RSPB
Skip navigation
Print page

Reserves by keyword

You are browsing places tagged with the butterflies keyword.

Baron's Haugh

A real gem for wildlife and for visitors too. Spend time in one of the four hides, looking out at the ducks and swans on the haugh, or take a walk through the woods. If you're lucky you may even see a kingfisher or an otter on the river. Most paths are suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs, but may be muddy in bad weather and are steep in places. Wheelchair visitors, please call in advance for advice.

Blean Woods

This is a wonderful place for quiet walks in beautiful ancient woodland. There are five trails of up to eight miles long that meander through the woods. In summer, look out for damselflies, dragonflies and butterflies, including the rare heath fritillary butterfly. As dusk falls, you may see nightjars gliding on silent wings, and hear their churring call.

Fairburn Ings

With pond dipping, regular fun events and walks to help you get away from it all, RSPB Fairburn Ings is the ideal place for adults and children to find out more about wildlife.

Fowlmere

Fowlmere's reedbeds and pools are fed by natural chalk springs, and a chalk stream runs through the reserve. Special birds include kingfishers, water rails, and nine species of warblers, including sedge warblers, reed warblers and grasshopper warblers.

Garston Wood

This ancient wood is at its best when its breathtaking carpets of bluebells, wood anemones and primroses are in bloom (mid-April to the end of May). Look for signs of badgers and fallow deer. There are common woodland birds in spring and turtle doves in spring and summer.

Inversnaid

Inversnaid is on the east shore of Loch Lomond, where oak woodland rises steeply from the loch and gives way to open moorland with spectacular views. In the summer months you might see pied flycatchers here, as well as buzzards, while you should keep your eyes peeled for mammals, too.

Ken-Dee Marshes

With stunning views across the River Dee and Loch Ken, this tranquil reserve plays host to many exciting winter visitors, including Greenland white-fronted and greylag geese. Spring is also an excellent time to visit.

Lakenheath Fen

At Lakenheath Fen, the RSPB has converted an area of arable farmland into a large wetland. There is a new visitor centre where you can find out more about the reserve, its wildlife and history. An events programme is run throughout the year, and family explorer backpacks and trail guides are available.

Leighton Moss

Leighton Moss is the largest reedbed in north-west England, and home to some really special birds such as breeding bitterns, bearded tits and marsh harriers. You might see deer too, not to mention butterflies aplenty!

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Loch of Strathbeg

Britain's largest dune loch is a joy to visit any time of year. In winter, thousands of wild geese, swans and ducks fly in, including 20 per cent of the world's population of pink-footed geese - it's a sight you'll never forget.

Marshside

There's something for everyone all year round at this delightful coastal reserve. In the spring you can see brown hares boxing in the fields, while in the early summer you'll spot nesting birds like avocets and lapwings.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

Mull of Galloway

Everywhere you turn there's a stunning view. To the west is the Solway Firth and Irish Sea, with the Isle of Man in the distance, while all around you is the frenzied activity of a large cliff colony of sea birds, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

North Warren

This delightful reserve contains grazing marshes, reedbeds, heathland and woodland. Thousands of ducks, swans and geese use the marshes in winter, while spring brings breeding bitterns, marsh harriers, woodlarks and nightingales.

Pulborough Brooks

Set in the heart of beautiful countryside, this reserve is a fantastic day out for people of all ages. Walks lead through hedge-lined paths to viewing areas and hides where volunteers are often on hand to help point out the wildlife.

Rainham Marshes

We managed to acquire Rainham Marshes in 2000 and set about transforming it into an important place for nature and a great place for people to visit. Now you can expect to see breeding wading birds in spring and summer, and large flocks of wild ducks in winter.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

Stour Estuary

Enjoy trails up to five miles long as you stroll through a wood and watch wading birds, ducks and geese on the estuary. In spring, nightingales and other birds fill the woods with song. The spring flowers are also particularly beautiful.

Strumpshaw Fen

Walk round the reedbeds, woodlands and orchid-rich meadows and you could chance upon marsh harriers, bitterns and kingfishers. Come in spring and summer when the meadows bloom with flowers, and see an array of dragonflies and butterflies, including the spectacular swallowtail.

Surlingham Church Marsh

This small reserve provides a delightful circular walk around reedbeds, fens and pools. In spring and summer, marsh harriers, kingfishers, water rails, and reed and sedge warblers can be seen. Wetland wild flowers provide a riot of colour.

The Lodge

The Lodge nature reserve opened in 1961. The woodland, heath and acid grassland along the Greensand Ridge cover 180 hectares, and are being restored to form the largest stretch of heathland in Bedfordshire.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland's only mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills, along with several other species, including puffins. You may even be lucky enough to see porpoises, minke whales or dolphins offshore. Please take care on the cliffs.

Tudeley Woods

Get away from it all with a walk in the woods and through the newly restored heathland. In some areas there are grand old trees; in others the trees have been coppiced to open up the woodland floor and allow the woodland flowers and butterflies to flourish.

West Sedgemoor

West Sedgemoor is part of England's largest remaining wet meadow system. Set among the Somerset Levels and Moors, it has the largest lowland population of breeding wading birds such as lapwings, snipe, curlew and redshanks in southern England.

Wolves Wood

This reserve is one of the few remnants of the ancient woodland that used to cover East Anglia. The RSPB manages it using the traditional method of coppicing (a special way of cutting the trees to let light in), which means that the wood has a wide variety of birds, plants and mammals.

