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You are browsing places tagged with the cattle keyword.

Aylesbeare Common

You can enjoy a walk along firm paths over quiet heathland here and have a chance of seeing Dartford warblers and stonechats in summer. The woodland fringes, streams and ponds abound with butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies. Stay late on a summer evening to see nightjars at dusk.

Boyton and Hollesley Marshes

Situated between the Butley river and Ore estuary, Boyton Marshes attracts breeding wading birds in spring and ducks, geese and swans in winter. It's also great for watching owls, butterflies and dragonflies.

Campfield Marsh

The reserve is made up of a mosaic of saltmarsh, peatbogs, farmland and wet grassland providing homes for a great variety of native wildlife. Trails lead to a wheelchair accessible hide looking out over the main wet grassland area where lapwings, redshanks and snipe breed in the summer and thousands of swans, ducks and geese spend the winter.

Coll

Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Fairburn Ings

With pond dipping, regular fun events and walks to help you get away from it all, RSPB Fairburn Ings is the ideal place for adults and children to find out more about wildlife.

Farnham Heath

Farnham Heath is part of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and an example of heathland restoration in progress. By clearing the dense rows of conifers, we are opening up the land to create bright sunny areas where wildlife can flourish. This is also improving the views across the Weald so you can take in the wider landscape.

Freiston Shore

At Freiston Shore you can get excellent views of waterbirds on the salt water lagoon, especially at high tide when wading birds roost, sometimes in their thousands.

Lake Vyrnwy

Our visitors' centre and well-stocked shop are the ideal places to start your visit. Join a trail through the woodland and birds are soon all around you.

Lakenheath Fen

At Lakenheath Fen, the RSPB has converted an area of arable farmland into a large wetland. There is a new visitor centre where you can find out more about the reserve, its wildlife and history. An events programme is run throughout the year, and family explorer backpacks and trail guides are available.

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Loch of Kinnordy

This shallow loch is situated in a natural basin surrounded by farmland and attracts all types of wildlife. One favourite summer visitor is the osprey, which you can see fishing around the loch, while in the winter whooper swans and geese fly in. And don't miss the hubbub of the colony of black-headed gulls.

Marshside

There's something for everyone all year round at this delightful coastal reserve. In the spring you can see brown hares boxing in the fields, while in the early summer you'll spot nesting birds like avocets and lapwings.

Mill Dam, Shapinsay

This is an ideal place for birds throughout the year. In summer, you'll see large numbers of breeding wildfowl, including pintails, redshanks and wigeons, while in the winter migrating whooper swans and other birds visit.

North Hill

Situated on the island of Papa Westray, North Hill may seem remote but it's a very exciting place to come and visit. The reserve is home to an extremely rare plant, the Scottish primrose, while stunning low level cliffs play host to nationally important numbers of breeding Arctic terns and skuas.

North Warren

This delightful reserve contains grazing marshes, reedbeds, heathland and woodland. Thousands of ducks, swans and geese use the marshes in winter, while spring brings breeding bitterns, marsh harriers, woodlarks and nightingales.

Dearne Valley - Old Moor

Situated right at the heart of the Dearne Valley, Old Moor is a wonderful place to come and watch wildlife. The skies, fields and open water are teeming with birds throughout the year.

Ouse Washes

In the heart of The Fens, the Ouse Washes forms the largest area of washland (grazing pasture that floods in the winter) in the UK. The reserve attracts thousands of ducks and swans in winter, and in spring, hundreds of snipe, lapwings and redshanks breed.

Pulborough Brooks

Set in the heart of beautiful countryside, this reserve is a fantastic day out for people of all ages. Walks lead through hedge-lined paths to viewing areas and hides where volunteers are often on hand to help point out the wildlife.

Rainham Marshes

We managed to acquire Rainham Marshes in 2000 and set about transforming it into an important place for nature and a great place for people to visit. Now you can expect to see breeding wading birds in spring and summer, and large flocks of wild ducks in winter.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Rye Meads

For a great family trip, visit this delightful wetland reserve beside the River Lee. Rye Meads is a favourite with walkers, birdwatchers and photographers too.

