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You are browsing places tagged with the saltmarsh keyword.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Boyton and Hollesley Marshes

Situated between the Butley river and Ore estuary, Boyton Marshes attracts breeding wading birds in spring and ducks, geese and swans in winter. It's also great for watching owls, butterflies and dragonflies.

Campfield Marsh

The reserve is made up of a mosaic of saltmarsh, peatbogs, farmland and wet grassland providing homes for a great variety of native wildlife. Trails lead to a wheelchair accessible hide looking out over the main wet grassland area where lapwings, redshanks and snipe breed in the summer and thousands of swans, ducks and geese spend the winter.

Conwy

Situated on the banks of the Conwy estuary, with magnificent views of Snowdonia and Conwy Castle, this reserve is delightful at any time of year. Birds can always be seen from the visitor centre, and our friendly experts can help you spot godwits and shelducks, or any of the more than 200 different species that have been seen at this reserve.

Freiston Shore

At Freiston Shore you can get excellent views of waterbirds on the salt water lagoon, especially at high tide when wading birds roost, sometimes in their thousands.

Havergate Island

This small island in the River Ore is famous for its breeding avocets and terns, which can be seen throughout the spring and summer. Access is by boat only and the trip to the island helps you really feel you're getting away from it all.

Hayle Estuary

In cold winters, as many as 18,000 birds have been seen here, because this most south westerly estuary in the UK never freezes. During spring and autumn, it is an ideal place to see migrant wading birds, gulls and terns.

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Pilsey Island

This small reserve comprises a wide range of coastal habitats; intertidal sandflats and mudflats, fore dunes and yellow dunes, bare and vegetated shingle and saltmarsh. As well as large numbers of roosting birds, an impressive variety of unusual plants, spiders and insects exist on the reserve, thriving in the undisturbed habitats. There is no access to the reserve itself, but it can easily be viewed from surrounding rights of way.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

Ynys-hir

Ynys-hir mixes Welsh oak woodland with wet grassland and saltmarshes. Feast your eyes from any of our seven hides - look out for birds of prey. Then round off your visit with a snack at the visitors' centre.

Isley Marsh

Isley Marsh is made up of saltmarsh and intertidal mudflats on the southern edge of the Taw Torridge estuary. It is an important haven in the busy estuary for undisturbed feeding and resting birds, especially the wintering flocks of ducks and waders.

Tetney Marshes

Tetney Marshes covers a vast area of coastal mudflats, salt marsh, dunes and saline lagoons on the north Lincolnshire coast. The reserve forms an important part of the Humber, which is one of the top five estuaries for birds in the UK, with at least 175,000 birds using the estuary during the winter months.

West Canvey Marsh

West Canvey Marsh is the largest single area of green space on Canvey Island. It's one of our South Essex Marshes nature reserves. This wetland includes nearly two miles (3 km) of new nature trails, three viewing points, a picnic area and children's adventure area.

Adur Estuary

The small reserve is composed of saltmarsh and mudflats that afford a good feeding and roosting site for waders and wildfowl. The reserve has no facilities as such, but it can be readily viewed from the surrounding footpaths and rewarding views can be had from Coronation Green, which is situated near the town centre of Shoreham-by-Sea.

Langstone Harbour

Langstone Harbour is a muddy estuary that attracts large numbers of birds all year round. Terns, gulls and wading birds descend to breed on the islands in spring and summer, while thousands of waders and brent geese migrate from the Arctic to feed and roost in safety here.

Nor Marsh and Motney Hill

Nor Marsh is a saltmarsh island in the Medway Estuary. To the east is Motney Hill, another area of mud and saltmarsh. In winter at both sites, large numbers of wildfowl can be seen. In spring and autumn, look out for black-tailed godwits.

Old Hall Marshes

Our reserve here comprises extensive grazing marshes with brackish water fleets, reedbeds, saltmarsh and two offshore islands. In winter, thousands of wildfowl come here and summer sees breeding waders.

Frampton Marsh

A major new extension to this coastal wetland reserve includes a reedbed, large freshwater scrapes and wet grassland. These habitats have all been created to bring the wildlife of the Wash closer to you.

Dee Estuary - Parkgate

Come to Parkgate to see ducks, geese, wading birds and birds of prey exploring the marsh. During low tides, birds stay far out on the estuary, so the best time to visit is during high tide. That's when you could get great, close-up views of birds of prey hunting, or wading birds, depending on the season.

Hobbister

This reserve is a magical mixture of land and sea, from sea cliffs to saltmarsh, from moorland to sandflats. Stroll through the moorland and you may well see hen harriers, short-eared owls and red-throated divers, all of which nest on Orkney's moorland.

South Essex Marshes

The Visitor Centre and Discovery Zone are located within Basildon District Council's Wat Tyler Country Park and are the gateway to our South Essex Marshes reserves.

Nigg Bay

Nigg Bay is an extensive area of mudflat, saltmarsh and wet grassland on the Cromarty Firth. Visit any time between October and March and you're sure to see countless wading birds, such as bar-tailed godwits and knots.

Lough Foyle

These remote mudflats and fields are the ideal place to see brent geese, whooper swans and wigeons in the early winter months. The best vantage points are on the minor roads off the A2 between Limavady and Londonderry.

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe.

Crook of Baldoon

The view that opens up in front of you is breathtaking. Cairnsmore of Fleet and the Galloway Hills act as a backdrop to wild saltmarsh and mudflats which positively ooze with birdlife. Watch thousands of wading birds wheel in the sky in a mesmerising display.

Pagham Harbour Local Nature Reserve

Pagham Harbour is a glorious and peaceful nature reserve, one of the few undeveloped stretches of the Sussex coast, and an internationally important wetland site for wildlife.