RSPB
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Scotland has enjoyed numerous conservation successes, from playing a key role in the reintroduction of white-tailed eagles and red kites to Scotland, to increasing the fortunes of corncrakes.

However, the challenges we face are many and varied. These include working for greater protection and better management of seas and coastlines and stamping out the the deliberate destruction of Scotland’s birds of prey that has been a prominent issue for many decades.

RSPB Scotland's work is ultimately all about conserving and enhancing biodiversity, the variety of life on the planet, both for its own sake and to underpin sustainable economic development.

We work to target our own resources effectively at the species and habitats that are most in need. We also urge the Scottish Government to channel adequate resources to this work to ensure success.

Habitats

Loch Garten, Abernethy

When ospreys returned to breed in Scotland, this ancient Caledonian pineforest is where they chose to come. The Loch Garten Osprey Centre provides fantastic views of these magnificent birds on the nest, as well as close up views thanks to our non-invasive CCTV camera. More...

Loch Garten, Abernethy

Forsinard Flows

A threatened landscape, peatlands have vanished across much of Scotland, but the RSPB is helping to preserve this vital area of internationally important habitat. Summer is the time to come, when golden plovers, hen harriers and greenshanks breed. Why not come on a guided bog walk to get up close to the fascinating flora and fauna? More...

Forsinard Flows

Copinsay

The reserve comprises the uninhabited main island of Copinsay, three smaller islets of Corn Holm, Ward Holm, Black Holm and the Horse of Copinsay. Copinsay is mainly covered in grass, with 10 ha of arable, hay and pasture managed as cover for corncrake. There are fine colonies of oysterplant and sea aster on the islands. More...

Copinsay

Species

RSPB members help to protect many species in Scotland by supporting our work. Read our in-depth accounts of projects that put your money in action.

Future of the Atlantic Marine Environment (FAME)

The FAME project will be delivered by partners from five countries who have interest, knowledge and expertise in the marine environment, ranging from seabird tracking and monitoring to mapping, data analysis and engagement with the offshore renewable energy and fisheries sectors. More...

Future of the Atlantic Marine Environment (FAME)

Wider Biodiversity Benefits of Agri-Environment Schemes designed for birds

Agri-Environment Schemes in the UK have been shown to deliver for target bird species in several cases. More...

Wider Biodiversity Benefits of Agri-Environment Schemes designed for birds

Bird sensitivity map to provide locational guidance for onshore wind farms in Scotland

A map indicating Scotland's most sensitive areas for building wind farms has been produced by the RSPB and Scottish Natural Heritage to help developers avoid the most important areas for birds. More...

Bird sensitivity map to provide locational guidance for onshore wind farms in Scotland

Causes of common scoter decline

The common scoter – despite the name – is one of Britain’s rarest breeding birds. What is more, numbers of breeding scoters have recently declined in Britain. What might be causing this decline, and how can we help this species on its British breeding grounds? More...

Causes of common scoter decline

Causes of decline of ring ouzel populations

The British breeding population of ring ouzels has been in long-term decline. As a result, they are now red-listed in the Birds of Conservation Concern, and have been made a priority Biodiversity Action Plan species. Further research to understand the underlying causes of the population decline is underway. More...

Causes of decline of ring ouzel populations

Field-layer management trials for black grouse at Corrimony

Black grouse is a UK BAP priority species, which has undergone a long-term population decline and range contraction that continues. More...

Field-layer management trials for black grouse at Corrimony

Investigating the causes of UK curlew declines

The UK breeding population of Curlews is of global importance but is rapidly declining; this project examines the causes of the decline of these moorland birds. More...

Investigating the causes of UK curlew declines

Corncrake conservation management

Corncrake populations in the UK declined for over a century but have increased 2-3 fold since conservation management began in 1993. This recovery is underpinned by scientific research on the effects of habitat management on demographic rates, which has allowed effective agri-environment and reserve management measures to be designed. More...

Corncrake conservation management

Effects of blanket bog drain blocking

Much UK blanket bog is extensively drained to improve vegetation condition for grazing and grouse, and in preparation for tree planting...... More...

Effects of blanket bog drain blocking

Determining the causes of whimbrel declines in Shetland

The UK’s breeding whimbrel population, which is now found almost exclusively on Shetland, has declined rapidly in the last 20 years. The species is red-listed, having undergone a c.50% population decline, and there may be fewer than 300 pairs remaining. Declines have been particularly severe on the northern isles of Fetlar, Unst and Yell, which in the 1980s were the core breeding areas within Shetland and held >40% of the population. Further range contraction, and extinction as a UK breeding species within the next decade, is a real possibility. Research on the causes of decline is urgently needed. More...

Determining the causes of whimbrel declines in Shetland

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