Spotted flycatcher Muscicapa striata, adult on lookout perch near nest, Bedfordshire

Birds without Borders

  • 1970s Since the 70s some migrant levels have fallen alarmingly
  • 40 years Falling numbers have been tracked for nearly half a century
  • 95% The staggering level of some population declines
Our target £2000000
£ 400000
Help us reach it
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Save our migrants

Many of our migrant birds are in trouble. Breeding populations of long-distance, trans-Saharan migrant birds have declined sharply since the 1970s. 

Some species have declined in the UK by a staggering 95 per cent over the last 40 years. We need to find out the reasons for these declines and work with partners to help save them.

'Our' summer visitors are, on average, here for just four months of the year. If we only focused our conservation efforts for migratory birds in that space of time, we would be missing the bigger picture.

These birds recognise no borders. Our 'Birds Without Borders' programme will raise awareness of the need for BirdLife International partners to work together, to integrate conservation for long-distance migrants by developing initiatives that will protect, conserve, improve, restore and create habitats across the range of migratory birds.

You can play a part in this story by donating whatever you can afford today to save these birds for future generations.

Willow warbler perched in a bare larch tree, Co. Durham

Birds without Borders

Naturalist and TV presenter Chris Packham investigates the extensive research and cutting edge science techniques being used in the UK and in Africa to help explain why our summer migrants are returning in fewer numbers each year.

Cuckoos, turtle doves, nightingales and many other summer migrants are among our favourite birds.  Naturalist and TV presenter Chris Packham investigates the extensive research and cutting edge science techniques being used in the UK and in Africa to help explain why our summer migrants are returning in fewer numbers each year.

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Screenshot of Birds without Borders video with Chris Packham

What we'll be doing

On the birds' breeding grounds in the UK, we're working to improve the breeding success of some of our most rapidly declining summer visitors.

On migration routes in Europe, we are working with our partners to help them achieve the same, and to ensure safe passage for birds on migration.

On the wintering grounds in Africa, where conservation must be integrated across an environment as important to the survival of people as it is to birds, we are working with BirdLife partners and other stakeholders to deliver sustainable conservation initiatives that provide benefits for both migrant birds and people.

We're working together

At its most fundamental, we need science to find practical solutions to the most pressing conservation problems and to keep us focused on the highest priorities. Our conservation work for migratory birds is underpinned by our scientific research.

By protecting migratory birds during their whole lifecycle in the UK, Europe and Africa - on their breeding grounds, during migration and on their wintering grounds - we can all help prevent the loss of our summer migrants.

Miel de Botton - "Birds Without Borders"

Listen to Miel de Botton sing her support for the campaign.

Listen to Miel de Botton sing her support for the campaign.

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Screenshot of Miel de Botton's video "Birds Without Borders"

Working in partnership

Why we need your help

£10

could help buy trees to restore lost habitat for migrants in Africa

£15

could go towards planting a hectare of seed-rich plants in the UK as food for turtle doves

£20

could go towards buying a geo-locator tag to track where the birds go