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You are browsing places tagged with the deer keyword.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Corrimony

Watch the black grouse springtime courtship displays, see the crested tits and look out for the Scottish crossbill, the only UK bird that's found in no other country. Set in stunning moorland and Caledonian forest, this beautiful reserve is a treasure trove for anyone who loves birds.

Fowlmere

Fowlmere's reedbeds and pools are fed by natural chalk springs, and a chalk stream runs through the reserve. Special birds include kingfishers, water rails, and nine species of warblers, including sedge warblers, reed warblers and grasshopper warblers.

Garston Wood

This ancient wood is at its best when its breathtaking carpets of bluebells, wood anemones and primroses are in bloom (mid-April to the end of May). Look for signs of badgers and fallow deer. There are common woodland birds in spring and turtle doves in spring and summer.

Haweswater

If you want to see a golden eagle but can't get to the Highlands of Scotland, you could try Haweswater where a male displays in the hope of attracting a mate.

Leighton Moss

Leighton Moss is the largest reedbed in north-west England, and home to some really special birds such as breeding bitterns, bearded tits and marsh harriers. You might see deer too, not to mention butterflies aplenty!

Loch Ruthven

This beautiful, tranquil loch is fringed by sedges and birch woods. Visit us in early spring, when our must-see bird, the rare Slavonian grebe, looks its best in gorgeous red and golden plumage, the jewel of the Highland Lochs.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

Pulborough Brooks

Set in the heart of beautiful countryside, this reserve is a fantastic day out for people of all ages. Walks lead through hedge-lined paths to viewing areas and hides where volunteers are often on hand to help point out the wildlife.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Dingle Marshes

Dingle Marshes is a superb mixture of coastal and freshwater habitats bordered by forest and heathland.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Glenborrodale

Here on the shore of Loch Sunart, on the rugged Ardnamurchan peninsula, wood warblers nest in the spring, along with redstarts, spotted flycatchers and common woodland birds. You may well see an otter along the shore, and seals are common.

Nagshead

Spring at Nagshead is an especially good time to visit as you can wander along the trails looking for pied flycatchers, redstarts and species of tits around the nestboxes. There are hawfinches and all three British woodpeckers in the woods all year round.

Top Lodge, Fineshade Wood

Fineshade Wood has a wide range of habitats and is rich in all kinds of wildlife from red kites to deer, butterflies, orchids and reptiles. Each season brings changes in the colours, sounds and smells of the woodland, making it ideal for return visits.

Chapel Wood

This is a fine broadleaved woodland in a beautiful and historic setting: on a steep hillside, crowned by an Iron Age hill fort, with a stream running down either side.

Swell Wood

The ancient oaks of Swell Wood are part of a continuous strip of woodland extending some 10 miles along the ridge from Langport to the Blackdown Hills.

Eastern Moors

A landscape where there's lots to see and do, the Eastern Moors is almost entirely open access with a network of bridleways and footpaths and internationally-renowned climbing edges.