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You are browsing places tagged with the waders keyword.

Arne

This is an unusual and special landscape where you can enjoy a vast expanse of open heathland and old oak woodland. Arne is a fantastic place for family walks at any time of year and we have regular children's days that enable all the family to learn about the unique nature of the heaths.

Balranald

This beautiful Hebridean reserve has sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes. An information centre explains the importance of traditional crofting agriculture for corncrakes and other wildlife. Many wading and farmland birds nest on the flower-rich machair and croft-land.

Belfast Lough

This oasis of calm is just 10 minutes from the centre of Belfast. We manage the lagoon to create ideal conditions for wading birds and ducks in autumn and winter, and for breeding terns in summer.

Boyton and Hollesley Marshes

Situated between the Butley river and Ore estuary, Boyton Marshes attracts breeding wading birds in spring and ducks, geese and swans in winter. It's also great for watching owls, butterflies and dragonflies.

Buckenham Marshes

Buckenham Marshes is a traditionally managed grazing marsh with large numbers of breeding wading birds, and ducks and geese in winter. The reserve also often boasts the only regular winter flock of bean geese in England (November to February), together with white-fronted geese and up to 10,000 wigeons.

Campfield Marsh

The reserve is made up of a mosaic of saltmarsh, peatbogs, farmland and wet grassland providing homes for a great variety of native wildlife. Trails lead to a wheelchair accessible hide looking out over the main wet grassland area where lapwings, redshanks and snipe breed in the summer and thousands of swans, ducks and geese spend the winter.

Cliffe Pools

Cliffe Pools nature reserve offers a spectacular landscape of open water and big skies. The reserve is one of the most important places for wildlife in the UK with huge flocks of wetland birds. A number of nature trails cross the reserve, affording great views of the pools, wildlife and the River Thames which runs alongside.

Dungeness

If you haven't been to Dungeness, nothing can quite prepare you for this landscape - mile after mile of shingle, wild and weird! Dungeness's position, jutting into the English Channel, makes it ideally placed to watch for migrant birds arriving or departing.

Fetlar

The whole island of Fetlar is a haven for flora and fauna, and a great place to come exploring. Along the coast you might be lucky enough to see otters. The island is full of birds in summer, including red-throated divers, golden plovers, skuas and wild rock doves.

Freiston Shore

At Freiston Shore you can get excellent views of waterbirds on the salt water lagoon, especially at high tide when wading birds roost, sometimes in their thousands.

Hayle Estuary

In cold winters, as many as 18,000 birds have been seen here, because this most south westerly estuary in the UK never freezes. During spring and autumn, it is an ideal place to see migrant wading birds, gulls and terns.

Insh Marshes

Insh Marshes National Nature Reserve is one of the most important wetlands in Europe. Enjoy a springtime stroll and look out for nesting lapwings, redshanks and curlews, or visit in the wintertime when the marsh floods.

Ken-Dee Marshes

With stunning views across the River Dee and Loch Ken, this tranquil reserve plays host to many exciting winter visitors, including Greenland white-fronted and greylag geese. Spring is also an excellent time to visit.

Leighton Moss

Leighton Moss is the largest reedbed in north-west England, and home to some really special birds such as breeding bitterns, bearded tits and marsh harriers. You might see deer too, not to mention butterflies aplenty!

Loch Gruinart

There's always plenty to see at Loch Gruinart. In autumn, thousands of white-fronted and barnacle geese arrive from Greenland. When they leave in spring, wading birds take centre-stage, with the courtship displays of snipe, lapwings, redshanks and curlews. Watch it all take place from our viewing centre and hides, or on one of our trails.

Loch na Muilne

Loch na Muilne is a fantastic place to see a variety of breeding birds. During spring and summer, its most special inhabitants are red-necked phalaropes - tiny wading birds which feed by swimming on the loch in search of insects. Unusually, the female is more colourful than the male and performs most of the courtship rituals.

Lower Lough Erne Islands

Lough Erne is one of the largest freshwater lakes in the UK. Take a leisurely stroll around the forest trails and look across to some of the 40 islands that make up most of the reserve, two of which you can visit by boat.

Marshside

There's something for everyone all year round at this delightful coastal reserve. In the spring you can see brown hares boxing in the fields, while in the early summer you'll spot nesting birds like avocets and lapwings.

