RSPB
Skip navigation
Print page

Reserves by keyword

You are browsing places tagged with the wind keyword.

Dungeness

If you haven't been to Dungeness, nothing can quite prepare you for this landscape - mile after mile of shingle, wild and weird! Dungeness's position, jutting into the English Channel, makes it ideally placed to watch for migrant birds arriving or departing.

Fowlsheugh

If you're new to birdwatching, what better way to see the beauty of birds close up than by visiting a seabird cliff colony? The spectacular cliffs at Fowlsheugh are packed with 130,000 breeding seabirds in the spring and summer, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

Loch na Muilne

Loch na Muilne is a fantastic place to see a variety of breeding birds. During spring and summer, its most special inhabitants are red-necked phalaropes - tiny wading birds which feed by swimming on the loch in search of insects. Unusually, the female is more colourful than the male and performs most of the courtship rituals.

Marshside

There's something for everyone all year round at this delightful coastal reserve. In the spring you can see brown hares boxing in the fields, while in the early summer you'll spot nesting birds like avocets and lapwings.

Mersehead

Discover the breathtaking scenery and wildlife that's typical of this region. Stroll along the nature trails and use the viewing hides to explore at your own pace.

Mull of Galloway

Everywhere you turn there's a stunning view. To the west is the Solway Firth and Irish Sea, with the Isle of Man in the distance, while all around you is the frenzied activity of a large cliff colony of sea birds, including guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes.

North Hill

Situated on the island of Papa Westray, North Hill may seem remote but it's a very exciting place to come and visit. The reserve is home to an extremely rare plant, the Scottish primrose, while stunning low level cliffs play host to nationally important numbers of breeding Arctic terns and skuas.

Stour Estuary

Enjoy trails up to five miles long as you stroll through a wood and watch wading birds, ducks and geese on the estuary. In spring, nightingales and other birds fill the woods with song. The spring flowers are also particularly beautiful.

Sumburgh Head

Visit these cliffs during the summer and you'll be privileged to witness the amazing spectacle of thousands of breeding seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, shags and fulmars. Sumburgh Head is a great place to watch for whales and dolphins, particularly minke whales and orcas.

Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland's only mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills, along with several other species, including puffins. You may even be lucky enough to see porpoises, minke whales or dolphins offshore. Please take care on the cliffs.

Elmley Marshes

If you thought that there was no wilderness left in the south-east, come and have a look at Elmley Marshes! The two-mile drive across the vast wetlands, managed by the Elmley Conservation Trust, to get to the reserve car park is an exciting start to your visit.

Dee Estuary - Parkgate

Come to Parkgate to see ducks, geese, wading birds and birds of prey exploring the marsh. During low tides, birds stay far out on the estuary, so the best time to visit is during high tide. That's when you could get great, close-up views of birds of prey hunting, or wading birds, depending on the season.

Morecambe Bay - Hest Bank

The sandflats and saltmarshes of Morecambe Bay are vital feeding grounds for a quarter of a million wading birds, ducks and geese. It's the second most important estuary in the UK and is protected by European and UK law. You can get great views of the spectacular flocks of birds.

Marwick Head

This remote headland has spectacular displays of wild flowers, including sea campion, thrift and spring squill. In spring and summer, thousands of seabirds nest on the cliffs. In August, look out for great yellow bumblebees.

Dearne Valley - Wombwell Ings

Lapwings, redshanks and snipe come to breed at this wet grassland haven. You might also see waders dropping in on their migration or ducks and geese on the open water.