Surlingham Church Marsh

This small reserve provides a delightful circular walk around reedbeds, fens and pools. In spring and summer, marsh harriers, kingfishers, water rails, and reed and sedge warblers can be seen. Wetland wild flowers provide a riot of colour.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Loch Leven

Part of the Loch Leven National Nature Reserve, this is an ideal day out for all the family. If you're new to birdwatching, visit our hides for close-up views of wildlife.

West Canvey Marsh

West Canvey Marsh is the largest single area of green space on Canvey Island. It's one of our South Essex Marshes nature reserves. This wetland includes nearly two miles (3 km) of new nature trails, three viewing points, a picnic area and children's adventure area.

Winterbourne Downs

At Winterbourne Downs we're re-creating species-rich chalk grassland. The reserve will form an important link between the extensive grasslands of Salisbury Plain and Porton Down. Wander through the grassland in summer and you will be delighted with the myriad of flowers and the gentle buzz of insects.

Geltsdale

Set in the beautiful North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), home to black grouse, birds of prey and breeding waders and ideal for walking. There are four waymarked trails leading from the car park at Howgill.

Nene Washes

The Nene Washes is one of the finest areas of floodplain meadows in the UK with large numbers of breeding wading birds, including snipe and black-tailed godwits.

Elmley Marshes

If you thought that there was no wilderness left in the south-east, come and have a look at Elmley Marshes! The two-mile drive across the vast wetlands, managed by the Elmley Conservation Trust, to get to the reserve car park is an exciting start to your visit.

Old Hall Marshes

Our reserve here comprises extensive grazing marshes with brackish water fleets, reedbeds, saltmarsh and two offshore islands. In winter, thousands of wildfowl come here and summer sees breeding waders.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Saltholme

Saltholme has taken years of planning. Buckets of sweat and tears have gone into turning into reality our dream of an awe-inspiring nature reserve in the industrial heartland of Tees Valley. We can't wait to show off what we've got!

Labrador Bay

This brand new nature reserve was purchased in November 2008 to help secure the future of the cirl bunting. Being such a well-known beauty spot, offering stunning views over Lyme Bay, the site already attracts many thousands of visitors a year. But it's more than just a view!

The Loons and Loch of Banks

The Loons and Loch of Banks are the largest remaining wetlands in Orkney, and the perfect places to see wetland wildlife at its best. Enjoy the tranquillity of pools surrounded by yellow flag iris, while the sounds of wading birds, ducks and geese fill the air.

Dearne Valley - Gypsy Marsh

Explore this lowland heath and fen with beautiful wildflowers including orchids, and birds like yellowhammers and reed buntings, and dingy skipper butterflies.

Beckingham Marshes

Beckingham Marshes is a major habitat creation project on the River Trent floodplain, where we've created a wet grassland habitat.

Nigg Bay

Nigg Bay is an extensive area of mudflat, saltmarsh and wet grassland on the Cromarty Firth. Visit any time between October and March and you're sure to see countless wading birds, such as bar-tailed godwits and knots.

Bowling Green Marsh

Bowling Green Marsh is on the east bank of the Exe Estuary, within easy walking distance of both Topsham High Street and our shop at Darts Farm. It overlooks the Clyst and allows over-wintering birds a choice of safe roosting sites as the rising tide pushes them off the mudflats.

Matford Marsh

Matford Marshes is a small, relatively new site halfway between Exeter and Exminster - just 3 miles from the city centre. It's one of our Exe Estuary reserves.

Exminster and Powderham Marshes

Just five miles from Exeter city centre, Exminster and Powderham Marshes are great places to see birds all year-round. You can enjoy lovely walks here in this fascinating landscape.

Cattawade Marshes

Cattawade Marshes lies between the two arms of the River Stour on the Essex/Suffolk border. It is alive with breeding lapwings and redshanks in the spring and hundreds of ducks in the winter. The footpath on the south side of the river allows excellent views.

Eastern Moors

A landscape where there's lots to see and do, the Eastern Moors is almost entirely open access with a network of bridleways and footpaths and internationally-renowned climbing edges.