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You are browsing places tagged with the tranquil keyword.

Loch Garten, Abernethy

When ospreys returned to breed in Scotland, this ancient Caledonian pineforest is where they chose to come. The Loch Garten Osprey Centre provides fantastic views of these magnificent birds on the nest, as well as close up views thanks to our non-invasive CCTV camera.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Aylesbeare Common

You can enjoy a walk along firm paths over quiet heathland here and have a chance of seeing Dartford warblers and stonechats in summer. The woodland fringes, streams and ponds abound with butterflies, dragonflies and damselflies. Stay late on a summer evening to see nightjars at dusk.

Balranald

This beautiful Hebridean reserve has sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes. An information centre explains the importance of traditional crofting agriculture for corncrakes and other wildlife. Many wading and farmland birds nest on the flower-rich machair and croft-land.

Bempton Cliffs

A family favourite, and easily the best place in England to see, hear and smell seabirds! More than 200,000 birds (from April to August) make the cliffs seem alive - with adults bringing food to their nests, or young chicks making their first faltering flights.

Berney Marshes and Breydon Water

Experience the spectacle of the tens of thousands of wintering ducks, geese and swans that visit the estuary and surrounding grazing marshes. In spring, the marshes are filled with the atmospheric calls of lapwings and redshanks, all breeding on one of the UK's largest expanses of wet grassland.

Blacktoft Sands

Come to Blacktoft Sands throughout the year and see how many of our 270 species of birds you can see! The tidal reedbed is the largest in England and is important for its breeding bearded tits, bitterns and marsh harriers.

Blean Woods

This is a wonderful place for quiet walks in beautiful ancient woodland. There are five trails of up to eight miles long that meander through the woods. In summer, look out for damselflies, dragonflies and butterflies, including the rare heath fritillary butterfly. As dusk falls, you may see nightjars gliding on silent wings, and hear their churring call.

Boyton and Hollesley Marshes

Situated between the Butley river and Ore estuary, Boyton Marshes attracts breeding wading birds in spring and ducks, geese and swans in winter. It's also great for watching owls, butterflies and dragonflies.

Campfield Marsh

The reserve is made up of a mosaic of saltmarsh, peatbogs, farmland and wet grassland providing homes for a great variety of native wildlife. Trails lead to a wheelchair accessible hide looking out over the main wet grassland area where lapwings, redshanks and snipe breed in the summer and thousands of swans, ducks and geese spend the winter.

Carngafallt

Carngafallt is a wonderful place to see birds or simply enjoy the view. The moorland landscape looks especially colourful in late summer, while spring is the perfect time to come and see migrant birds like redstarts, whinchats and tree pipits.

Coll

Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Coombes Valley

This is a delightful oak woodland to walk through - especially in spring and early summer when lots of migrating birds come to breed at the reserve. Birds you may see on the steep valley sides include flycatchers, redstarts and wood warblers. There are a wide variety of butterflies to spot too.

Corrimony

Watch the black grouse springtime courtship displays, see the crested tits and look out for the Scottish crossbill, the only UK bird that's found in no other country. Set in stunning moorland and Caledonian forest, this beautiful reserve is a treasure trove for anyone who loves birds.

Dungeness

If you haven't been to Dungeness, nothing can quite prepare you for this landscape - mile after mile of shingle, wild and weird! Dungeness's position, jutting into the English Channel, makes it ideally placed to watch for migrant birds arriving or departing.

Fairburn Ings

With pond dipping, regular fun events and walks to help you get away from it all, RSPB Fairburn Ings is the ideal place for adults and children to find out more about wildlife.

Fowlmere

Fowlmere's reedbeds and pools are fed by natural chalk springs, and a chalk stream runs through the reserve. Special birds include kingfishers, water rails, and nine species of warblers, including sedge warblers, reed warblers and grasshopper warblers.

Freiston Shore

At Freiston Shore you can get excellent views of waterbirds on the salt water lagoon, especially at high tide when wading birds roost, sometimes in their thousands.

