Who am I hearing?

The stars of our single don’t just sing – they trumpet, boom, drum and chur. But who does what?

Meet the stars

Find out more about the species featured in our 'Let Nature Sing' single.

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Let Nature Sing video

Who am I hearing?

  • 00.00 cuckoo
  • 00.04 nightingale - rich sounds
  • 00.10 wren (& 00.18) - the fast shrill sound
  • 00.14 blackbird & 00.22, 00.28 - the more mellow sound
  • 00.26 robin - the laid back squeaky sound
  • 00.20 & 00.25 great spotted woodpecker
  • 00.35 & 00.40, 00.44 crane - trumpeting
  • 00.38 curlew - bubbling
  • 00.45 lapwing - electric peewit
  • 00.48 swift - high scream
  • 00.54 bittern - boom
  • 01.09 snipe & 01.17 - amazing twang
  • 01.13 blackcap - melodic
  • 01.15 swallow - twittering, with strange buzz at end, & 01.18, 01.25
  • 01.23 great tit, & 01.30 "teacher teacher"
  • 01.33 sedge warbler - rhythmic notes
  • 01.35 grasshopper warbler - buzzing - has a fab way of singing, head up, throbbing with the effort
  • 01.38 skylark - musical (in background)
  • 01.45 song thrush - repeated notes, plus twiddle at 01.48 and 01.51, and repeated notes at 01.52 and 01.58
  • 01.54 nightingale - rich short verses and 02.02, 02.05, and then all musical verses to the end
  • 01.59 nightjar - churring, with wing clapping at 02.10
  • 02.03 tawny owl - hoot

Let Nature Sing

Let nature Sing, full-throated song

Over half of UK wildlife is in decline and time’s running out to protect what’s left. Don't let nature's music stop - join the Chorus Hub to get exclusive articles on Let Nature Sing and nature’s rock stars.