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Habitats

Bat box

Hanging a bat box in a suitable position can help local populations. They are easy to make and widely available to buy. More...

Bat box

Birdbath

Birds need water in all seasons. Birdbaths should be sited carefully; birds need clear visibility, nearby bushes for cover and perches on which to sit and preen. More...

Birdbath

Birdtable

Birdtables can be free-standing, hanging or fixed to a wall or fence, and are an excellent way to feed garden birds. More...

Birdtable

Bog garden

It is well worth considering creating a boggy area as a feature in your wildlife garden - any permanently damp area will suffice. More...

Bog garden

Bug box

Bug boxes provide snug, safe places for insects to hibernate - being especially good for lacewings and ladybirds. More...

Bug box

Compost heap

A compost heap is important in any garden. You can use it to recycle all your kitchen and garden waste into rich, organic compost that's great for the soil and plants. More...

Compost heap

Eaves

The eaves of a house may sound an unlikely place to look for wildlife, but you'd be suprised by the species making use of this sheltered, and often warm, space. More...

Eaves

Fence/wall

Havens for wildlife, fences and walls can support a host of animals and small flowering plants. More...

Fence/wall

Flower border/herb garden

Flower borders and herb gardens can be extremely valuable for wildlife. Native wild flower species attract the most wildlife. More...

Flower border/herb garden

Hanging basket

You can create hanging baskets full of gorgeous summer annuals and have other baskets that last throughout the year. They are surprisingly good for wildlife too! More...

Hanging basket

Hedge

A native hedgerow is great for wildlife and contains hundreds of species, including those also found in woodland and meadows. More...

Hedge

Lawn

Welcome some weeds in your lawn. A scruffy-looking lawn, with plenty of weeds, can support many species. More...

Lawn

Log pile

Plenty of wildlife makes its home in dead wood, and other animals use it as a source of food. In woodlands, fallen wood occurs naturally and many species have adapted to use this habitat. But in our increasingly tidy countryside, fallen and dead wood is not so common. More...

Log pile

Meadow area

Wild flower meadows are extraordinarily beautiful and teeming with wildlife: spiders spinning webs, caterpillars munching leaves, butterflies and moths supping nectar, all sorts of bees gathering pollen, birds foraging for insects and seeds and small mammals searching for food. More...

Meadow area

Nestbox

You can encourage birds into your garden by providing plenty of places to nest. A nestbox is an excellent substitute for a tree hole and many different species will use one. More...

Nestbox

Nettle patch

The stinging nettle is one of the UK's most important native plants for wildlife. It supports more than 40 species of insect including some of our most colourful butterflies. More...

Nettle patch

Patio

At first it may seem that a patio is devoid of wildlife. But look again, you may be surprised at what you find... More...

Patio

Peanut feeder

Putting up a peanut feeder will attract plenty of birds to your garden. Many different types of feeder are available in metal and plastic. More...

Peanut feeder

Pond

A well-designed and maintained pond is a haven for all sorts of plants, birds and animals. It is a complex habitat full of algae and plants, scavengers, predators, herbivores, decomposers and parasites. More...

Pond

Rock/Stone pile

By putting pile of rocks in different places around your garden you will be providing cover for plenty of creatures. More...

Rock/Stone pile

Seed feeder

A large number of birds eat seeds and will be attracted to your garden if you hang up a seed feeder. More...

Seed feeder

Shed

Wood is a good insulator, so a shed is usually warm and dry making it ideal for a host of different creatures to find shelter here throughout the year. More...

Shed

Shrub

A border full of shrubs could be likened to a hedge, however the species grown are generally ornamental and not native. More...

Shrub

Window box

Window boxes can be good for wildlife. Even if you don't have a garden you can still plant one up, and you'll get a great view of the small creatures that visit. More...

Window box

Woodland area

Much of Britain used to be covered by woodland, and thousands of species are adapted to live in this habitat. More...

Woodland area