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You are browsing places tagged with the fungi keyword.

Blean Woods

This is a wonderful place for quiet walks in beautiful ancient woodland. There are five trails of up to eight miles long that meander through the woods. In summer, look out for damselflies, dragonflies and butterflies, including the rare heath fritillary butterfly. As dusk falls, you may see nightjars gliding on silent wings, and hear their churring call.

Carngafallt

Carngafallt is a wonderful place to see birds or simply enjoy the view. The moorland landscape looks especially colourful in late summer, while spring is the perfect time to come and see migrant birds like redstarts, whinchats and tree pipits.

Coombes Valley

This is a delightful oak woodland to walk through - especially in spring and early summer when lots of migrating birds come to breed at the reserve. Birds you may see on the steep valley sides include flycatchers, redstarts and wood warblers. There are a wide variety of butterflies to spot too.

Corrimony

Watch the black grouse springtime courtship displays, see the crested tits and look out for the Scottish crossbill, the only UK bird that's found in no other country. Set in stunning moorland and Caledonian forest, this beautiful reserve is a treasure trove for anyone who loves birds.

Farnham Heath

Farnham Heath is part of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and an example of heathland restoration in progress. By clearing the dense rows of conifers, we are opening up the land to create bright sunny areas where wildlife can flourish. This is also improving the views across the Weald so you can take in the wider landscape.

Garston Wood

This ancient wood is at its best when its breathtaking carpets of bluebells, wood anemones and primroses are in bloom (mid-April to the end of May). Look for signs of badgers and fallow deer. There are common woodland birds in spring and turtle doves in spring and summer.

North Warren

This delightful reserve contains grazing marshes, reedbeds, heathland and woodland. Thousands of ducks, swans and geese use the marshes in winter, while spring brings breeding bitterns, marsh harriers, woodlarks and nightingales.

Stour Estuary

Enjoy trails up to five miles long as you stroll through a wood and watch wading birds, ducks and geese on the estuary. In spring, nightingales and other birds fill the woods with song. The spring flowers are also particularly beautiful.

The Lodge

The Lodge nature reserve opened in 1961. The woodland, heath and acid grassland along the Greensand Ridge cover 180 hectares, and are being restored to form the largest stretch of heathland in Bedfordshire.

Wolves Wood

This reserve is one of the few remnants of the ancient woodland that used to cover East Anglia. The RSPB manages it using the traditional method of coppicing (a special way of cutting the trees to let light in), which means that the wood has a wide variety of birds, plants and mammals.

Glenborrodale

Here on the shore of Loch Sunart, on the rugged Ardnamurchan peninsula, wood warblers nest in the spring, along with redstarts, spotted flycatchers and common woodland birds. You may well see an otter along the shore, and seals are common.

Top Lodge, Fineshade Wood

Fineshade Wood has a wide range of habitats and is rich in all kinds of wildlife from red kites to deer, butterflies, orchids and reptiles. Each season brings changes in the colours, sounds and smells of the woodland, making it ideal for return visits.

Mawddach Valley - Arthog Bog

Arthog Bog is a small wetland and a wonderful place to find weird and wonderful plants, flowers, butterflies and birds. With more than 130 species of plants recorded, there are colourful displays through the year and an amazing variety of birds and butterflies to see.

Mawddach Valley - Coed Garth Gell

Nestled in the spectacular Mawddach Valley, Coed Garth Gell is a woodland and heathland nature reserve. The visitor trails weave through beautiful oak woodland with a fast-flowing river in the valley bottom.

Broadwater Warren

Broadwater Warren is an exciting new RSPB reserve just south of Tunbridge Wells. Acquired in January 2007, it is currently a large area of conifer plantation, plus remnants of heathland and ancient woodland within the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Labrador Bay

This brand new nature reserve was purchased in November 2008 to help secure the future of the cirl bunting. Being such a well-known beauty spot, offering stunning views over Lyme Bay, the site already attracts many thousands of visitors a year. But it's more than just a view!

Chapel Wood

This is a fine broadleaved woodland in a beautiful and historic setting: on a steep hillside, crowned by an Iron Age hill fort, with a stream running down either side.

Swell Wood

The ancient oaks of Swell Wood are part of a continuous strip of woodland extending some 10 miles along the ridge from Langport to the Blackdown Hills.