September, 2013

Rainham Marshes

Rainham Marshes
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Rainham Marshes

  • Today's highlights: 29 September 2013

    It's been quite a nice day at Rainham today.

    We've had lovely views of a house martin passing food onto its young on the wing, marsh harrier, pintail, spotted flycatcher, spotted redshank, garganey, snipe, black tailed godwit, avocet, wheatear, dunlin and more!

    We've also seen the following flying over: redwing, tree pipit, yellow wagtail, ringed plover, and golden plover...

      House martin by Nick Upton (rspb-images.com)

  • 'Oi! Conehead!'

    This could be taken as a mildly offensive comment thrown a someone with a curiously pointed coiffure or more likely if you are out on the marsh an exclamation at the joy of discovering one of the two species of Conehead Crickets that we have here!

    There are Short-winged and Long-winged varieties and the latter used to be quite rare but is now probably as common at Rainham as the former.

    Phil Collins took this great shot the other day of this male Long-winged.... perhaps they should have been called Long-feelered instead?

    Dark Bush Crickets are also still very noisy and Phil also got a good shot of one of those too!

    29-9-13

  • Oh no... where did I put it?

    Our one eyed kestrel was spotted doing the "I'm sure it was here a minute ago" dance by Richard Duhrsen! What a brilliant video! A couple of people hvae told me that they can't see this video - if you can't see it click here)

    (Try upping the quality to 720 HD via the little cog in the bottom right hand corner for a better shot!)

    The kestrel has been spotted quite regularly - it seems to have a bit of a dodge left eye.
        These fab pictures are by Bill Crook - you can see where the bird is closing one eye.

    Poor thing... althoug it's not stopping it from catching marsh frogs!
      Picture by Brenda Clayton