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Months

January

Gardens can prove a real life-saver for birds at this time of year, especially when it is frosty or snowy. Birds become bolder, venturing into gardens in search of scattered scraps and well-stocked feeders and bird tables. More...

January

February

If you regularly go out into the garden at daybreak, you will notice the birdsong increasing as the days get longer. Male birds are starting to mark out their territories ready for mating and the nesting season. Natural food supplies may be in short supply, especially when deep frosts persist. More...

February

March

Wildlife begins to stir in the south and west of the country, while the north may still be firmly in the grip of winter. As nest building begins robins, sparrows, blackbirds and other garden birds fly back and forth with twigs and other plant debris. More...

March

April

The nesting season is now well under way, and adult birds are getting more daring in their quest for insects, grubs and berries to feed their fledglings. More...

April

May

The white blossom of hawthorn hedges and the arrival of swallows, swifts and martins mean spring is here. As supplies of nuts and berries dwindle, visiting and resident birds alike need good weather to generate fresh food in the form of insects and other small animals. More...

May

June

As midsummer approaches, now's the time to sit out and enjoy the garden. You'll see adult birds gathering food for fledglings right into the evening. More...

June

July

This is the time of year to enjoy the colours and scents of your garden. At dusk you may notice moths visiting honeysuckle and other scented flowers. More...

July

August

The sight of swallows lined up on telephone wires marks the turn of the year and signals the approach of autumn. By mid-August swifts have already left for Africa, although swallows and house martins linger a little bit longer, gathering in flocks before embarking on their long migration. More...

August

September

This is the month when summer suddenly seems to give way to autumn. Colours in the garden become more muted as seeds and fruit ripen, and leaves take on the first hints of red and brown. More...

September

October

A bird-friendly garden should be full of seeds, nuts and berries at this time of year. You might spot a jay scouting around for somewhere to bury fallen acorns and hazelnuts. If you let seedheads form on flowers and weeds such as teasels and thistles you'll attract finches, perhaps even brightly coloured goldfinches. More...

October

November

The gentle sunlight of autumn can often produce soft, golden colours as the foliage on shrubs and trees such as acers, cotoneasters, berberis and witchhazels turns from green through to orange and red. More...

November

December

The bare branches of winter make it easier to see the birds active in your garden. You might spot a blackcap hopping among shrubs looking for berries. They are traditionally summer visitors, but are now over-wintering as well. More...

December