Minsmere

There's so much to see and hear at Minsmere: splendid woodland, wetland and coastal scenery, rare birds breeding and calling in on their migrations, shy wildlife like otters, the booming call of bitterns in spring, beautiful bugs and colourful wild flowers in summer.

North Warren

This delightful reserve contains grazing marshes, reedbeds, heathland and woodland. Thousands of ducks, swans and geese use the marshes in winter, while spring brings breeding bitterns, marsh harriers, woodlarks and nightingales.

Onziebust

Come during the spring and summer and you will see a wonderfully exuberant display of summer flowers and possibly the rare great yellow bumblebee.

Pilsey Island

This small reserve comprises a wide range of coastal habitats; intertidal sandflats and mudflats, fore dunes and yellow dunes, bare and vegetated shingle and saltmarsh. As well as large numbers of roosting birds, an impressive variety of unusual plants, spiders and insects exist on the reserve, thriving in the undisturbed habitats. There is no access to the reserve itself, but it can easily be viewed from surrounding rights of way.

Snettisham

This is the place to witness two of the UK's great wildlife spectacles: tens of thousands of wading birds wheeling over the mudflats, or packed onto roostbanks and islands in front of our hides at high tide, plus the dawn and dusk flights of skies full of pink-footed geese.

Stour Estuary

Enjoy trails up to five miles long as you stroll through a wood and watch wading birds, ducks and geese on the estuary. In spring, nightingales and other birds fill the woods with song. The spring flowers are also particularly beautiful.

Titchwell Marsh

This popular reserve on the north Norfolk coast has something for everyone. A walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach takes you past reedbeds and shallow lagoons, which are often full of birds. You can sit on benches or watch from spacious, wheelchair-accessible hides.

West Sedgemoor

West Sedgemoor is part of England's largest remaining wet meadow system. Set among the Somerset Levels and Moors, it has the largest lowland population of breeding wading birds such as lapwings, snipe, curlew and redshanks in southern England.

Newport Wetlands

This nature reserve offers a haven for wildlife on the edge of the city, but is a great place for people too with a new RSPB visitor centre, a café, shop and children's play area.

Dingle Marshes

Dingle Marshes is a superb mixture of coastal and freshwater habitats bordered by forest and heathland.

Isley Marsh

Isley Marsh is made up of saltmarsh and intertidal mudflats on the southern edge of the Taw Torridge estuary. It is an important haven in the busy estuary for undisturbed feeding and resting birds, especially the wintering flocks of ducks and waders.

Tetney Marshes

Tetney Marshes covers a vast area of coastal mudflats, salt marsh, dunes and saline lagoons on the north Lincolnshire coast. The reserve forms an important part of the Humber, which is one of the top five estuaries for birds in the UK, with at least 175,000 birds using the estuary during the winter months.

Vange Marsh

Vange Marsh is a mosaic of wetland habitats. Fresh and saltwater lagoons attract breeding avocets, common terns, little ringed plovers, lapwings and reed buntings. In winter, wigeons, teals and shovelers visit the site and bearded tits thrive in the reedbeds.

West Canvey Marsh

West Canvey Marsh is the largest single area of green space on Canvey Island. It's one of our South Essex Marshes nature reserves. This wetland includes nearly two miles (3 km) of new nature trails, three viewing points, a picnic area and children's adventure area.

Adur Estuary

The small reserve is composed of saltmarsh and mudflats that afford a good feeding and roosting site for waders and wildfowl. The reserve has no facilities as such, but it can be readily viewed from the surrounding footpaths and rewarding views can be had from Coronation Green, which is situated near the town centre of Shoreham-by-Sea.

Langstone Harbour

Langstone Harbour is a muddy estuary that attracts large numbers of birds all year round. Terns, gulls and wading birds descend to breed on the islands in spring and summer, while thousands of waders and brent geese migrate from the Arctic to feed and roost in safety here.

Nor Marsh and Motney Hill

Nor Marsh is a saltmarsh island in the Medway Estuary. To the east is Motney Hill, another area of mud and saltmarsh. In winter at both sites, large numbers of wildfowl can be seen. In spring and autumn, look out for black-tailed godwits.

