Beached Bird Surveyor, Eastern England

Posted:
Wednesday 15 August 2018
Vacancy type:
Practical conservation, Volunteering at home, Surveying wildlife
Location:
Various locations

What we're looking for

The beached bird survey is a yearly event that allows us to gain an idea of trends in bird populations. Systematic surveys of beached bird corpses have documented the effect of oil pollution around the North Sea coast for decades. They have delivered useful information on the state, causes and extent of marine pollution and contributed to a number of measures to reduce oil pollution in the marine environment We need volunteers such as yourself to be able to cover as much coastline as possible in a co-ordinated count of birds washed ashore and the proportion oiled. We ask that you select a length of coastline from those in our database and survey it over one weekend in February.

The skills you need

Potential surveyors need to have basic seabird identification skills, and be fit enough to traverse a section of coastline and survey any dead birds that are found.

Your time

Minimum:
1 day per year
Duration:
Ongoing
Period:
One weekend in February

What's in it for you?

This is an excellent opportunity to help to contribute to overall records of bird populations, and assist the RSPB in tracking mortality rates in seabirds. It will also assist the RSPB in tracking oil pollution at sea, and is an opportunity to get to know your local coastline better. You may also see some interesting and rare seabirds whilst out on your surveys, as an added bonus. The RSPB is an active and exciting conservation charity, the largest in Europe!

How to apply

Contact

Ali Bennett, Eastern England Regional Office
Tel: 01603 660066
Email: Alison.Bennett@rspb.org.uk

Notes

Expenses will be re-imbursed where necessary. The RSPB works for a healthy environment rich in birds and wildlife. It relies on the support and generosity of volunteers to make a difference. The RSPB is the UK Partner of the global federation of conservation organisations, BirdLife International

Reference number 627