Dr Juliet Vickery

Head of International Research, Conservation Science

Background

I manage a team of scientists undertaking research in collaboration with partner organisations throughout the world. This research underpins conservation solutions for biological diversity at the species, site and habitat level.

Key personal interests are the causes of declines of and potential conservation action required for Afro-Palearctic migrant land birds, the problems relating to the impact of agriculture on biodiversity in temperate and tropical systems and the impact of invasive non-native species on the ecosystems of UK Overseas Territories.

Developing the scientific and technical capacity of partner organisations, particularly in Africa and South-East Asia, is a key part of our international work and is achieved mainly through embedding local staff in field teams, running training courses, supervision of PhD and Masters students and hosting internships.

External Activities

  • 2017 to present: Vice President of the British Ornithologists' Union
  • 2016 to present: Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge
  • 2014 to present: Member of the Expert Committee for the Darwin Initiative Grant
  • 2010 to present: Chair of the Public and Policy Committee, British Ecological Society

Partners and Collaboration

  • Dr Stuart Butchart, Birdlife International
  • Prof Bill Adams, University of Cambridge
  • Prof Will Cresswell, University of St Andrews
  • Prof Jenny Gill, University of East Anglia

Contact

Juliet Vickery

Dr Juliet Vickery

Head of International Research, Conservation Science

RSPB Centre of Conservation Science, David Attenborough Building, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, CB2 3QZ

juliet.vickery@rspb.org.uk

@juliet_vickery

Research Gate

Specialisms

Agriculture International species Tropical forests

Selected Publications

The decline of Afro-Palaearctic migrants and an assessment of potential causes

There is compelling evidence that Afro-Palaearctic (A-P) migrant bird populations have declined in Europe in recent decades, often to a greater degree than resident or short-distance migrants. There a...

Date
01 January 2014
RSPB Authors
Dr Juliet Vickery, Dr Steven Ewing, Prof Richard Gregory
Authors
Vickery, Juliet A. and colleagues
Published in
Ibis
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International Identifying problems International species

Identifying mismatches between habitat selection and habitat quality in a ground-nesting farmland bird

Human-induced habitat changes often generate novel or radically altered habitat characteristics, which can impair the ability of organisms to differentiate between suitable and unsuitable sites. This ...

Date
21 July 2011
RSPB Authors
Dr Guy Anderson, Dr Juliet Vickery
Authors
Gilroy, J.J., Anderson, G.Q.A., Vickery, J.A., Grice, P.V. & Sutherland, W.J.
Published in
Animal Conservation
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Yellow wagtail England Agriculture UK species

Eradication of invasive mammals on islands inhabited by humans and domestic animals

Non-native invasive mammal species have caused major ecological change on many islands. To conserve native species diversity, invasive mammals have been eradicated from several islands not inhabited...

Date
05 November 2011
RSPB Authors
Dr Steffen Oppel, Dr Juliet Vickery, Dr Mark Bolton
Authors
Oppel, S., Beaven, B.M., Bolton, M., Vickery, J. & Bodey, T.W.
Published in
Conservation Biology
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International International species

Global Coverage of Agricultural Sustainability Standards, and Their Role in Conserving Biodiversity

Worldwide, agriculture is a leading cause of habitat loss, soil erosion, pollution, water-stress, and greenhouse-gas emissions. Smallholder farmers struggle to make a living in markets distorted by subsidies and inequitable trading relations, and problems of child and slave labor persist.

Date
20 September 2016
RSPB Authors
Dr Fiona Sanderson, Dr Juliet Vickery
Authors
Andrew Balmford, Graeme M. Buchanan, Stuart H. M. Butchart, Heather Ducharme, Rhys E. Green, Jeffrey C. Milder, David H. L. Thomas, & Ben Phalan
Published in
Conservation Letters
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Agriculture

Farmland Biodiversity and the Footprint of Agriculture

Using farmland birds as a model system, we present a generic risk assessment framework that accurately predicts each species' current conservation status and population growth rate associated with past changes in agriculture. We demonstrate its value by assessing the potential impact on biodiversity of two controversial land uses, genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops and agri-environment schemes. 

Date
19 January 2007
RSPB Authors
Dr Juliet Vickery
Authors
S. J. Butler & Norris K.
Published in
Science 315 381-383
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Farmland Agriculture