Elmley Marshes

If you thought that there was no wilderness left in the south-east, come and have a look at Elmley Marshes! The two-mile drive across the vast wetlands, managed by the Elmley Conservation Trust, to get to the reserve car park is an exciting start to your visit.

Northward Hill

On a ridge overlooking the Thames Marshes, Northward Hill includes a lovely bluebell wood where nightingales sing in spring. Over 100 pairs of grey herons nest in the trees, with what is one of the UK's largest and most famous colonies of little egrets.

Old Hall Marshes

Our reserve here comprises extensive grazing marshes with brackish water fleets, reedbeds, saltmarsh and two offshore islands. In winter, thousands of wildfowl come here and summer sees breeding waders.

Loch of Spiggie

A visit to the Loch of Spiggie shows you just what a wonderful variety of birds and wildlife rely on Scottish lochs for their survival. If you visit in summer, you'll see Arctic terns and great skuas bathing in the water.

Dee Estuary - Burton Mere Wetlands

Inner Marsh Farm is a wonderful place to enjoy nature. In the mid '80s, we bought farmland here and turned it into a thriving wetland filled with glorious wildlife.

Middleton Lakes

Nestled in the beautiful Tame valley, just south of Tamworth on the Staffordshire/Warwickshire border, Middleton Lakes is our latest nature reserve to open to the public.

Ouse Fen

In the Cambridgeshire Fens we're working with Hanson on an ambitious scheme. We're transforming a working sand and gravel quarry into a vast nature reserve with open water, grassland and, when complete, the biggest reedbed in the UK.

Fen Drayton Lakes

This complex of lakes and traditional riverside meadows next to the River Great Ouse used to be gravel workings. It is a fantastic place to explore and watch birds with huge numbers of ducks, swans and geese on the lakes in winter. In summer, terns, hobbies and a variety of dragonflies are regularly seen. Otters also live here, but are rarely seen.

Culbin Sands

Truly get away from it all at this remote and unspoilt reserve. Come during the winter and you'll see sea ducks feeding offshore, while from late summer to late spring, large numbers of bar-tailed godwits, oystercatchers and knots flock at high tide.

Frampton Marsh

A major new extension to this coastal wetland reserve includes a reedbed, large freshwater scrapes and wet grassland. These habitats have all been created to bring the wildlife of the Wash closer to you.

Udale Bay

From late summer to April you can see thousands of wildfowl and wading birds here. Come an hour or two either side of high tide to be rewarded with spectacular views of flocks of flying birds.

Otmoor

Otmoor is a magical nature reserve of wet meadows and reedbeds. It is a haven in winter for thousands of ducks, such as teals and wigeons, and in spring and summer for breeding wading birds, such as lapwings and redshanks.

Portmore Lough

Portmore Lough is a great day out at any time of year. In summer, the hay meadows attract a bewildering variety of insects, while in the winter greylag geese, whooper swans and thousands of ducks can be seen from the hide.

Dee Estuary - Point of Ayr

Come during the winter months and you'll be able to see thousands of birds feeding. High tide is the best time to visit, when the rising waters force the birds onto the saltmarshes, so you get even closer views.

Brading Marshes

Brading Marshes is the RSPB's first reserve on the Isle of Wight. It covers most of the beautiful valley of the lower River Yar running from the village of Brading to the sea at Bembridge Harbour.

Birsay Moors

If you enjoy the solemn grandeur of moorland landscape, the Orkney moors can be a wonderful place to visit, full of wild and windswept beauty. Come during the summer to see hen harriers, short-eared owls and elegant Arctic skuas nesting.

Cottascarth and Rendall Moss

If you'd like to visit a remote, tranquil wildlife haven, and enjoy the chance to see majestic raptors such as hen harriers and merlins, this is the place to come.

Brodgar

Could there be a more spellbinding and mystical setting? This reserve surrounds the monument of the ring of Brodgar. Visit during the summer and hear the unmistakable bubbling cries of the curlews and the drumming of the snipe. You should also be able to see lapwings, dunlins, redshanks and oystercatchers.

Dearne Valley - Bolton Ings

This new reserve gives you a chance to get up close to a reedbed and its fascinating inhabitants. Bitterns come to spend winter camouflaged amongst the reeds and we hope they'll stay to breed soon. It's easy to access from the Dearne Way footpath and Trans Pennine Trail.

