New methods and technologies

Rapidly advancing new technology and technical methods are providing amazing new possibilities for conservation scientists to tackle priority research questions.
Tagging a bird

Overview

The range of animals which can be tracked using electronic tags is widening every year and the possible duration and accuracy of this tracking is increasing. Animal tracking can provide an increasing range of data: location, altitude, physiological condition, activity and imagery from current position.

Data on land use, habitat condition and even animal populations can be collected remotely, using techniques from satellite imagery, to unmanned aerial vehicles and static camera traps. Advances in analytical techniques and computer processing power are allowing the interrogation of increasingly large datasets, often on a global scale.

3D image of forest structure in Gola National Park, Sierra Leone, from airborne LiDAR.

To stay at the forefront of conservation technology, we have invested considerable in-house expertise in designing, manufacturing and deploying novel equipment and developing new analytical and methodological approaches. The application of technologies and techniques is now a key part of many of our research projects.

Who's involved

Coast on a stormy day

Nigel Butcher

Senior Technical Officer, Conservation Science

nigel.butcher@rspb.org.uk
Coast on a stormy day

Dr Graeme Buchanan

Principal Conservation Scientist, Conservation Science

graeme.buchanan@rspb.org.uk
Coast on a stormy day

Dr Steffen Oppel

Senior Conservation Scientist, Conservation Science

steffen.oppel@rspb.org.uk

Related publications

How many seabirds do we need to track to define home-range area?

In recent years, marine predator and seabird tracking studies have become ever more popular. However, they are often conducted without first considering how many individuals should be tracked and ...

Date
25 March 2013
RSPB Authors
Stephen Dodd
Authors
Soanes, L.M., Arnould, J.P.Y., Dodd, S.G., Sumner, M.D. & Green, J.A.
Published in
Journal of Applied Ecology
View publication Details
Wales Marine

Identifying optimal feeding habitat and proposed Marine Protected Areas (pMPAs) for the black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) suggests a need for complementary management approaches

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are an important conservation tool. For marine predators, recent research has focused on the use of Species Distribution Models (SDMs) to identify proposed sites. We used...

Date
06 June 2013
RSPB Authors
Dr Kendrew Colhoun
Authors
Chivers, L.S., Lundy, M.G., Colhoun, K., Newton, S.F., Houghton, J.D.R. & Reid, N.
Published in
Biological Conservation
View publication Details
UK Marine Protected areas UK species

Multicolony tracking reveals the winter distribution of a pelagic seabird on an ocean basin scale

An understanding of the non-breeding distribution and ecology of migratory species is necessary for successful conservation. Many seabirds spend the non-breeding season far from land, and information...

Date
26 November 2011
RSPB Authors
Dr Kendrew Colhoun
Authors
Frederiksen, M., Moe, B., Daunt, F., Phillips, R.A., Barrett, R.T., Bogdanova, M.I., Boulinier, T., Chardine, J.W., Chastel, O., Chivers, L.S., Christensen-Dalsgaard, S., Clement-Chastel, C., Colhoun, K., Freeman, R., Gaston, A.J., Gonzalez-Solis, J., Goutte, A., Gremillet, D., Guilford, T. & Jensen, G.H.
Published in
Diversity and Distributions
View publication Details
International UK Marine

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