RSPB
Skip navigation
Print page

How the second-hand binocular scheme works

Bird guide training at the Rwenzori National Mountains Park in Uganda

Bird guide training at the Rwenzori National Mountains Park in Uganda

Image: Esther Bertram

Since it began in 1985, the RSPB's second-hand binocular scheme has provided more than 12,000 pieces of optical equipment to conservation and education projects in more than 90 countries.

From Vietnam to Greece, India to Ecuador, binoculars and telescopes have found their way to projects in some of the world’s most remote communities, often delivered by RSPB staff and supporters. 

We have been able to provide equipment for a range of initiatives across the world that have helped educate people and protect many different species. 

'Without it, the projects would have been much more difficult to run'

Without it, the projects would have been much more difficult to run, as many of the organisations could not have afforded to buy binoculars and telescopes.

As they upgrade their equipment, lots of people put their old binoculars and telescopes in the back of cupboards and forget about them. This is a really good way of putting them to a good use.

The initiative has helped a range of projects, including equipping Angola’s first-ever bird hide, the chance for Tanzanian school children to see close-up views of wildlife at a national park and for park rangers on a Brazilian rainforest reserve to protect wildlife from illegal hunters.

For more information, call 01767 693690. E-mail: binoenquiries@rspb.org.uk