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You are browsing places tagged with the whales and dolphins keyword.

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Stroll down a shell-white beach, marvel at the summer colour as the flowers bloom along the sand dunes, and keep your eyes peeled for the most elusive of birds. You'll probably hear the corncrake's distinctive rasping call between May and July - but will you see one?

Fowlsheugh

If you're new to birdwatching, what better way to see the beauty of birds close up than by visiting a seabird cliff colony? The spectacular cliffs at Fowlsheugh are packed with 130,000 breeding seabirds in the spring and summer, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

Mull of Galloway

Everywhere you turn there's a stunning view. To the west is the Solway Firth and Irish Sea, with the Isle of Man in the distance, while all around you is the frenzied activity of a large cliff colony of sea birds, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

Noup Cliffs

Reaching over 76 metres above the sea, these dramatic cliffs house Orkney's largest seabird colony. Once seen, it's never forgotten! Walk along the cliff path in the summer and you'll see an array of wildflowers, while below you on the cliffs, guillemots, kittiwakes and razorbills will be nesting.

Ramsey Island

This dramatic offshore island has cliffs up to 120 m high, the perfect place for breeding seabirds in spring and early summer. Walk along the coastal heathland and enjoy the spectacular views.

Sumburgh Head

Visit these cliffs during the summer and you'll be privileged to witness the amazing spectacle of thousands of breeding seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, shags and fulmars. Sumburgh Head is a great place to watch for whales and dolphins, particularly minke whales and orcas.

The Oa

Rugged coastline and open moorland. The diversity of landscapes make this reserve a pleasure to visit. If you're new to birdwatching, why not come on one of our guided walks - you might see a rare chough or perhaps a golden eagle.

Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland's only mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills, along with several other species, including puffins. You may even be lucky enough to see porpoises, minke whales or dolphins offshore. Please take care on the cliffs.

Hoy

This mixture of moorland and cliff tops may be exposed to the elements, so you really do need to wrap up warm, but a visit is very rewarding. You'll see the famous Old Man of Hoy rock stack that has inspired generations of climbers, not to mention the nesting seabirds that have been known to dive-bomb them too!