Garston Wood

This ancient wood is at its best when its breathtaking carpets of bluebells, wood anemones and primroses are in bloom (mid-April to the end of May). Look for signs of badgers and fallow deer. There are common woodland birds in spring and turtle doves in spring and summer.

Ham Wall

Here you can enjoy a newly created wetland, which provides a safe home for many rare species including water voles and otters. In spring the reedbeds are alive with birdsong and in autumn you can see kingfishers flashing up and down the ditches. Bitterns are seen regularly all year round.

Havergate Island

This small island in the River Ore is famous for its breeding avocets and terns, which can be seen throughout the spring and summer. Access is by boat only and the trip to the island helps you really feel you're getting away from it all.

Insh Marshes

Insh Marshes National Nature Reserve is one of the most important wetlands in Europe. Enjoy a springtime stroll and look out for nesting lapwings, redshanks and curlews, or visit in the wintertime when the marsh floods.

Lake Vyrnwy

Our visitors' centre and well-stocked shop are the ideal places to start your visit. Join a trail through the woodland and birds are soon all around you.

Lakenheath Fen

At Lakenheath Fen, the RSPB has converted an area of arable farmland into a large wetland. There is a new visitor centre where you can find out more about the reserve, its wildlife and history. An events programme is run throughout the year, and family explorer backpacks and trail guides are available.

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Loch na Muilne

Loch na Muilne is a fantastic place to see a variety of breeding birds. During spring and summer, its most special inhabitants are red-necked phalaropes - tiny wading birds which feed by swimming on the loch in search of insects. Unusually, the female is more colourful than the male and performs most of the courtship rituals.

Loch of Kinnordy

This shallow loch is situated in a natural basin surrounded by farmland and attracts all types of wildlife. One favourite summer visitor is the osprey, which you can see fishing around the loch, while in the winter whooper swans and geese fly in. And don't miss the hubbub of the colony of black-headed gulls.

Loch of Strathbeg

Britain's largest dune loch is a joy to visit any time of year. In winter, thousands of wild geese, swans and ducks fly in, including 20 per cent of the world's population of pink-footed geese - it's a sight you'll never forget.

Loch Ruthven

This beautiful, tranquil loch is fringed by sedges and birch woods. Visit us in early spring, when our must-see bird, the rare Slavonian grebe, looks its best in gorgeous red and golden plumage, the jewel of the Highland Lochs.

Lochwinnoch

As one of the few wetlands left in west Scotland, Lochwinnoch is an ideal day out for all the family. It's the perfect spot to watch whooper swans, wigeons and a wide variety of ducks during the winter months. In spring, you won't want to miss the elaborate displays of the great crested grebes.

Lower Lough Erne Islands

Lough Erne is one of the largest freshwater lakes in the UK. Take a leisurely stroll around the forest trails and look across to some of the 40 islands that make up most of the reserve, two of which you can visit by boat.

Marazion Marsh

This reserve overlooks the beautiful St Michael's Mount and boasts Cornwall's largest reedbed. More than 250 bird, 500 plant, 500 insect and 18 mammal species have been recorded here and bitterns are now regular winter visitors (although patience is required to see them).

Mill Dam, Shapinsay

This is an ideal place for birds throughout the year. In summer, you'll see large numbers of breeding wildfowl, including pintails, redshanks and wigeons, while in the winter migrating whooper swans and other birds visit.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

Dearne Valley - Old Moor

Situated right at the heart of the Dearne Valley, Old Moor is a wonderful place to come and watch wildlife. The skies, fields and open water are teeming with birds throughout the year.

Ouse Washes

In the heart of The Fens, the Ouse Washes forms the largest area of washland (grazing pasture that floods in the winter) in the UK. The reserve attracts thousands of ducks and swans in winter, and in spring, hundreds of snipe, lapwings and redshanks breed.

Pilsey Island

This small reserve comprises a wide range of coastal habitats; intertidal sandflats and mudflats, fore dunes and yellow dunes, bare and vegetated shingle and saltmarsh. As well as large numbers of roosting birds, an impressive variety of unusual plants, spiders and insects exist on the reserve, thriving in the undisturbed habitats. There is no access to the reserve itself, but it can easily be viewed from surrounding rights of way.

