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You are browsing places tagged with the island keyword.

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Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Fetlar

The whole island of Fetlar is a haven for flora and fauna, and a great place to come exploring. Along the coast you might be lucky enough to see otters. The island is full of birds in summer, including red-throated divers, golden plovers, skuas and wild rock doves.

Havergate Island

This small island in the River Ore is famous for its breeding avocets and terns, which can be seen throughout the spring and summer. Access is by boat only and the trip to the island helps you really feel you're getting away from it all.

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Lower Lough Erne Islands

Lough Erne is one of the largest freshwater lakes in the UK. Take a leisurely stroll around the forest trails and look across to some of the 40 islands that make up most of the reserve, two of which you can visit by boat.

Mill Dam, Shapinsay

This is an ideal place for birds throughout the year. In summer, you'll see large numbers of breeding wildfowl, including pintails, redshanks and wigeons, while in the winter migrating whooper swans and other birds visit.

Mousa

Visiting Mousa is an unforgettable experience. On the short ferry ride to the island, you might be fortunate enough to see harbour porpoises and other marine mammals. In August, the island is home to over 200 hauled-out common seals. Mousa is rich in plantlife and birdlife, and is notable for breeding seabirds and waders.

North Hill

Situated on the island of Papa Westray, North Hill may seem remote but it's a very exciting place to come and visit. The reserve is home to an extremely rare plant, the Scottish primrose, while stunning low level cliffs play host to nationally important numbers of breeding Arctic terns and skuas.

Onziebust

Come during the spring and summer and you will see a wonderfully exuberant display of summer flowers and possibly the rare great yellow bumblebee.

Pilsey Island

This small reserve comprises a wide range of coastal habitats; intertidal sandflats and mudflats, fore dunes and yellow dunes, bare and vegetated shingle and saltmarsh. As well as large numbers of roosting birds, an impressive variety of unusual plants, spiders and insects exist on the reserve, thriving in the undisturbed habitats. There is no access to the reserve itself, but it can easily be viewed from surrounding rights of way.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Rathlin Island

Rathlin Island has a rare, untamed beauty. The wildlife is evident before you step ashore - the ferry crossing presents many opportunities to spot auks, gannets and gulls with even a chance of porpoises or dolphins.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

South Stack Cliffs

Enjoy a close-up view onto a wonderful cliff-side nesting colony, with binoculars and telescopes provided. You'll be able to watch guillemots, razorbills and puffins all raising their young, while live television pictures give you an even closer view of the nests! Rare choughs can also be seen on the reserve.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Ailsa Craig

Ailsa Craig lies nine miles offshore, rising to 1,109 feet. The dramatic seacliffs are home to the third largest gannetry in the UK - comprising 36,000 pairs - with a supporting cast of guillemots, razorbills, black guillemots and increasing numbers of puffins.

Birsay Moors

If you enjoy the solemn grandeur of moorland landscape, the Orkney moors can be a wonderful place to visit, full of wild and windswept beauty. Come during the summer to see hen harriers, short-eared owls and elegant Arctic skuas nesting.

Hobbister

This reserve is a magical mixture of land and sea, from sea cliffs to saltmarsh, from moorland to sandflats. Stroll through the moorland and you may well see hen harriers, short-eared owls and red-throated divers, all of which nest on Orkney's moorland.

Hoy

This mixture of moorland and cliff tops may be exposed to the elements, so you really do need to wrap up warm, but a visit is very rewarding. You'll see the famous Old Man of Hoy rock stack that has inspired generations of climbers, not to mention the nesting seabirds that have been known to dive-bomb them too!