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You are browsing places tagged with the orchids keyword.

Aylesbeare Common

You can enjoy a walk along firm paths over quiet heathland here and have a chance of seeing Dartford warblers and stonechats in summer. The woodland fringes, streams and ponds abound with butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies. Stay late on a summer evening to see nightjars at dusk.

Corrimony

Watch the black grouse springtime courtship displays, see the crested tits and look out for the Scottish crossbill, the only UK bird that's found in no other country. Set in stunning moorland and Caledonian forest, this beautiful reserve is a treasure trove for anyone who loves birds.

Fetlar

The whole island of Fetlar is a haven for flora and fauna, and a great place to come exploring. Along the coast you might be lucky enough to see otters. The island is full of birds in summer, including red-throated divers, golden plovers, skuas and wild rock doves.

Garston Wood

This ancient wood is at its best when its breathtaking carpets of bluebells, wood anemones and primroses are in bloom (mid-April to the end of May). Look for signs of badgers and fallow deer. There are common woodland birds in spring and turtle doves in spring and summer.

Loch na Muilne

Loch na Muilne is a fantastic place to see a variety of breeding birds. During spring and summer, its most special inhabitants are red-necked phalaropes - tiny wading birds which feed by swimming on the loch in search of insects. Unusually, the female is more colourful than the male and performs most of the courtship rituals.

Lodmoor

The large reedbed, open water, saltmarsh, wet grassland and bushes attract many different birds. Bearded tits and Cetti's warblers can be seen all year and autumn migration can be spectacular, with hundreds of swallows, martins and wagtails, as well as lots of wading birds.

Radipole Lake

A nature reserve in central Weymouth sounds unlikely, but once you are on the footpath amongst the reeds and lagoons you could be far away in the countryside.

Rathlin Island

Rathlin Island has a rare, untamed beauty. The wildlife is evident before you step ashore - the ferry crossing presents many opportunities to spot auks, gannets and gulls with even a chance of porpoises or dolphins.

Strumpshaw Fen

Walk round the reedbeds, woodlands and orchid-rich meadows and you could chance upon marsh harriers, bitterns and kingfishers. Come in spring and summer when the meadows bloom with flowers, and see an array of dragonflies and butterflies, including the spectacular swallowtail.

Tudeley Woods

Get away from it all with a walk in the woods and through the newly restored heathland. In some areas there are grand old trees; in others the trees have been coppiced to open up the woodland floor and allow the woodland flowers and butterflies to flourish.

West Sedgemoor

West Sedgemoor is part of England's largest remaining wet meadow system. Set among the Somerset Levels and Moors, it has the largest lowland population of breeding wading birds such as lapwings, snipe, curlew and redshanks in southern England.

Newport Wetlands

This nature reserve offers a haven for wildlife on the edge of the city, but is a great place for people too with a new RSPB visitor centre, a café, shop and children's play area.

Nagshead

Spring at Nagshead is an especially good time to visit as you can wander along the trails looking for pied flycatchers, redstarts and species of tits around the nestboxes. There are hawfinches and all three British woodpeckers in the woods all year round.

Hoy

This mixture of moorland and cliff tops may be exposed to the elements, so you really do need to wrap up warm, but a visit is very rewarding. You'll see the famous Old Man of Hoy rock stack that has inspired generations of climbers, not to mention the nesting seabirds that have been known to dive-bomb them too!

Top Lodge, Fineshade Wood

Fineshade Wood has a wide range of habitats and is rich in all kinds of wildlife from red kites to deer, butterflies, orchids and reptiles. Each season brings changes in the colours, sounds and smells of the woodland, making it ideal for return visits.

Dearne Valley - Gypsy Marsh

Explore this lowland heath and fen with beautiful wildflowers including orchids, and birds like yellowhammers and reed buntings, and dingy skipper butterflies.