Vange Marsh

Vange Marsh is a mosaic of wetland habitats. Fresh and saltwater lagoons attract breeding avocets, common terns, little ringed plovers, lapwings and reed buntings. In winter, wigeons, teals and shovelers visit the site and bearded tits thrive in the reedbeds.

West Canvey Marsh

West Canvey Marsh is the largest single area of green space on Canvey Island. It's one of our South Essex Marshes nature reserves. This wetland includes nearly two miles (3 km) of new nature trails, three viewing points, a picnic area and children's adventure area.

Winterbourne Downs

At Winterbourne Downs we're re-creating species-rich chalk grassland. The reserve will form an important link between the extensive grasslands of Salisbury Plain and Porton Down. Wander through the grassland in summer and you will be delighted with the myriad of flowers and the gentle buzz of insects.

Geltsdale

Set in the beautiful North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), home to black grouse, birds of prey and breeding waders and ideal for walking. There are four waymarked trails leading from the car park at Howgill.

Elmley Marshes

If you thought that there was no wilderness left in the south-east, come and have a look at Elmley Marshes! The two-mile drive across the vast wetlands, managed by the Elmley Conservation Trust, to get to the reserve car park is an exciting start to your visit.

Northward Hill

On a ridge overlooking the Thames Marshes, Northward Hill includes a lovely bluebell wood where nightingales sing in spring. Over 100 pairs of grey herons nest in the trees, with what is one of the UK's largest and most famous colonies of little egrets.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Church Wood

This is a beautiful place for a quiet woodland walk. You can take a stroll along dappled paths through beech, ash and oak trees. In springtime you can enjoy a carpet of sweet scented bluebells and there is also a flourishing wild flower meadow.

Cwm Clydach

Enjoy a stroll through a peaceful woodland setting on a lovely summer day. You might see pied flycatchers, redstarts and buzzards, as well as dippers along the reaches of the Lower Clydach river.

Fore Wood

This is a glorious and peaceful woodland, with fascinating 'ghylls' - steep-sided little ravines in the sandstone - where rare ferns grow. In spring the reserve is a mass of bluebells and wood anemones, with early purple orchids adding to the show.

Otmoor

Otmoor is a magical nature reserve of wet meadows and reedbeds. It is a haven in winter for thousands of ducks, such as teals and wigeons, and in spring and summer for breeding wading birds, such as lapwings and redshanks.

Portmore Lough

Portmore Lough is a great day out at any time of year. In summer, the hay meadows attract a bewildering variety of insects, while in the winter greylag geese, whooper swans and thousands of ducks can be seen from the hide.

Hobbister

This reserve is a magical mixture of land and sea, from sea cliffs to saltmarsh, from moorland to sandflats. Stroll through the moorland and you may well see hen harriers, short-eared owls and red-throated divers, all of which nest on Orkney's moorland.

Top Lodge, Fineshade Wood

Fineshade Wood has a wide range of habitats and is rich in all kinds of wildlife from red kites to deer, butterflies, orchids and reptiles. Each season brings changes in the colours, sounds and smells of the woodland, making it ideal for return visits.

St Aidan's

St Aidan's is a perfect place to relax, unwind or exercise in a stress-free environment and get close to nature.

Saltholme

Saltholme has taken years of planning. Buckets of sweat and tears have gone into turning into reality our dream of an awe-inspiring nature reserve in the industrial heartland of Tees Valley. We can't wait to show off what we've got!

Mawddach Valley - Arthog Bog

Arthog Bog is a small wetland and a wonderful place to find weird and wonderful plants, flowers, butterflies and birds. With more than 130 species of plants recorded, there are colourful displays through the year and an amazing variety of birds and butterflies to see.

Mawddach Valley - Coed Garth Gell

Nestled in the spectacular Mawddach Valley, Coed Garth Gell is a woodland and heathland nature reserve. The visitor trails weave through beautiful oak woodland with a fast-flowing river in the valley bottom.

Broadwater Warren

Broadwater Warren is an exciting new RSPB reserve just south of Tunbridge Wells. Acquired in January 2007, it is currently a large area of conifer plantation, plus remnants of heathland and ancient woodland within the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Dearne Valley - Gypsy Marsh

Explore this lowland heath and fen with beautiful wildflowers including orchids, and birds like yellowhammers and reed buntings, and dingy skipper butterflies.

Langford Lowfields

We're working in partnership with Tarmac to restore a sand and gravel quarry on the River Trent into the biggest reedbed in the East Midlands. At present there is a public footpath that follows the entire perimeter of the site, giving great views of the changing landscape.

Gwenffrwd-Dinas

Enjoy a walk through enchanting alder and oak woodland, past fast-flowing, spectacular rivers. This reserve is set in the heart of the beauty of mid Wales.

Flatford Wildlife Garden

In a quiet corner of Suffolk, we have transformed an overgrown, forgotten garden into our first dedicated wildlife garden. Why not pay a visit and be inspired to garden for wildlife in your own garden!

Swell Wood

The ancient oaks of Swell Wood are part of a continuous strip of woodland extending some 10 miles along the ridge from Langport to the Blackdown Hills.

Tollie Red Kites

With stunning views across Easter Ross to Ben Wyvis, Tollie Red Kites provides close-up views of our most graceful bird of prey. A team of volunteers feed the birds every day and you can watch them feed from the comfort of a specially-converted farmstead building.

Pagham Harbour Local Nature Reserve

Pagham Harbour is a glorious and peaceful nature reserve, one of the few undeveloped stretches of the Sussex coast, and an internationally important wetland site for wildlife.