Broubster Leans

Lying seven miles south-west of Thurso, Broubster Leans is a diverse mosaic of wet grassland, pools, channels and rush pasture, nestled in farmland, making it an ideal place for wildlife.

Morecambe Bay - Hest Bank

The sandflats and saltmarshes of Morecambe Bay are vital feeding grounds for a quarter of a million wading birds, ducks and geese. It's the second most important estuary in the UK and is protected by European and UK law. You can get great views of the spectacular flocks of birds.

Meikle Loch

This reserve is important for its wintering wildfowl, particularly the large roost of pink-footed geese that occurs in the winter months. A variety of passage waders and wildfowl also use the site and ospreys and marsh harriers may be seen in the summer.

Hesketh Out Marsh

This new saltmarsh reserve is a great place to admire the gathered pink-footed geese, wigeons, teals and other wildfowl in winter, along with big flocks of golden plovers, lapwings and black-tailed godwits. In spring the marshes are alive with the sight and sound of displaying waders, including avocets and lapwings. But as recently as 2006, the land was used for growing crops.

Marwick Head

This remote headland has spectacular displays of wild flowers, including sea campion, thrift and spring squill. In spring and summer, thousands of seabirds nest on the cliffs. In August, look out for great yellow bumblebees.

The Loons and Loch of Banks

The Loons and Loch of Banks are the largest remaining wetlands in Orkney, and the perfect places to see wetland wildlife at its best. Enjoy the tranquillity of pools surrounded by yellow flag iris, while the sounds of wading birds, ducks and geese fill the air.

South Essex Marshes

The Visitor Centre and Discovery Zone are located within Basildon District Council's Wat Tyler Country Park and are the gateway to our South Essex Marshes reserves.

Ribble Discovery Centre

Come to our visitor centre on the edge of Fairhaven Lake. It's the gateway to the north side of the Ribble Estuary - the most important single river estuary in the UK - which attracts over 270,000 birds each year.

Darts Farm

On the outskirts of Exeter, Darts Farm is home to a large variety of birds, insects and other wildlife. Our shop here is part of a large shopping complex in beautiful farmland, with ponds and wetland areas.

Beckingham Marshes

Beckingham Marshes is a major habitat creation project on the River Trent floodplain, where we've created a wet grassland habitat.

Langford Lowfields

We're working in partnership with Tarmac to restore a sand and gravel quarry on the River Trent into the biggest reedbed in the East Midlands. At present there is a public footpath that follows the entire perimeter of the site, giving great views of the changing landscape.

Nigg Bay

Nigg Bay is an extensive area of mudflat, saltmarsh and wet grassland on the Cromarty Firth. Visit any time between October and March and you're sure to see countless wading birds, such as bar-tailed godwits and knots.

Snape

Snape is an exciting new reserve where we're recreating important wetland and heathland areas.

Lough Foyle

These remote mudflats and fields are the ideal place to see brent geese, whooper swans and wigeons in the early winter months. The best vantage points are on the minor roads off the A2 between Limavady and Londonderry.

Bowling Green Marsh

Bowling Green Marsh is on the east bank of the Exe Estuary, within easy walking distance of both Topsham High Street and our shop at Darts Farm. It overlooks the Clyst and allows over-wintering birds a choice of safe roosting sites as the rising tide pushes them off the mudflats.

Matford Marsh

Matford Marshes is a small, relatively new site halfway between Exeter and Exminster - just 3 miles from the city centre. It's one of our Exe Estuary reserves.

Exminster and Powderham Marshes

Just five miles from Exeter city centre, Exminster and Powderham Marshes are great places to see birds all year-round. You can enjoy lovely walks here in this fascinating landscape.

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe.

Crook of Baldoon

The view that opens up in front of you is breathtaking. Cairnsmore of Fleet and the Galloway Hills act as a backdrop to wild saltmarsh and mudflats which positively ooze with birdlife. Watch thousands of wading birds wheel in the sky in a mesmerising display.

Pagham Harbour Local Nature Reserve

Pagham Harbour is a glorious and peaceful nature reserve, one of the few undeveloped stretches of the Sussex coast, and an internationally important wetland site for wildlife.