Marine

The RSPB’s marine research programme uses both long-established methods and the latest cutting-edge technology to address a wide range of marine conservation issues.
Gannet Morus bassanus, immature birds in flight at Bass Rock

Overview

Working in partnership with leading seabird research institutes, we have instigated the largest programme of seabird tracking in Europe, which is revolutionising our understanding of seabird movements and distribution, and providing insights into the likely impacts of climate change. For species undergoing severe declines, we are carrying out detailed studies of the causes.

Further afield, we are working with our BirdLife partners and other key collaborators, tracking seabirds throughout the Atlantic Ocean and we are on the trail of species which may have been overlooked and are unknown to science in the South Atlantic. The results of all these projects are used by conservation agencies, planners and government to ensure adequate protection and a brighter future for the marine environment.

Who's involved

Coast on a stormy day

Dr Mark Bolton

Principal Conservation Scientist, Conservation Science

mark.bolton@rspb.org.uk
Coast on a stormy day

Dr Ellie Owen

Conservation Scientist, Conservation Science

ellie.owen@rspb.org.uk
Coast on a stormy day

Dr Steffen Oppel

Senior Conservation Scientist, Conservation Science

steffen.oppel@rspb.org.uk

Related publications

The justification, design and implementation of Ecological Risk Assessments of the effects of fishing on seabirds

Many marine species are threatened by high levels of incidental mortality in fisheries. This paper reviews the design of selected recent, detailed Ecological Risk Assessments (ERAs) of the effects of ...

Date
19 June 2012
Authors
Small, C., Waugh, S.M. & Phillips, R.A.
Published in
Marine Policy
View publication Details
International Marine

Space partitioning without territoriality in gannets

Colonial breeding is widespread among animals. Some, such as eusocial insects, may use agonistic behavior to partition available foraging habitat into mutually exclusive territories; others, such as ...

Date
05 July 2013
RSPB Authors
Dr Kendrew Colhoun, Dr Rowena Langston
Authors
Wakefield, E. D., Bodey, T.W., Bearhop, S., Blackburn, J., Colhoun, K., Davies, R., Dwyer, R.G., Green, J.A., Grémillet, D., Jackson, A.L., Jessopp, M.J., Kane, A., Langston, R.H.W., Lescroël, A., Murray, S., Le Nuz, M., Patrick, S.C., Péron, C., Soanes, L.M., Wanless, S. et al.
Published in
Science
View publication Details
UK Marine UK species

How many seabirds do we need to track to define home-range area?

In recent years, marine predator and seabird tracking studies have become ever more popular. However, they are often conducted without first considering how many individuals should be tracked and ...

Date
25 March 2013
RSPB Authors
Stephen Dodd
Authors
Soanes, L.M., Arnould, J.P.Y., Dodd, S.G., Sumner, M.D. & Green, J.A.
Published in
Journal of Applied Ecology
View publication Details
Wales Marine