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You are browsing places tagged with the beach keyword.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Balranald

This beautiful Hebridean reserve has sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes. An information centre explains the importance of traditional crofting agriculture for corncrakes and other wildlife. Many wading and farmland birds nest on the flower-rich machair and croft-land.

Coll

Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Dungeness

If you haven't been to Dungeness, nothing can quite prepare you for this landscape - mile after mile of shingle, wild and weird! Dungeness's position, jutting into the English Channel, makes it ideally placed to watch for migrant birds arriving or departing.

Loch of Strathbeg

Britain's largest dune loch is a joy to visit any time of year. In winter, thousands of wild geese, swans and ducks fly in, including 20 per cent of the world's population of pink-footed geese - it's a sight you'll never forget.

Mersehead

Discover the breathtaking scenery and wildlife that's typical of this region. Stroll along the nature trails and use the viewing hides to explore at your own pace.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

North Warren

This delightful reserve contains grazing marshes, reedbeds, heathland and woodland. Thousands of ducks, swans and geese use the marshes in winter, while spring brings breeding bitterns, marsh harriers, woodlarks and nightingales.

Onziebust

Come during the spring and summer and you will see a wonderfully exuberant display of summer flowers and possibly the rare great yellow bumblebee.

Pilsey Island

This small reserve comprises a wide range of coastal habitats; intertidal sandflats and mudflats, fore dunes and yellow dunes, bare and vegetated shingle and saltmarsh. As well as large numbers of roosting birds, an impressive variety of unusual plants, spiders and insects exist on the reserve, thriving in the undisturbed habitats. There is no access to the reserve itself, but it can easily be viewed from surrounding rights of way.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

St Bees Head

Blow away the cobwebs with a bracing walk along the cliff top path - you can see the Isle of Man on a clear day. In spring and summer, you'll want to stop at our three viewpoints to marvel at the largest seabird colony in north-west England.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

Dingle Marshes

Dingle Marshes is a superb mixture of coastal and freshwater habitats bordered by forest and heathland.

Langstone Harbour

Langstone Harbour is a muddy estuary that attracts large numbers of birds all year round. Terns, gulls and wading birds descend to breed on the islands in spring and summer, while thousands of waders and brent geese migrate from the Arctic to feed and roost in safety here.

Culbin Sands

Truly get away from it all at this remote and unspoilt reserve. Come during the winter and you'll see sea ducks feeding offshore, while from late summer to late spring, large numbers of bar-tailed godwits, oystercatchers and knots flock at high tide.

Hobbister

This reserve is a magical mixture of land and sea, from sea cliffs to saltmarsh, from moorland to sandflats. Stroll through the moorland and you may well see hen harriers, short-eared owls and red-throated divers, all of which nest on Orkney's moorland.

Hoy

This mixture of moorland and cliff tops may be exposed to the elements, so you really do need to wrap up warm, but a visit is very rewarding. You'll see the famous Old Man of Hoy rock stack that has inspired generations of climbers, not to mention the nesting seabirds that have been known to dive-bomb them too!

Dunnet Head

The most northerly point in mainland Britain, Dunnet Head has stunning sea cliffs and coastal grassland. These are home to puffins, razorbills, guillemots, fulmars, kittiwakes, shags and cormorants, and we're undertaking some work on the grassland to make it more attractive to small farmland birds such as twites. We're also hopeful that our work here will benefit the great yellow bumblebee.

Pagham Harbour Local Nature Reserve

Pagham Harbour is a glorious and peaceful nature reserve, one of the few undeveloped stretches of the Sussex coast, and an internationally important wetland site for wildlife.