Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta, in bloom. Wood of Cree RSPB reserve, Dumfries & Galloway. Scotland.

Wildlife and the Economy

The environment and the economy are highly interconnected.

We know that conservation provides vast and varied life supporting and enhancing benefits to us all.

Transitioning to a Nature-Positive Economy

The Dasgupta Review on the Economics of Biodiversity, published on 2nd February, made recommendations about how we must transform our economic system if people, planet and nature are to continue to prosper.

As we begin to recover from COVID-19 and a turbulent political year, now is the time to work together and revive our world based on a new sustainable and resilient economic model.  Our response paper to the Review “Transitioning to a Nature-Positive Economy by 2030” with partners Vivid Economics,  Wildlife Country Link and Green Alliance identifies tangible actions that must now be implemented.  

Want to let us know your reactions or get involved in next steps to drive change? Please contact Jamie Audsley, Head of Future Nature jamie.audsley@rspb.org.uk

Transitioning to a Nature-Positive Economy by 2030

PDF, 3.3MB

Download report

The environment and the economy

We aim to demonstrate the fundamental importance of these links in campaigning for a broad and thorough approach to sustainable development.

Economic arguments can illustrate the benefits people gain from biodiversity, and ensure policy makers are as informed as possible about the wide-ranging payoffs of conserving our wildlife.

We use such arguments to guard against policies which provide economic incentives for people and businesses to damage the environment. We support policies which work towards environmental sustainability in terms of jobs and other economic opportunities.

Fairy Glen RSPB reserve. Foliage: young leaves back-lit, glow a vivid green. The Black Isle, Ross-shire, near Rosemarkie, Scotland

The economic case for nature

First year arable reversion Winterbourne Downs RSPB reserve (Manor Farm). Wiltshire

Fantastic places for wildlife can also be fantastic places for people. Economics is primarily concerned with human wellbeing and is therefore best placed to make arguments for the environment on this basis.