Radipole Lake

A nature reserve in central Weymouth sounds unlikely, but once you are on the footpath amongst the reeds and lagoons you could be far away in the countryside.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Rockland Marshes

This small reserve provides views over Rockland Broad, the River Yare, reedbeds and open grazing marshes, via a wheelchair-friendly path. A hide overlooks the Broad, where in spring and summer, kingfishers and great crested grebes can be seen. Along the path, wetland warblers can be seen and barn owls often hunt.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

Stour Estuary

Enjoy trails up to five miles long as you stroll through a wood and watch wading birds, ducks and geese on the estuary. In spring, nightingales and other birds fill the woods with song. The spring flowers are also particularly beautiful.

Strumpshaw Fen

Walk round the reedbeds, woodlands and orchid-rich meadows and you could chance upon marsh harriers, bitterns and kingfishers. Come in spring and summer when the meadows bloom with flowers, and see an array of dragonflies and butterflies, including the spectacular swallowtail.

Surlingham Church Marsh

This small reserve provides a delightful circular walk around reedbeds, fens and pools. In spring and summer, marsh harriers, kingfishers, water rails, and reed and sedge warblers can be seen. Wetland wild flowers provide a riot of colour.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

Tudeley Woods

Get away from it all with a walk in the woods and through the newly restored heathland. In some areas there are grand old trees; in others the trees have been coppiced to open up the woodland floor and allow the woodland flowers and butterflies to flourish.

West Sedgemoor

West Sedgemoor is part of England's largest remaining wet meadow system. Set among the Somerset Levels and Moors, it has the largest lowland population of breeding wading birds such as lapwings, snipe, curlew and redshanks in southern England.

Ynys-hir

Ynys-hir mixes Welsh oak woodland with wet grassland and saltmarshes. Feast your eyes from any of our seven hides - look out for birds of prey. Then round off your visit with a snack at the visitors' centre.

Dingle Marshes

Dingle Marshes is a superb mixture of coastal and freshwater habitats bordered by forest and heathland.

Winterbourne Downs

At Winterbourne Downs we're re-creating species-rich chalk grassland. The reserve will form an important link between the extensive grasslands of Salisbury Plain and Porton Down. Wander through the grassland in summer and you will be delighted with the myriad of flowers and the gentle buzz of insects.

Geltsdale

Set in the beautiful North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), home to black grouse, birds of prey and breeding waders and ideal for walking. There are four waymarked trails leading from the car park at Howgill.

Nene Washes

The Nene Washes is one of the finest areas of floodplain meadows in the UK with large numbers of breeding wading birds, including snipe and black-tailed godwits.

Adur Estuary

The small reserve is composed of saltmarsh and mudflats that afford a good feeding and roosting site for waders and wildfowl. The reserve has no facilities as such, but it can be readily viewed from the surrounding footpaths and rewarding views can be had from Coronation Green, which is situated near the town centre of Shoreham-by-Sea.

Langstone Harbour

Langstone Harbour is a muddy estuary that attracts large numbers of birds all year round. Terns, gulls and wading birds descend to breed on the islands in spring and summer, while thousands of waders and brent geese migrate from the Arctic to feed and roost in safety here.

Dee Estuary - Burton Mere Wetlands

Inner Marsh Farm is a wonderful place to enjoy nature. In the mid '80s, we bought farmland here and turned it into a thriving wetland filled with glorious wildlife.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Church Wood

This is a beautiful place for a quiet woodland walk. You can take a stroll along dappled paths through beech, ash and oak trees. In springtime you can enjoy a carpet of sweet scented bluebells and there is also a flourishing wild flower meadow.

Cwm Clydach

Enjoy a stroll through a peaceful woodland setting on a lovely summer day. You might see pied flycatchers, redstarts and buzzards, as well as dippers along the reaches of the Lower Clydach river.

Fore Wood

This is a glorious and peaceful woodland, with fascinating 'ghylls' - steep-sided little ravines in the sandstone - where rare ferns grow. In spring the reserve is a mass of bluebells and wood anemones, with early purple orchids adding to the show.

