your bird tables away from bushes and trees - cats can hide under bushes to stalk the birds.

    I am a cat owner myself and I can assure you if our cat brings in any birds (he has bought in about three in the past three years) we certainly don't praise him for it. He gets a massive telling off - i'm trying to condition him not to bring them in.

    It's very saddening as we don't like him killing birds as much as you do. We have managed to save one bird before that he bought in that was still alive and unharmed once it had gotten over the shock.

    If you know who the owners of the cats are, you could always tell them about it and see if they can help at all?

  • It's called having a sense of humour and in the face of diversity!  I can assure you I have NO intention of harming the cats nor do I have double standards with regard to animal welfare, having been a member of the RSPB, WWF, Gwent Wildlife Trust and a regular supporter of IFAW and WSPA for many years. I support the NSPCC as well as my standards extend to child welfare.

    I am taking up the suggestion of the electronic device.

  • they dont work with the cats that invade my garden they are a dam pain taking birds and messing in my borders.

  • Joanne Treverton

    Do the cats who come in your garden have collars with bells one them? Also, you could move your bird tables away from bushes and trees - cats can hide under bushes to stalk the birds.

    I am a cat owner myself and I can assure you if our cat brings in any birds (he has bought in about three in the past three years) we certainly don't praise him for it. He gets a massive telling off - i'm trying to condition him not to bring them in.

    It's very saddening as we don't like him killing birds as much as you do. We have managed to save one bird before that he bought in that was still alive and unharmed once it had gotten over the shock.

    If you know who the owners of the cats are, you could always tell them about it and see if they can help at all?

    The bird feeder is in the middle of the lawn but near enough to the hedge for the birds to fly to should the local sparrowhawk be in the vicinity. Sadly these guys don't have bells on their collars but I will try to seek out the owners. thanks for your suggestions.

  • Hi, the most effective way I know of is to use a hose on the cats. This is not cruel or painful and it tends to deter them well. I am a cat owner, always have been, and I am very lucky that the cat I have now does not like to catch birds or other wildlife. He reminds me of James the Cat from the old cartoon. He actually sits on the decking stairs watching the birds feeding on their station. The birds in my garden are also not scared of him in return which is good.

    I am sorry you have this problem- I remember hearing the frogs scream when my previous cats had caught one- I rescued them everytime! But the hose is a very good shout- my next door neighbour doesn't like my cat in his garden so he get's him with the hose and now he's too scared (or just not liking the water) to go in there at all!

    Hope you find a solution :)

  • Woodard

    Absolutely sick of them! Even though my wire fox terrier does a good job of seeing them off there are still 2 who creep in when he's not looking and they are taking my birds. They've also made off with four of my new fish and quite a few of my frogs, even though there is a net over the pond. It's heartbreaking and as much as I love animals/wildlife/birds etc I am ready to get a gun and shoot the things. My son, who's a university student, also gets pretty wound up about it and he says "mum, you just know that when that cat goes back to its home the owner will be saying 'oh look at darling Tiddles, he's brought his mummy a little birdie', but we've seen the other side of that!" If anyone has any ideas other than a gun I would be grateful because hearing those birds screaming as they're caught is very upsetting for us all.

    Woodard

    Absolutely sick of them! Even though my wire fox terrier does a good job of seeing them off there are still 2 who creep in when he's not looking and they are taking my birds. They've also made off with four of my new fish and quite a few of my frogs, even though there is a net over the pond. It's heartbreaking and as much as I love animals/wildlife/birds etc I am ready to get a gun and shoot the things. My son, who's a university student, also gets pretty wound up about it and he says "mum, you just know that when that cat goes back to its home the owner will be saying 'oh look at darling Tiddles, he's brought his mummy a little birdie', but we've seen the other side of that!" If anyone has any ideas other than a gun I would be grateful because hearing those birds screaming as they're caught is very upsetting for us all.

    And my wife and I thought we were the only ones with a problem with cats!  What a relief!  Five years ago we moved to a house in Tewkesbury.  Here the soil is solid clay, so gardening can be difficult.  We built raised flower beds and imported soft soil.  What a mistake!  Every moggy in the neighbourhood started to visit us daily.  Sometimes it was like the queue for the ladies loo on a Bank Holiday at the seaside.  Not only was there the filth of cat poo everywhere, but we had to bury four dead blue-tit chicks after one parent was found dead on the lawn with the feathers of the other one nearby.

    We have tried most things suggested: sprays, gels, electronic devices, the hose pipe, chasing them out, stone throwing, I now have a catapult (but have yet to use it).  Nothing seems to work for very long.  So we would like to sound out public opinion: can we make cat owners subject to the same laws as dog owners?

    That is:  cats must be licenced; owners must take their cat for a walk on a lead;  owners are responsible for picking up the cat poo;  and lastly, cat flaps should be banned.  This would put the responsibility for cats where it belongs:  with the owners.  Is it asking too much?

    Regards  Seajay

  • What about the ground protector cages?

    https://shopping.rspb.org.uk/p/BirdAccessories/Ground_protectors.htm

  • We had a problem with cats inour garden, 3 of them. Whilst we hated them for chasing and in a couple of instances catching the birds, we also hated discovering their covered up poo in our flower beds when hoeing or weeding.  We finally resorted to one of those electronic devices and found it very successful. I actually watched a cat creeping around a bush one morning when he suddenly shot off out towards the gate. I assumed he had been assailed by the electronic beep. So different to last year when I was nearly tearing my hair out and hating every cat on sight. I was even thinking up the most ghastly ways of doing away with any I got hold off lol. That used to make me feel better lol.  So I recommend the electronic device.  Good luck