Humber estuary. Saltmarsh at Pyewipe, Grimsby.

The Humber Estuary

We are working to ensure that future development on the Humber complies with international law and does not result in a net loss to the environment.

About this site

The Humber Estuary is a vast place. It starts at Trent Falls, where the Trent and the Ouse meet, widening towards the North Sea finally meeting open water past the crooked finger of Spurn Point. 

The character of the estuary changes from the reed-fringed inner estuary with bitterns and marsh harriers to the wide expansive mudflats, saltmarshes and sand dunes as the Humber blends into the coast of the North Sea. In winter, the estuary throngs with wildfowl and wading birds in such numbers it is considered a site of international conservation importance. 

In common with so many of our big estuaries, the natural world of the Humber sits cheek by jowl with industry. 

The central Humber south bank is an area of particularly intense economic activity and progressive development. 

We are working to ensure future development on the Humber complies with international law and does not result in a net loss to the environment. Industry and the natural world can exist side-by-side so long as developers and decision makers take the necessary steps to protect the Humber's precious habitats and environments. 

Another issue which threatens the precious natural environment of the Humber is coastal squeeze. Over the next century, a combination of rising sea levels and improved flood defences on the Humber Estuary will result in the loss of its wildlife-rich intertidal habitats. We are working with the Environment Agency to help them fulfil their legal obligation to replace these areas by creating new habitat.

Marsh harrier, female in flight, Strumpshaw Fen, Norfolk

Map

Cases in this site

David Douglas (Conservation Scientist) heads up a team looking into the effects of a wind farm on Golden plover Pluvialis apricaria, Sutherland, Scotland

Able Logistics Park

Campaigning to protect wildlife as part of the Able UK, South Humber Gateway development.

Industry Transport
 Humber estuary. Saltmarsh at Pyewipe, Grimsby.

Able Marine Energy Park

Campaigning to ensure that the Able UK Marine Energy Park is wildlife friendly and not detrimental to nature.

Energy Industry
Lapwing Vanellus vanellus, standing in shallow water, Geltsdale RSPB reserve, Cumbria

Donna Nook Managed Realignment

East Lindsey Council have refused the Environment Agency permission to create new intertidal habitat at Donna Nook.

Plans