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You are browsing places tagged with the scenic keyword.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Aylesbeare Common

You can enjoy a walk along firm paths over quiet heathland here and have a chance of seeing Dartford warblers and stonechats in summer. The woodland fringes, streams and ponds abound with butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies. Stay late on a summer evening to see nightjars at dusk.

Balranald

This beautiful Hebridean reserve has sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes. An information centre explains the importance of traditional crofting agriculture for corncrakes and other wildlife. Many wading and farmland birds nest on the flower-rich machair and croft-land.

Campfield Marsh

The reserve is made up of a mosaic of saltmarsh, peatbogs, farmland and wet grassland providing homes for a great variety of native wildlife. Trails lead to a wheelchair accessible hide looking out over the main wet grassland area where lapwings, redshanks and snipe breed in the summer and thousands of swans, ducks and geese spend the winter.

Coll

Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Fairburn Ings

With pond dipping, regular fun events and walks to help you get away from it all, RSPB Fairburn Ings is the ideal place for adults and children to find out more about wildlife.

Farnham Heath

Farnham Heath is part of the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and an example of heathland restoration in progress. By clearing the dense rows of conifers, we are opening up the land to create bright sunny areas where wildlife can flourish. This is also improving the views across the Weald so you can take in the wider landscape.

Forsinard Flows

A threatened landscape, peatlands have vanished across much of Scotland, but the RSPB is helping to preserve this vital area of internationally important habitat. Summer is the time to come, when golden plovers, hen harriers and greenshanks breed. Why not come on a guided bog walk to get up close to the fascinating flora and fauna?

Fowlsheugh

If you're new to birdwatching, what better way to see the beauty of birds close up than by visiting a seabird cliff colony? The spectacular cliffs at Fowlsheugh are packed with 130,000 breeding seabirds in the spring and summer, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

Lake Vyrnwy

Our visitors' centre and well-stocked shop are the ideal places to start your visit. Join a trail through the woodland and birds are soon all around you.

Loch of Strathbeg

Britain's largest dune loch is a joy to visit any time of year. In winter, thousands of wild geese, swans and ducks fly in, including 20 per cent of the world's population of pink-footed geese - it's a sight you'll never forget.

Loch Ruthven

This beautiful, tranquil loch is fringed by sedges and birch woods. Visit us in early spring, when our must-see bird, the rare Slavonian grebe, looks its best in gorgeous red and golden plumage, the jewel of the Highland Lochs.

Marazion Marsh

This reserve overlooks the beautiful St Michael's Mount and boasts Cornwall's largest reedbed. More than 250 bird, 500 plant, 500 insect and 18 mammal species have been recorded here and bitterns are now regular winter visitors (although patience is required to see them).

Marshside

There's something for everyone all year round at this delightful coastal reserve. In the spring you can see brown hares boxing in the fields, while in the early summer you'll spot nesting birds like avocets and lapwings.

Mersehead

Discover the breathtaking scenery and wildlife that's typical of this region. Stroll along the nature trails and use the viewing hides to explore at your own pace.

Mill Dam, Shapinsay

This is an ideal place for birds throughout the year. In summer, you'll see large numbers of breeding wildfowl, including pintails, redshanks and wigeons, while in the winter migrating whooper swans and other birds visit.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

Mousa

Visiting Mousa is an unforgettable experience. On the short ferry ride to the island, you might be fortunate enough to see harbour porpoises and other marine mammals. In August, the island is home to over 200 hauled-out common seals. Mousa is rich in plantlife and birdlife, and is notable for breeding seabirds and waders.

North Hill

Situated on the island of Papa Westray, North Hill may seem remote but it's a very exciting place to come and visit. The reserve is home to an extremely rare plant, the Scottish primrose, while stunning low level cliffs play host to nationally important numbers of breeding Arctic terns and skuas.

Noup Cliffs

Reaching over 76 metres above the sea, these dramatic cliffs house Orkney's largest seabird colony. Once seen, it's never forgotten! Walk along the cliff path in the summer and you'll see an array of wildflowers, while below you on the cliffs, guillemots, kittiwakes and razorbills will be nesting.

Onziebust

Come during the spring and summer and you will see a wonderfully exuberant display of summer flowers and possibly the rare great yellow bumblebee.

Pulborough Brooks

Set in the heart of beautiful countryside, this reserve is a fantastic day out for people of all ages. Walks lead through hedge-lined paths to viewing areas and hides where volunteers are often on hand to help point out the wildlife.