Glenborrodale

Here on the shore of Loch Sunart, on the rugged Ardnamurchan peninsula, wood warblers nest in the spring, along with redstarts, spotted flycatchers and common woodland birds. You may well see an otter along the shore, and seals are common.

Otmoor

Otmoor is a magical nature reserve of wet meadows and reedbeds. It is a haven in winter for thousands of ducks, such as teals and wigeons, and in spring and summer for breeding wading birds, such as lapwings and redshanks.

Portmore Lough

Portmore Lough is a great day out at any time of year. In summer, the hay meadows attract a bewildering variety of insects, while in the winter greylag geese, whooper swans and thousands of ducks can be seen from the hide.

Brading Marshes

Brading Marshes is the RSPB's first reserve on the Isle of Wight. It covers most of the beautiful valley of the lower River Yar running from the village of Brading to the sea at Bembridge Harbour.

Cottascarth and Rendall Moss

If you'd like to visit a remote, tranquil wildlife haven, and enjoy the chance to see majestic raptors such as hen harriers and merlins, this is the place to come.

Brodgar

Could there be a more spellbinding and mystical setting? This reserve surrounds the monument of the ring of Brodgar. Visit during the summer and hear the unmistakable bubbling cries of the curlews and the drumming of the snipe. You should also be able to see lapwings, dunlins, redshanks and oystercatchers.

Mawddach Valley - Coed Garth Gell

Nestled in the spectacular Mawddach Valley, Coed Garth Gell is a woodland and heathland nature reserve. The visitor trails weave through beautiful oak woodland with a fast-flowing river in the valley bottom.

The Loons and Loch of Banks

The Loons and Loch of Banks are the largest remaining wetlands in Orkney, and the perfect places to see wetland wildlife at its best. Enjoy the tranquillity of pools surrounded by yellow flag iris, while the sounds of wading birds, ducks and geese fill the air.

Carsington Water

Owned and managed by Severn Trent Water, Carsington Water is a large reservoir. It boasts a range of wildlife habitats from ancient hedgerows, species-rich wildflower meadows and native woodlands, to pond and scrapes, reedbeds and carefully-managed islands.

Aghatirourke

Aghatirourke is part of the Cuilcagh Mountain World Geopark in County Fermanagh. It's an area of extensive upland blanket bog habitat bordered by limestone grassland to the north, and montane heath on the summit to the south.

Gwenffrwd-Dinas

Enjoy a walk through enchanting alder and oak woodland, past fast-flowing, spectacular rivers. This reserve is set in the heart of the beauty of mid Wales.

Lough Foyle

These remote mudflats and fields are the ideal place to see brent geese, whooper swans and wigeons in the early winter months. The best vantage points are on the minor roads off the A2 between Limavady and Londonderry.

Dove Stone

A landscape that will take your breath away. Towering hills, sheer rock faces, swathes of open moorland, a picturesque reservoir - that's Dove Stone, the northern gateway to the Peak District National Park.

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe.

Flatford Wildlife Garden

In a quiet corner of Suffolk, we have transformed an overgrown, forgotten garden into our first dedicated wildlife garden. Why not pay a visit and be inspired to garden for wildlife in your own garden!

Swell Wood

The ancient oaks of Swell Wood are part of a continuous strip of woodland extending some 10 miles along the ridge from Langport to the Blackdown Hills.

Tollie Red Kites

With stunning views across Easter Ross to Ben Wyvis, Tollie Red Kites provides close-up views of our most graceful bird of prey. A team of volunteers feed the birds every day and you can watch them feed from the comfort of a specially-converted farmstead building.

Pagham Harbour Local Nature Reserve

Pagham Harbour is a glorious and peaceful nature reserve, one of the few undeveloped stretches of the Sussex coast, and an internationally important wetland site for wildlife.

Eastern Moors

A landscape where there's lots to see and do, the Eastern Moors is almost entirely open access with a network of bridleways and footpaths and internationally-renowned climbing edges.