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This month

What to see, do and plant in your garden this month

September

This is the month when summer suddenly seems to give way to autumn. Colours in the garden become more muted as seeds and fruit ripen, and leaves take on the first hints of red and brown. More...

September

Species of the month

Water vole

Water voles are the UK's biggest vole species. They're small, brown, furry and really quite cute, with a round face a bit like a guinea pig's. Their tail is furry, not bald like a rat's. ... More...

Water vole

Animals

Birds are not the only creatures to benefit from a wildlife garden. Learn more about the wide variety of animals that use your garden, including when you're likely to see them, and where.

Badger

Badgers are stocky, with short legs and silvery-grey fur. They have very distinctive black and white markings on their faces. More...

Badger

Hedgehog

Hedgehogs have a rather rounded body covered in short, dark, yellow-tipped spines, and a short tail. They come out at night and can be heard snuffling and grunting as they forage for food. More...

Hedgehog

Ladybird

Named after the Virgin Mary, this brightly-coloured beetle is well known as the 'gardeners' friend', as it feasts on aphids. More...

Ladybird

Rabbit

Rabbits are not native to Britain; the Normans brought them here in the 12th century for their, then much-prized, fur and meat. Today, they are among our commonest and most widespread mammals. More...

Rabbit

Need other garden advice?

Visit our advice section for further information on how to improve your garden for birds and wildlife.

Planting and maintaining a hedge

A hedge needs to be managed to ensure it maintains its function as a shelter and refuge for wildlife and doesn't grow out of control and cause issues with neighbours, or reduces access. More...

Planting and maintaining a hedge

Peat-free gardening

The large-scale removal of peat from bogs in Britain and Ireland is destroying one of our most precious wildlife habitats. It takes centuries for a peat bog to form, with its special wildlife - modern machinery destroys it in days. More...

Peat-free gardening

Planning and creating a wildlife-friendly garden

Whether you want to create a new garden, or have an existing one, patio or balcony, try to imagine your garden is a nature reserve and you are the warden. More...

Planning and creating a wildlife-friendly garden

Unwanted garden visitors

We're frequently asked about ways to keep certain animals away from the garden. As a conservation organisation, we are not generally involved in deterring and scaring birds or other animals. However, we appreciate that in some circumstances people can have problems, and to help, we have accumulated information on various deterrents that people tell us they have tried with at least some success. More...

Unwanted garden visitors

Give nature a home

Carder bumblebee harvesting nectar

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Ways to attract wildlife

You can plant all kinds of shrubs and flowers that will benefit wildlife throughout the year.

Bramble

A real must in any wildlife garden, blackberry flowers provide nectar and pollen for many insects, it bears fruit in late summer and autumn, and offers good cover all year round. More...

Bramble

Hawthorn

A very valuable addition to any wildlife garden, hawthorn provides food for more than 150 different insect species. More...

Hawthorn

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle is a vigorous climber that if pruned hard thickens up to become an ideal nest and roost site. More...

Honeysuckle

Ivy

Ivy is a woody, evergreen climber that grows up walls, fences and trees using tiny roots to cling to the substrate; in woods it can also carpet the ground. More...

Ivy

Garden habitats

From window boxes to log piles and meadow areas, all habitats are important for wildlife. Whether you want to make the most of what you already have, or want to create more habitats, we've got the information for you.

Bog garden

It is well worth considering creating a boggy area as a feature in your wildlife garden - any permanently damp area will suffice. More...

Bog garden

Eaves

The eaves of a house may sound an unlikely place to look for wildlife, but you'd be suprised by the species making use of this sheltered, and often warm, space. More...

Eaves

Log pile

Plenty of wildlife makes its home in dead wood, and other animals use it as a source of food. In woodlands, fallen wood occurs naturally and many species have adapted to use this habitat. But in our increasingly tidy countryside, fallen and dead wood is not so common. More...

Log pile

Pond

A well-designed and maintained pond is a haven for all sorts of plants, birds and animals. It is a complex habitat full of algae and plants, scavengers, predators, herbivores, decomposers and parasites. More...

Pond