Rainham Marshes

We managed to acquire Rainham Marshes in 2000 and set about transforming it into an important place for nature and a great place for people to visit. Now you can expect to see breeding wading birds in spring and summer, and large flocks of wild ducks in winter.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Rathlin Island

Rathlin Island has a rare, untamed beauty. The wildlife is evident before you step ashore - the ferry crossing presents many opportunities to spot auks, gannets and gulls with even a chance of porpoises or dolphins.

Rockland Marshes

This small reserve provides views over Rockland Broad, the River Yare, reedbeds and open grazing marshes, via a wheelchair-friendly path. A hide overlooks the Broad, where in spring and summer, kingfishers and great crested grebes can be seen. Along the path, wetland warblers can be seen and barn owls often hunt.

Sandwell Valley

You can escape for an hour or two at this oasis for wildlife, less than 5 miles from the centre of Birmingham.

South Stack Cliffs

Enjoy a close-up view onto a wonderful cliff-side nesting colony, with binoculars and telescopes provided. You'll be able to watch guillemots, razorbills and puffins all raising their young, while live television pictures give you an even closer view of the nests! Rare choughs can also be seen on the reserve.

Strumpshaw Fen

Walk round the reedbeds, woodlands and orchid-rich meadows and you could chance upon marsh harriers, bitterns and kingfishers. Come in spring and summer when the meadows bloom with flowers, and see an array of dragonflies and butterflies, including the spectacular swallowtail.

Sumburgh Head

Visit these cliffs during the summer and you'll be privileged to witness the amazing spectacle of thousands of breeding seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, shags and fulmars. Sumburgh Head is a great place to watch for whales and dolphins, particularly minke whales and orcas.

The Lodge

The Lodge nature reserve opened in 1961. The woodland, heath and acid grassland along the Greensand Ridge cover 180 hectares, and are being restored to form the largest stretch of heathland in Bedfordshire.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland's only mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills, along with several other species, including puffins. You may even be lucky enough to see porpoises, minke whales or dolphins offshore. Please take care on the cliffs.

Trumland

The best time to visit this typical piece of Orkney moorland is during the summer months, when you should see breeding red-throated divers, hen harriers, merlins and short-eared owls.

Loch Leven

Part of the Loch Leven National Nature Reserve, this is an ideal day out for all the family. If you're new to birdwatching, visit our hides for close-up views of wildlife.

West Sedgemoor

West Sedgemoor is part of England's largest remaining wet meadow system. Set among the Somerset Levels and Moors, it has the largest lowland population of breeding wading birds such as lapwings, snipe, curlew and redshanks in southern England.

Wood of Cree

The Wood of Cree is the largest ancient wood in southern Scotland. In spring, the woodland really comes alive, with bluebells on the ground and birdsong in the air. The wood is the perfect place to see willow tits, which are declining in the UK, as well as barn and tawny owls.

Ynys-hir

Ynys-hir mixes Welsh oak woodland with wet grassland and saltmarshes. Feast your eyes from any of our seven hides - look out for birds of prey. Then round off your visit with a snack at the visitors' centre.

Newport Wetlands

This nature reserve offers a haven for wildlife on the edge of the city, but is a great place for people too with a new RSPB visitor centre, a café, shop and children's play area.

Coquet Island

This important seabird colony is one mile off the Northumberland coast. No landing is possible on the island, but during the breeding season you can get close-up views of the birds by taking a boat trip around the island.

Isley Marsh

Isley Marsh is made up of saltmarsh and intertidal mudflats on the southern edge of the Taw Torridge estuary. It is an important haven in the busy estuary for undisturbed feeding and resting birds, especially the wintering flocks of ducks and waders.

Winterbourne Downs

At Winterbourne Downs we're re-creating species-rich chalk grassland. The reserve will form an important link between the extensive grasslands of Salisbury Plain and Porton Down. Wander through the grassland in summer and you will be delighted with the myriad of flowers and the gentle buzz of insects.

Geltsdale

Set in the beautiful North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), home to black grouse, birds of prey and breeding waders and ideal for walking. There are four waymarked trails leading from the car park at Howgill.

Nor Marsh and Motney Hill

Nor Marsh is a saltmarsh island in the Medway Estuary. To the east is Motney Hill, another area of mud and saltmarsh. In winter at both sites, large numbers of wildfowl can be seen. In spring and autumn, look out for black-tailed godwits.

Northward Hill

On a ridge overlooking the Thames Marshes, Northward Hill includes a lovely bluebell wood where nightingales sing in spring. Over 100 pairs of grey herons nest in the trees, with what is one of the UK's largest and most famous colonies of little egrets.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Culbin Sands

Truly get away from it all at this remote and unspoilt reserve. Come during the winter and you'll see sea ducks feeding offshore, while from late summer to late spring, large numbers of bar-tailed godwits, oystercatchers and knots flock at high tide.

Glenborrodale

Here on the shore of Loch Sunart, on the rugged Ardnamurchan peninsula, wood warblers nest in the spring, along with redstarts, spotted flycatchers and common woodland birds. You may well see an otter along the shore, and seals are common.

Birsay Moors

If you enjoy the solemn grandeur of moorland landscape, the Orkney moors can be a wonderful place to visit, full of wild and windswept beauty. Come during the summer to see hen harriers, short-eared owls and elegant Arctic skuas nesting.

Hobbister

This reserve is a magical mixture of land and sea, from sea cliffs to saltmarsh, from moorland to sandflats. Stroll through the moorland and you may well see hen harriers, short-eared owls and red-throated divers, all of which nest on Orkney's moorland.

Hoy

This mixture of moorland and cliff tops may be exposed to the elements, so you really do need to wrap up warm, but a visit is very rewarding. You'll see the famous Old Man of Hoy rock stack that has inspired generations of climbers, not to mention the nesting seabirds that have been known to dive-bomb them too!

Top Lodge, Fineshade Wood

Fineshade Wood has a wide range of habitats and is rich in all kinds of wildlife from red kites to deer, butterflies, orchids and reptiles. Each season brings changes in the colours, sounds and smells of the woodland, making it ideal for return visits.

Dearne Valley - Bolton Ings

This new reserve gives you a chance to get up close to a reedbed and its fascinating inhabitants. Bitterns come to spend winter camouflaged amongst the reeds and we hope they'll stay to breed soon. It's easy to access from the Dearne Way footpath and Trans Pennine Trail.

Saltholme

Saltholme has taken years of planning. Buckets of sweat and tears have gone into turning into reality our dream of an awe-inspiring nature reserve in the industrial heartland of Tees Valley. We can't wait to show off what we've got!

Mawddach Valley - Coed Garth Gell

Nestled in the spectacular Mawddach Valley, Coed Garth Gell is a woodland and heathland nature reserve. The visitor trails weave through beautiful oak woodland with a fast-flowing river in the valley bottom.

Morecambe Bay - Hest Bank

The sandflats and saltmarshes of Morecambe Bay are vital feeding grounds for a quarter of a million wading birds, ducks and geese. It's the second most important estuary in the UK and is protected by European and UK law. You can get great views of the spectacular flocks of birds.

Labrador Bay

This brand new nature reserve was purchased in November 2008 to help secure the future of the cirl bunting. Being such a well-known beauty spot, offering stunning views over Lyme Bay, the site already attracts many thousands of visitors a year. But it's more than just a view!

Hesketh Out Marsh

This new saltmarsh reserve is a great place to admire the gathered pink-footed geese, wigeons, teals and other wildfowl in winter, along with big flocks of golden plovers, lapwings and black-tailed godwits. In spring the marshes are alive with the sight and sound of displaying waders, including avocets and lapwings. But as recently as 2006, the land was used for growing crops.

Marwick Head

This remote headland has spectacular displays of wild flowers, including sea campion, thrift and spring squill. In spring and summer, thousands of seabirds nest on the cliffs. In August, look out for great yellow bumblebees.

South Essex Marshes

The Visitor Centre and Discovery Zone are located within Basildon District Council's Wat Tyler Country Park and are the gateway to our South Essex Marshes reserves.

Ribble Discovery Centre

Come to our visitor centre on the edge of Fairhaven Lake. It's the gateway to the north side of the Ribble Estuary - the most important single river estuary in the UK - which attracts over 270,000 birds each year.

Aghatirourke

Aghatirourke is part of the Cuilcagh Mountain World Geopark in County Fermanagh. It's an area of extensive upland blanket bog habitat bordered by limestone grassland to the north, and montane heath on the summit to the south.

Langford Lowfields

We're working in partnership with Tarmac to restore a sand and gravel quarry on the River Trent into the biggest reedbed in the East Midlands. At present there is a public footpath that follows the entire perimeter of the site, giving great views of the changing landscape.

Dove Stone

A landscape that will take your breath away. Towering hills, sheer rock faces, swathes of open moorland, a picturesque reservoir - that's Dove Stone, the northern gateway to the Peak District National Park.

Crook of Baldoon

The view that opens up in front of you is breathtaking. Cairnsmore of Fleet and the Galloway Hills act as a backdrop to wild saltmarsh and mudflats which positively ooze with birdlife. Watch thousands of wading birds wheel in the sky in a mesmerising display.

Swell Wood

The ancient oaks of Swell Wood are part of a continuous strip of woodland extending some 10 miles along the ridge from Langport to the Blackdown Hills.