RSPB
Skip navigation
Print page

Reserves by keyword

You are browsing places tagged with the seals keyword.

Fowlsheugh

If you're new to birdwatching, what better way to see the beauty of birds close up than by visiting a seabird cliff colony? The spectacular cliffs at Fowlsheugh are packed with 130,000 breeding seabirds in the spring and summer, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

Loch of Strathbeg

Britain's largest dune loch is a joy to visit any time of year. In winter, thousands of wild geese, swans and ducks fly in, including 20 per cent of the world's population of pink-footed geese - it's a sight you'll never forget.

Mousa

Visiting Mousa is an unforgettable experience. On the short ferry ride to the island, you might be fortunate enough to see harbour porpoises and other marine mammals. In August, the island is home to over 200 hauled-out common seals. Mousa is rich in plantlife and birdlife, and is notable for breeding seabirds and waders.

Mull of Galloway

Everywhere you turn there's a stunning view. To the west is the Solway Firth and Irish Sea, with the Isle of Man in the distance, while all around you is the frenzied activity of a large cliff colony of sea birds, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

North Hill

Situated on the island of Papa Westray, North Hill may seem remote but it's a very exciting place to come and visit. The reserve is home to an extremely rare plant, the Scottish primrose, while stunning low level cliffs play host to nationally important numbers of breeding Arctic terns and skuas.

Noup Cliffs

Reaching over 76 metres above the sea, these dramatic cliffs house Orkney's largest seabird colony. Once seen, it's never forgotten! Walk along the cliff path in the summer and you'll see an array of wildflowers, while below you on the cliffs, guillemots, kittiwakes and razorbills will be nesting.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

St Bees Head

Blow away the cobwebs with a bracing walk along the cliff top path - you can see the Isle of Man on a clear day. In spring and summer, you'll want to stop at our three viewpoints to marvel at the largest seabird colony in north-west England.

Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland's only mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills, along with several other species, including puffins. You may even be lucky enough to see porpoises, minke whales or dolphins offshore. Please take care on the cliffs.

Coquet Island

This important seabird colony is one mile off the Northumberland coast. No landing is possible on the island, but during the breeding season you can get close-up views of the birds by taking a boat trip around the island.

Dunnet Head

The most northerly point in mainland Britain, Dunnet Head has stunning sea cliffs and coastal grassland. These are home to puffins, razorbills, guillemots, fulmars, kittiwakes, shags and cormorants, and we're undertaking some work on the grassland to make it more attractive to small farmland birds such as twites. We're also hopeful that our work here will benefit the great yellow bumblebee.

Saltholme

Saltholme has taken years of planning. Buckets of sweat and tears have gone into turning into reality our dream of an awe-inspiring nature reserve in the industrial heartland of Tees Valley. We can't wait to show off what we've got!

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe.