RSPB
Skip navigation
Print page

Reserves by keyword

You are browsing places tagged with the spectacular keyword.

Loch Garten, Abernethy

When ospreys returned to breed in Scotland, this ancient Caledonian pineforest is where they chose to come. The Loch Garten Osprey Centre provides fantastic views of these magnificent birds on the nest, as well as close up views thanks to our non-invasive CCTV camera.

Balranald

This beautiful Hebridean reserve has sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes. An information centre explains the importance of traditional crofting agriculture for corncrakes and other wildlife. Many wading and farmland birds nest on the flower-rich machair and croft-land.

Bempton Cliffs

A family favourite, and easily the best place in England to see, hear and smell seabirds! More than 200,000 birds (from April to August) make the cliffs seem alive - with adults bringing food to their nests, or young chicks making their first faltering flights.

Carngafallt

Carngafallt is a wonderful place to see birds or simply enjoy the view. The moorland landscape looks especially colourful in late summer, while spring is the perfect time to come and see migrant birds like redstarts, whinchats and tree pipits.

Cliffe Pools

Cliffe Pools nature reserve offers a spectacular landscape of open water and big skies. The reserve is one of the most important places for wildlife in the UK with huge flocks of wetland birds. A number of nature trails cross the reserve, affording great views of the pools, wildlife and the River Thames which runs alongside.

Dungeness

If you haven't been to Dungeness, nothing can quite prepare you for this landscape - mile after mile of shingle, wild and weird! Dungeness's position, jutting into the English Channel, makes it ideally placed to watch for migrant birds arriving or departing.

Inversnaid

Inversnaid is on the east shore of Loch Lomond, where oak woodland rises steeply from the loch and gives way to open moorland with spectacular views. In the summer months you might see pied flycatchers here, as well as buzzards, while you should keep your eyes peeled for mammals, too.

Leighton Moss

Leighton Moss is the largest reedbed in north-west England, and home to some really special birds such as breeding bitterns, bearded tits and marsh harriers. You might see deer too, not to mention butterflies aplenty!

Mersehead

Discover the breathtaking scenery and wildlife that's typical of this region. Stroll along the nature trails and use the viewing hides to explore at your own pace.

Mousa

Visiting Mousa is an unforgettable experience. On the short ferry ride to the island, you might be fortunate enough to see harbour porpoises and other marine mammals. In August, the island is home to over 200 hauled-out common seals. Mousa is rich in plantlife and birdlife, and is notable for breeding seabirds and waders.

Noup Cliffs

Reaching over 76 metres above the sea, these dramatic cliffs house Orkney's largest seabird colony. Once seen, it's never forgotten! Walk along the cliff path in the summer and you'll see an array of wildflowers, while below you on the cliffs, guillemots, kittiwakes and razorbills will be nesting.

Ouse Washes

In the heart of The Fens, the Ouse Washes forms the largest area of washland (grazing pasture that floods in the winter) in the UK. The reserve attracts thousands of ducks and swans in winter, and in spring, hundreds of snipe, lapwings and redshanks breed.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

Sumburgh Head

Visit these cliffs during the summer and you'll be privileged to witness the amazing spectacle of thousands of breeding seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, shags and fulmars. Sumburgh Head is a great place to watch for whales and dolphins, particularly minke whales and orcas.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

Coquet Island

This important seabird colony is one mile off the Northumberland coast. No landing is possible on the island, but during the breeding season you can get close-up views of the birds by taking a boat trip around the island.

Isley Marsh

Isley Marsh is made up of saltmarsh and intertidal mudflats on the southern edge of the Taw Torridge estuary. It is an important haven in the busy estuary for undisturbed feeding and resting birds, especially the wintering flocks of ducks and waders.

Geltsdale

Set in the beautiful North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), home to black grouse, birds of prey and breeding waders and ideal for walking. There are four waymarked trails leading from the car park at Howgill.

Nene Washes

The Nene Washes is one of the finest areas of floodplain meadows in the UK with large numbers of breeding wading birds, including snipe and black-tailed godwits.

Brodgar

Could there be a more spellbinding and mystical setting? This reserve surrounds the monument of the ring of Brodgar. Visit during the summer and hear the unmistakable bubbling cries of the curlews and the drumming of the snipe. You should also be able to see lapwings, dunlins, redshanks and oystercatchers.

Dunnet Head

The most northerly point in mainland Britain, Dunnet Head has stunning sea cliffs and coastal grassland. These are home to puffins, razorbills, guillemots, fulmars, kittiwakes, shags and cormorants, and we're undertaking some work on the grassland to make it more attractive to small farmland birds such as twites. We're also hopeful that our work here will benefit the great yellow bumblebee.

Mawddach Valley - Coed Garth Gell

Nestled in the spectacular Mawddach Valley, Coed Garth Gell is a woodland and heathland nature reserve. The visitor trails weave through beautiful oak woodland with a fast-flowing river in the valley bottom.

Morecambe Bay - Hest Bank

The sandflats and saltmarshes of Morecambe Bay are vital feeding grounds for a quarter of a million wading birds, ducks and geese. It's the second most important estuary in the UK and is protected by European and UK law. You can get great views of the spectacular flocks of birds.

Marwick Head

This remote headland has spectacular displays of wild flowers, including sea campion, thrift and spring squill. In spring and summer, thousands of seabirds nest on the cliffs. In August, look out for great yellow bumblebees.

Snape

Snape is an exciting new reserve where we're recreating important wetland and heathland areas.

Dove Stone

A landscape that will take your breath away. Towering hills, sheer rock faces, swathes of open moorland, a picturesque reservoir - that's Dove Stone, the northern gateway to the Peak District National Park.

Bowling Green Marsh

Bowling Green Marsh is on the east bank of the Exe Estuary, within easy walking distance of both Topsham High Street and our shop at Darts Farm. It overlooks the Clyst and allows over-wintering birds a choice of safe roosting sites as the rising tide pushes them off the mudflats.

Crook of Baldoon

The view that opens up in front of you is breathtaking. Cairnsmore of Fleet and the Galloway Hills act as a backdrop to wild saltmarsh and mudflats which positively ooze with birdlife. Watch thousands of wading birds wheel in the sky in a mesmerising display.